Posts

caboto26 / Raimondo Guidacci

Architects: Raimondo Guidacci
Location: Turin, Italy
Collaborators: Roberto Spigarolo, Giancarlo Ambu
Area: 120.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Beppe Giardino

Project Managment: MAKEit snc di Spigarolo Roberto e Paolo
Contractors: Rheinzink, Pavesmac, Sikkens
Client: MAKEit snc di Spigarolo Roberto e Paolo…
Sigue leyendo

caboto26 / Raimondo Guidacci

Architects: Raimondo Guidacci
Location: Turin, Italy
Collaborators: Roberto Spigarolo, Giancarlo Ambu
Area: 120.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Beppe Giardino

Project Managment: MAKEit snc di Spigarolo Roberto e Paolo
Contractors: Rheinzink, Pavesmac, Sikkens
Client: MAKEit snc di Spigarolo Roberto e Paolo…
Sigue leyendo

3 Vaults / R3architetti

Architects: R3architetti
Location: Turin, Italy
Year: 2014
Photographs: Jacopo Gallitto

From the architect.… We have been asked to reconfigure the interior of a three-room apartment of about sixty square meters in Turin to accommodate a new type of home who Sigue leyendo

Five Cities Elevated by UNESCO “City of Design” Status

Dundee, Bilbao, Curitiba, Helsinki and Turin are often considered the cultural epicenters of their respected countries. Therefore it is no surprise that these five metropolises are the latest to achieve UNESCO’s City of Design status. Joining a list of 12 other cities,… Sigue leyendo

Casa Y / F:L Architetti

Architects: F:L Architetti
Location: Turin, Italy
Area: 420.0 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Daniele Domenicali, Fabrizio Caudana

From the architect. Set in the hills just outside Turin in northwest italy, this family home is han exercise in combining elegance with rationality and certified energy efficiency. Tucked into the hillside, this discreet volume is regularly marked out by narrow extrema stairs connecting the two levels. at basement level, a central distribution passage leads off to a garage, study, library, sauna and children’s playroom.

On the upper floor, the programme creates a deliberate contrast between the living area – a large environment whose ample loggia projects outwards from the rest of the building nestled into the sloping terrain – and a night zone overlooking the valley on the south side. A long narrow corridor forms the distribution circuit, its fair-faced concrete walls lit by shafts of light from a skylight running the full length of the passage way. Tall narrow windows at the end of the corridors of both east and west wings are a natural continuation of the skylight, giving views onto the landscape outside. Slanting shafts of light also offset the smooth white concrete walls of an internal staircase whose graduated coloured steps and central position – hung from the ceiling slab – turn it into a striking interior décor feature.

The bedrooms on the southeast side give onto the only piece of flat grassy ground. a boardwalk made from recycled formwork forms a patio area in front of each room. The fair-faced concrete of the walls also forms the bathtubs, contrasting to great effect with the satin-finish steel faucets and stone washbasins. In the night zone, each environment has its own ‘water zone’. Sunscreens of horizontal cor-ten slats shielding the full- height glazed façades open out 900 to create a secluded area in front of each room. Slat inclination has been calculated on the basis of the sun’s summer and winter angles for optimum shielding.

Deceptively simple, the building’s geometry is based on refinement and elegance. This is evidenced by the juxtaposition of materials like fair- faced concrete and steel, and the contrasting textures and finish of the raw concrete walls: silky smooth on the lower floor on account of the steel formwork used, and rough and rustic on the upper floor, patterned by timber formwork. Contrasting textures are also a feature of the interiors. Interior doorsmade from stripped formwork add to this juxtaposition.

Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Daniele Domenicali
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Daniele Domenicali
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Daniele Domenicali
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Daniele Domenicali
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Daniele Domenicali
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Daniele Domenicali
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Fabrizio Caudana
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Daniele Domenicali
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Daniele Domenicali
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Daniele Domenicali
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Daniele Domenicali
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Daniele Domenicali
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Daniele Domenicali
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Fabrizio Caudana
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Fabrizio Caudana
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Fabrizio Caudana
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Fabrizio Caudana
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Fabrizio Caudana
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Daniele Domenicali
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Fabrizio Caudana
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Daniele Domenicali
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Fabrizio Caudana
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Daniele Domenicali
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Fabrizio Caudana
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Daniele Domenicali
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Daniele Domenicali
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Fabrizio Caudana
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Fabrizio Caudana
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Fabrizio Caudana
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Fabrizio Caudana
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Fabrizio Caudana
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Fabrizio Caudana
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Fabrizio Caudana
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Fabrizio Caudana
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Fabrizio Caudana
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Fabrizio Caudana
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Fabrizio Caudana
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Fabrizio Caudana
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Fabrizio Caudana
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Fabrizio Caudana
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Fabrizio Caudana
Casa Y / F:L Architetti © Daniele Domenicali
Casa Y / F:L Architetti Floor Plan

Casa Y / F:L Architetti originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 03 Sep 2013.

send to Twitter | Share on Facebook | What do you think about this?

Campus de la universidad de Turin | Foster + Partners

Campus de la universidad de Turin 1

Foster + Partners han completado una estructura radical del campus de la universidad de Turín. Una composición de bandas de metal cepillado y el cielo de reflexión de vidrio, el nuevo edificio configurado para acomodar a 5000 estudiantes. El diseño consolida las facultades de derecho y ciencias políticas en los dos volúmenes unidos por un mismo techo de palio. Con una profundidad determinada por el análisis de la trayectoria solar, el gran voladizo es una estrategia de enfriamiento pasiva particularmente eficaz; combinado con los sistemas de construcción inteligentes y calefacción tri-generación y la refrigeración, la estructura requiere 20 por ciento menos de energía. El patio emplea a 7.200 adoquines fotocatalíticos que ayudan a neutralizar el movimiento de los contaminantes como el polvo. Rodeada por un meandro verde “del filósofo a pie ‘, el diseño fomenta el movimiento de peatones mediante la vinculación de las vías y fácil acceso a los servicios de autobuses de cercanías y, sin dejar de ofrecer terrazas ajardinadas y espacios de estudio luminosos y tranquilos.

Campus de la universidad de Turin 1
Campus de la universidad de Turin 2
Campus de la universidad de Turin 3
Campus de la universidad de Turin 4
Campus de la universidad de Turin 5
Campus de la universidad de Turin 6
Campus de la universidad de Turin 7
Campus de la universidad de Turin 8
Campus de la universidad de Turin 9
Campus de la universidad de Turin 10
Campus de la universidad de Turin 11
Campus de la universidad de Turin 12
Campus de la universidad de Turin 13
Campus de la universidad de Turin 14
Campus de la universidad de Turin 15
Campus de la universidad de Turin 16
Campus de la universidad de Turin 17
Campus de la universidad de Turin 18
Campus de la universidad de Turin 19
Campus de la universidad de Turin 20
Campus de la universidad de Turin 21
Campus de la universidad de Turin 22
Campus de la universidad de Turin 23
Campus de la universidad de Turin 24
Campus de la universidad de Turin 25
Campus de la universidad de Turin 26
Campus de la universidad de Turin 27
Campus de la universidad de Turin 28

Parco Dora by Latz + Partner LandschaftsArchitekten (DE)

The Parco Dora project in Turin, Italy, designed by Latz + Partner Landschaftsarchitekten; photo © Ornella Orlandini

Urban regeneration reaches soaring heights at the Parco Dora in Turin, Italy, where German landscape-architectural office Latz + Partner have created a park that gives the city’s inhabitants a new public space to encounter and enjoy, while referencing Turin’s proud industrial heritage. The site – which was formerly home to the Fiat Ferriere Piemontesi steel […]

Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners

Architects: Foster + Partners, Marco Visconti
Location: Torino, Italy
Project Manager: Piero Cornaglia, Antonio Presicce, Aldo Celano, Sabrina Gambino
Design Team: David Nelson, Gerard Evenden, John Blythe, Martin Castle, Martina Meluzzi, Giulia Galiberti, Marilu Sicoli
Foster + Partners Team: David Nelson, Gerard Evenden, Giulia Galiberti
Year: 2013
Photographs: Courtesy of Nigel Young – Foster + Partners, Michele D’Ottavio, David Vicario

Civil Works Supervision: Cosimo Turvani, Benedetto Camerana, Carlo Chierto, Franco Mellano, Lorenzo Buonomo
Structural Works Supervision: Francesco Ossola
Electrical Services Supervision: Roberto Pomè
Mechanical Services Supervision: Marco Lazzerini
Quantity Surveying: Carlo Chierto
Quality Control : Roberta Cocchiaro
Contractors: Codelfa SpA, Edart SpA, Gozzo Impianti SpA
Subcontractors: Sile costruzioni Srl, La.ga.fer Snc, Schindler SpA, Stalbau Pichler Srl, Canobbio Spa, Focchi SpA, Coiver Srl, BC spazi Srl, Ares Line SpA, Miodino Srl, Lindab Srl, Borio Giacomo Srl

From the architect. Uniting the faculties of Law and Political Science within a single, modern campus for 5,000 students, the project has created flexible new facilities for Turin University, as well as establishing new connections between the institution and wider community. The design links the former Italgas site on the southern bank of the River Dora with the neighbourhood of Borgo Rossini, regenerating a formerly industrial quarter close to the historic heart of the city, and turning the former source of Turin’s energy into an educational powerhouse to drive future prosperity.

The design is a modern interpretation of the traditional cloistered quadrangle, formed of two linked buildings, unified by a single roof canopy and arranged around a central courtyard. A new four-storey library is located on the northern edge of the site, parallel to the River Dora, with the Law and Political Science faculties to the south – each faculty has its own entrance from the central courtyard. The ground floor accommodates lecture halls, circulation and social spaces, with teaching and faculty rooms in the quieter levels above.

The first floor is visible as a mezzanine in the double-height entrance atrium to each faculty, animating the linear route that runs the entire length of the building. A second floor balcony incorporates entrances, as well as seating and informal break out spaces and a roof garden at the top of the Political Science faculty provides a quiet space for study. Floor plates are flexible to support changes in teaching priorities, and an innovative design for the 500-seat auditorium allows it to be split in two, with 250 seats in each side.

Sensitively combining existing and efficient new structures, some of the site’s historic buildings have been refurbished to house a café and student services – the former Piccolo Italgas building signals the main entrance to the campus, reached via the revitalised Via Vegezzi gardens. The masterplan creates a traffic-free oasis in the heart of a city plagued by congestion – vehicle access is from Corso Farini, where a covered gateway provides a sheltered, accessible route to the library and faculty buildings.

Establishing a lush, park setting, the buildings are encircled by a sequence of new green spaces, squares and open courtyards, inviting people into the campus. The landscape includes a meandering ‘philosopher’s walk’, as well as new riverside paths and pedestrian routes that promote movement and life through the site and link with local rail and bus services. In addition, more than 7,200 square metres of photocatalytic paving tiles have been used in the hard landscaping to help neutralise the polluting effects of dust.

The buildings incorporate a number of energy saving features, from passive strategies such as the overhanging roof, whose depth is determined by solar path analysis, to addressing the embodied energy of materials – the design team specified FSC-certified wood throughout, including Ajus timber for the acoustic ceiling panels in the library and sustainable bamboo flooring for the graduation hall. The combination of natural and artificial lighting reduces energy use by almost 20 percent, intelligent building control systems ensure operational efficiency and a Tri-generation source provides heating and cooling, while requiring 20 percent less energy than individual plant facilities.

Gerard Evenden, Senior Partner, Foster + Partners: “As with a number of our education projects, one of the central aims of our design for Turin University was to bring a social, collegiate environment to the campus with new public spaces and shared community facilities. Placing the refectory, bookshop and café at the heart of the site has helped to create a destination in this formerly industrial area, and the combination of new and refurbished buildings provide landmarks for the site. The project also shows our commitment to sustainable design – like the Masdar Institute, the first building of its kind to be completely solar powered, Turin’s buildings feature a number of passive and active strategies to cut waste and reduce energy, and the pedestrian friendly green space is an oasis in the heart of a busy city.”

Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners Courtesy of Nigel Young - Foster + Partners
Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners © Michele D'Ottavio
Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners © David Vicario
Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners Courtesy of Nigel Young - Foster + Partners
Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners Courtesy of Nigel Young - Foster + Partners
Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners © David Vicario
Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners © David Vicario
Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners © David Vicario
Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners © David Vicario
Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners © David Vicario
Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners © David Vicario
Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners © David Vicario
Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners © Michele D'Ottavio
Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners © Michele D'Ottavio
Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners Courtesy of Nigel Young - Foster + Partners
Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners © Michele D'Ottavio
Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners Courtesy of Nigel Young - Foster + Partners
Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners Courtesy of Nigel Young - Foster + Partners
Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners Courtesy of Nigel Young - Foster + Partners
Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners Courtesy of Nigel Young - Foster + Partners
Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners Courtesy of Nigel Young - Foster + Partners
Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners © Michele D'Ottavio
Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners
Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners
Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners
Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners
Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners
Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners
Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners

Campus Luigi Einaudi / Marco Visconti & Foster + Partners originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 31 Jul 2013.

send to Twitter | Share on Facebook | What do you think about this?

Sempla Offices / DAP Studio

Architects: DAP Studio
Location: Turin, Italy
Architect In Charge: DAP Studio
Structure: Studio Nairotti
Year: 2012
Photographs: Barbara Corsico

The Sempla offices in Turin are housed in an old factory that has been transformed. We decided to  crystallize and preserve the traces of  the past and its degradation, enhancing the power of the contrast between the new and the old.

The thing that strikes you when you enter this office is the very strong, constant but delicate, dialogue that is established between the remnants of the factory’s past and the new identity that has occupied the space with its new way of working and its objectives. This silent interchange marks the passage from the industrial world to the advanced tertiary economy, fully representing the transformations underway and largely having already occurred in the city of Turin.

Sempla is a company that deals with Information Technology. It is a system integrator that is active throughout Italy with resources of over five hundred people. They needed to structure the space in such a way as to have “private” areas, such as meeting rooms, and freer “public” areas configured as open spaces, where the prevailing logic, instead of an assigned place, would be flexibility in terms of capacity and distribution of activities.

So what they needed, more than a “traditional” office was a place that functioned as a base camp and mainly a meeting area. The project sought to respond to these multiple needs, creating a space with barriers, more logical than physical, that allow us to maintain their way of working while reducing disturbance among the various teams.

We conceived large open spaces within which we could integrate more private areas, imagined almost as the sites of work performed by distinct and separate entities, as “other” places that could respond to particular needs of the work team. In the end, The plan is not based on the design of the work station, the chair-and-desk, but rather on the construction of relations.

Some functions –  private offices, break area, meeting rooms –  are included in new volumes that are placed freely within the perimeter of the factory.

These white elements have simple forms and different heights, so that the industrial building is always perceptible in all its strength: above volumes, in fact, the structure of the factory continues uninterrupted and the spatiality of the building is not altered.

Walking around the office, one has the feeling of being in an urban landscape in miniature with all its open and closed spaces, social spaces and private spaces. And this is a very powerful image.

We started with the intention of creating a sort of labyrinth in which the meeting points were unexpected, something to be discovered with each new encounter. Naturally we thought about a hierarchy of paths, separated on the basis of dimensions into principal and secondary routes, as is typical in a city. However, we also wanted those who lived in these spaces to be able to choose freely, according to their personality, needs, and desires, what path to follow, without showing them a predetermined route. During the design phase we dedicated a great deal of attention to creating variability that would favour this process because all the random or subjective choices of pathway may lead to unusual or unexpected meetings between people who may belong to different teams.

This is something which we feel represents an essential factor for Sempla. A fundamental part of the work is based precisely on dialogue and the exchange of ideas. The pathways intersect strategic meeting points which, on the spatial level, generate an “exchange of energies”, intermediate areas that are distinct from strictly working spaces, spaces which facilitate dialogue and informal relations.

Sempla Offices / DAP Studio © Barbara Corsico
Sempla Offices / DAP Studio © Barbara Corsico
Sempla Offices / DAP Studio © Barbara Corsico
Sempla Offices / DAP Studio © Barbara Corsico
Sempla Offices / DAP Studio © Barbara Corsico
Sempla Offices / DAP Studio © Barbara Corsico
Sempla Offices / DAP Studio © Barbara Corsico
Sempla Offices / DAP Studio © Barbara Corsico
Sempla Offices / DAP Studio © Barbara Corsico
Sempla Offices / DAP Studio © Barbara Corsico
Sempla Offices / DAP Studio © Barbara Corsico
Sempla Offices / DAP Studio Plan
Sempla Offices / DAP Studio Plan
Sempla Offices / DAP Studio Section
Sempla Offices / DAP Studio Section
Sempla Offices / DAP Studio Section
Sempla Offices / DAP Studio Detail
Sempla Offices / DAP Studio Concept

Sempla Offices / DAP Studio originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 28 Apr 2013.

send to Twitter | Share on Facebook | What do you think about this?

Design Good Enough To Eat: A Boutique Bakery By Daniela Colli

Project:  Vyta Boulangerie Italiana Turin

Architect:  COLLIDANIELARCHITETTO

Location:  Turin, Italy

Italian architect Daniela Colli has taken on quite a difficult set of commissions—designing a chain of high-end bakeries in Italy’s busiest and most iconic train stations from Turin to Naples. The “boutique chain” or franchise is a new territory for architects that demands the creation of a unified brand, without resorting to identical, cookie-cutter design. All locations of Vyta Boulangerie feature warm oak and jet-black Corian interiors, though each store offers a different spatial experience.

Read more about this project in the Architizer database!

Images courtesy Matteo Piazza