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Shanghai West Bund Biennial Pavilions / SHL Architects

Architects: Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Location: Shanghai, China
Area: 240 sqm
Photographs: Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects

From the architect. The contribution of schmidt hammer lassen architects consists of an art installation pavilion, The Cloud, and a composition of pavilions containing support facilities including a café, a gallery and a bookshop. The pavilions are placed adjacent to one of two industrial cranes on the Xuhui West Bank Riverside. The tall crane stands as an icon that people all over the world can recognize and relate to and symbolizes balance, performance and gravity. The aim of the art installation pavilion, The Cloud, is to amplify and contrast these qualities.

“The Cloud pavilion is the quintessence of lightness, immateriality and fuzziness,” explained Kristian Lars Ahlmark, partner at schmidt hammer lassen architects. “By hanging hundreds of white ropes from the pavilion’s ceiling, an effect is created where The Cloud is always changing. Visitors moving or a light breeze creates a subtle movement of the ropes, underlining the organic nature of the installation and the immateriality of the space. In Chinese culture, a cloud is an important symbol and a sign of good fortune.” By following the path along the riverside, visitors are led to The Cloud and can walk through it as part of their stroll through the biennial area.

A clear visual connection to the history and the industrial nature of the site is created by the support facility pavilions. These are clad in Corten steel. Their colour and texture underline the pavilions’ relation to the industrial heritage. The shape and orientation of the pavilions were determined by the views towards the nearby bridge, the crane and the river. While The Cloud is intended for experience, interaction and activity, the support facility pavilions are for contemplation, rest and relaxation.

“We have collaborated with the client, Xuhui Development Corporation, on a number of projects in and around the West Bank site in Shanghai and these projects are all still in design development. The biennial pavilions, however, were conceived, designed and built in only three months, which is a massive achievement and a sign of good collaboration between the client, Tongji University and schmidt hammer lassen architects,” stated Chris Hardie, associate partner and head of schmidt hammer lassen architects’ Shanghai office.

The Shanghai West Bund Biennial for Architecture and Contemporary Art is promoting Shanghai as a centre for architecture and fine art. Yung Ho Chang (Zhang Yonghe), former head of the Department of Architecture at MIT and one of China’s most respected architects, is the overall curator for the biennial, which will run from 19 October to 19 December 2013.

schmidt hammer lassen architects has just relocated to larger office facilities in Shanghai and has experienced an increasing success in Asia. Current projects include Green Valley, a sustainable regeneration project on the former Shanghai World Expo site, a headquarters for the Ningbo Daily Media Group and a redevelopment of a former coal storage building, which will become a new art gallery and museum for an international art dealer.

Shanghai West Bund Biennial Pavilions / SHL Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Shanghai West Bund Biennial Pavilions / SHL Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Shanghai West Bund Biennial Pavilions / SHL Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Shanghai West Bund Biennial Pavilions / SHL Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Shanghai West Bund Biennial Pavilions / SHL Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Shanghai West Bund Biennial Pavilions / SHL Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Shanghai West Bund Biennial Pavilions / SHL Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Shanghai West Bund Biennial Pavilions / SHL Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Shanghai West Bund Biennial Pavilions / SHL Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Shanghai West Bund Biennial Pavilions / SHL Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects

Shanghai West Bund Biennial Pavilions / SHL Architects originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 04 Nov 2013.

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Urban Mountain Team Wins Nordic Built Challenge in Norway

Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects, together with LOOP Architects, COWI Denmark and Norway, Transsolar Energitechnik and Vugge til Vugge Denmark, has won the Nordic Build Challenge in Norway with their innovative scheme, Urban Mountain. The winning proposal, which would be Norway’s tallest building, seeks to refurbish and extend an existing 50,000 square-meter office tower in central Oslo into 79,000 square-meter sustainable icon. Not only would the building be the first Norwegian high-rise to utilize natural ventilation, but the design would employ Cradle to Cradle principles and BREEAM Outstanding certification targets to significantly reduce the building’s energy consumption and CO2 footprint. 

Continue reading to learn more…

If realized, Urban Mountain would recycle as much as 90% of its demolished existing materials into new and upgraded building materials, 80% of which would be directly used on the newly refurbished building. For example, all façade elements from the existing building would be re-used in the new façade design. Furthermore, the design concept operates with measurable C2C goals in areas of flexibility, biodiversity and recycling of water, heat and organic waste.

“An important part of this project is to allow the sustainable measures to be visible to the users and the city, hereby raising awareness of how the building works. For instance, when you look at the building from the outside the façade is characterized by a series of ‘green lungs’,” explains founding partner at schmidt hammer lassen architects, John Lassen.

The “green lungs” proposed to be an innovative part of the natural air intake in the building. With the use of regionally found plants, the green lungs would contribute to enhance biodiversity locally and to create a better and healthier indoor climate. These plants would clean, humidify and reduce the CO2-concentration of the incoming air for the comfort of the staff and visitors.

In addition to this, solar chimneys would run from the bottom to the top of the building. A greenhouse on the rooftop would capture and reuse the excess heat of the building and the solar heat gain of the solar chimneys. This would result in a recognizable building design – a sustainable landmark in the urban setting of the Oslo skyline.

Another example of visible sustainable solutions in the building is the innovative ice storage, which would be viewed through a large window by people going to and from the metro station. The more than 1000 cubic meters ice storage would be used as a heat source in an adapted heat pump design and as a source of direct cooling during the summer.

To integrate the office building into the local community at street level, public access would be given through an Urban Green Mall, selling healthy quality food and locally produced products. Here, people could meet and interact in the large atria, on terraces, in cafés and restaurants.

By winning the Nordic Built Challenge in Norway, the design team behind Urban Mountain has become one of the five teams in the running to become the overall winner of the Nordic Built Challenge Award with a prize of one million NOK. The overall winner will be announced on October 17, 2013.

Architects: Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects, Vugge til Vugge Denmark, LOOP Architects, COWI Denmark, COWI Norway, Transsolar Energitechnik GmbH
Design Team: schmidt hammer lassen architects, LOOP Architects, COWI Denmark, COWI Norway, Transsolar Energitechnik GmbH, Vugge til Vugge Denmark
Client: Entra Eiendom AS
Existing Area: 50,875 m2
Extension Area: 28,375 m2
Total Area: 79,250 m2
Year: 2013
Photographs: schmidt hammer lassen architects

Urban Mountain Team Wins Nordic Built Challenge in Norway © schmidt hammer lassen architects
Urban Mountain Team Wins Nordic Built Challenge in Norway © schmidt hammer lassen architects
Urban Mountain Team Wins Nordic Built Challenge in Norway © schmidt hammer lassen architects
Urban Mountain Team Wins Nordic Built Challenge in Norway © schmidt hammer lassen architects
Urban Mountain Team Wins Nordic Built Challenge in Norway © schmidt hammer lassen architects
Urban Mountain Team Wins Nordic Built Challenge in Norway © schmidt hammer lassen architects
Urban Mountain Team Wins Nordic Built Challenge in Norway © schmidt hammer lassen architects
Urban Mountain Team Wins Nordic Built Challenge in Norway © schmidt hammer lassen architects
Urban Mountain Team Wins Nordic Built Challenge in Norway © schmidt hammer lassen architects
Urban Mountain Team Wins Nordic Built Challenge in Norway © schmidt hammer lassen architects
Urban Mountain Team Wins Nordic Built Challenge in Norway © schmidt hammer lassen architects
Urban Mountain Team Wins Nordic Built Challenge in Norway © schmidt hammer lassen architects
Urban Mountain Team Wins Nordic Built Challenge in Norway © schmidt hammer lassen architects
Urban Mountain Team Wins Nordic Built Challenge in Norway © schmidt hammer lassen architects
Urban Mountain Team Wins Nordic Built Challenge in Norway © schmidt hammer lassen architects
Urban Mountain Team Wins Nordic Built Challenge in Norway © schmidt hammer lassen architects
Urban Mountain Team Wins Nordic Built Challenge in Norway © schmidt hammer lassen architects
Urban Mountain Team Wins Nordic Built Challenge in Norway © schmidt hammer lassen architects
Urban Mountain Team Wins Nordic Built Challenge in Norway © schmidt hammer lassen architects
Urban Mountain Team Wins Nordic Built Challenge in Norway © schmidt hammer lassen architects
Urban Mountain Team Wins Nordic Built Challenge in Norway © schmidt hammer lassen architects

Urban Mountain Team Wins Nordic Built Challenge in Norway originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 13 Sep 2013.

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New Hospital Hvidovre Extension Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects

schmidt hammer lassen architects, in collaboration with aarhus arkitekterne, has just been announced as the winner of the competition to design the new extension of the New Hospital Hvidovre in Denmark. The new 30,000-square-meter extension consists of an emergency ward, a pediatrics ward and obstetrics and cardiology departments. Expected to be completed in 2019, clarity, flexibility, respect, green garden spaces and spatial variation are the key features to this winning design. More images and architects’ description after the break.

In this winning design, special attention has been paid to creating a unique main entrance to the hospital and to creating an architectural interaction between the existing hospital and the new extension. By understanding the building principles of the existing hospital we designed the extension to become a continuation of the existing structure. The architectural idea is to develop the concrete base into a flexible and respectful new interpretation while maintaining the orthogonal geometry. The design of the extension is organic and empathetic, which makes it vibrant, expressive and dramatic.

The new green garden spaces will act as structuring focal points in the new extension. They connect all floors and bring daylight to the lowest level, where the parking area and the new main entrance are placed. As a consequence of the majority of visitors arriving at the hospital by car, the new main entrance is placed level with the parking area, so one moves up from below and through the building.

On arrival, all patients, relatives and employees must feel welcome and accommodated. People must be received in a proper manner, which leaves them in no doubt about where to go. We created a new platform for arrival which angles towards the hospital in one smooth movement and leads below the building, where the green garden spaces will act as way-finding elements.

The judges’ report states: “The proposal demonstrates humility towards the particular cultural heritage of this hospital and is also an innovative example of the difficult architectural and functional task it is to extend one of our country’s finest hospitals.”

This proposal was so outstanding compared with the other six competition proposals that the jury chose to appoint only one winning proposal to proceed to the second round.

Architects: schmidt hammer lassen architects
Location: Hvidovre, Denmark
Consultants: aarhus arkitekterne
Sub-Consultants: Søren Jensen Rådgivende Ingeniørfirma, Royal Haskoning, Kragh & Berglund Landscape architecture and Urban Design
Client: The Capital Region of Denmark
Area: 30,560 m2
Competition Status: 1st prize in restricted competition 
Competition Year: 2013
Expected Completion: 2019

New Hospital Hvidovre Extension Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
New Hospital Hvidovre Extension Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
New Hospital Hvidovre Extension Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
New Hospital Hvidovre Extension Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
New Hospital Hvidovre Extension Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
New Hospital Hvidovre Extension Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects

New Hospital Hvidovre Extension Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 08 Jun 2013.

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New Hospital Hvidovre Extension Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects

schmidt hammer lassen architects, in collaboration with aarhus arkitekterne, has just been announced as the winner of the competition to design the new extension of the New Hospital Hvidovre in Denmark. The new 30,000-square-meter extension consists of an emergency ward, a pediatrics ward and obstetrics and cardiology departments. Expected to be completed in 2019, clarity, flexibility, respect, green garden spaces and spatial variation are the key features to this winning design. More images and architects’ description after the break.

In this winning design, special attention has been paid to creating a unique main entrance to the hospital and to creating an architectural interaction between the existing hospital and the new extension. By understanding the building principles of the existing hospital we designed the extension to become a continuation of the existing structure. The architectural idea is to develop the concrete base into a flexible and respectful new interpretation while maintaining the orthogonal geometry. The design of the extension is organic and empathetic, which makes it vibrant, expressive and dramatic.

The new green garden spaces will act as structuring focal points in the new extension. They connect all floors and bring daylight to the lowest level, where the parking area and the new main entrance are placed. As a consequence of the majority of visitors arriving at the hospital by car, the new main entrance is placed level with the parking area, so one moves up from below and through the building.

On arrival, all patients, relatives and employees must feel welcome and accommodated. People must be received in a proper manner, which leaves them in no doubt about where to go. We created a new platform for arrival which angles towards the hospital in one smooth movement and leads below the building, where the green garden spaces will act as way-finding elements.

The judges’ report states: “The proposal demonstrates humility towards the particular cultural heritage of this hospital and is also an innovative example of the difficult architectural and functional task it is to extend one of our country’s finest hospitals.”

This proposal was so outstanding compared with the other six competition proposals that the jury chose to appoint only one winning proposal to proceed to the second round.

Architects: schmidt hammer lassen architects
Location: Hvidovre, Denmark
Consultants: aarhus arkitekterne
Sub-Consultants: Søren Jensen Rådgivende Ingeniørfirma, Royal Haskoning, Kragh & Berglund Landscape architecture and Urban Design
Client: The Capital Region of Denmark
Area: 30,560 m2
Competition Status: 1st prize in restricted competition 
Competition Year: 2013
Expected Completion: 2019

New Hospital Hvidovre Extension Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
New Hospital Hvidovre Extension Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
New Hospital Hvidovre Extension Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
New Hospital Hvidovre Extension Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
New Hospital Hvidovre Extension Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
New Hospital Hvidovre Extension Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects

New Hospital Hvidovre Extension Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 08 Jun 2013.

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Green Valley Project Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects

Just this past Thursday, schmidt hammer lassen architects, East China Architecture and Design Institute, and Shanghai Expo Construction Development Company celebrated the ground breaking for, and start of construction of, the new Green Valley project on the site of the former 2010 Shanghai Expo. Located immediately next to the iconic Chinese pavilion, the architects won the international competition to design this 50,000-square-meter project last year. This project aims to become a new central urban development in Shanghai, integrating new sustainable solutions in both the urban design and the individual buildings on the site. More images and architects’ description after the break.

The Shanghai World Expo in 2010 placed emphasis on the future sustainable development of the formal industrial dockyard area of the city. The Expo event itself transformed this area into a new destination for the city. What remains after the Expo event is over and most of the pavilions are torn down is a strong and well-developed infrastructure with green parks, promenades and cultural attractions. The Green Valley project will mark the heart of the new permanent development of the site.

The new Green Valley development, with offices, shops and restaurants, will become a new destination not only for the main users of the area but for people from Shanghai in general. It will be a green, sustainable landmark for the city and for the entire region. It is a great honor to be part of this development on such a prominent site.

A central open space composed of greenery, water and a soft landscape runs through the middle of the site. It functions as the spine of the Green Valley. This open space splits the site equally into two, with two major buildings located on each side. The buildings have a large, connected structure, tightly choreographed to set a new scene for urban life. It will act as a guiding element in the development of the entire area.

The buildings are designed to offer modern office facilities with a high standard of finish, flexibility, consideration of environmental issues, and low operating costs. The design expresses openness and accessibility, with a strong identity. The green hanging gardens inside the open atriums will be visible from the surrounding areas, and the people working in the buildings will be offered a great view to the greenery and city beyond.

The project is designed so that, despite the monumental scale of the site, it relates to the human scale in the public spaces, giving a diverse, vibrant and inclusive community. The Green Valley development is expected to be completed in 2015.

Architects: schmidt hammer lassen architects
Location: Shanghai, China
Local Architect: ECADI (East China Architecture and Design Institute)
Client: Shanghai EXPO Construction Development Co. Ltd.
Competition: 1st prize in invited international competition; 2012
Area: 50,000 m²
Status: Construction period 2013 – 2015

Green Valley Project Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Green Valley Project Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Green Valley Project Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Green Valley Project Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Green Valley Project Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Green Valley Project Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Green Valley Project Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Green Valley Project Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Green Valley Project Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Green Valley Project Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects model 01
Green Valley Project Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects model 02
Green Valley Project Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects model 03
Green Valley Project Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects model 04

Green Valley Project Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 03 Jun 2013.

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Ny Anstalt Correctional Facility Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects

Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects, in collaboration with Friis & Moltke, just won the competition to design the Ny Anstalt correctional facility in Nuuk, Greenland. The 8,000 square meter facility is the first such facility in Greenland, focusing on the contrast between beauty and roughness as a guiding theme for the project. This concept is also present in the choice of materials: concrete, wood and corten steel, which is rooted in a desire to adapt the complex to the landscape. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Openness, light, views, security and flexibility are the leading values behind the design. Our project matches the unique and beautiful surroundings and supports the focus of the Danish Prison and Probation Service on the balance between punishment and rehabilitation. The whole idea behind the project is to add qualities to the complex that will enhance rehabilitation and diminish physical and psychological violence.

The belief that the physical surroundings have an important impact on human behavior and the will to collaborate has motivated the client to initiate a project of high architectural quality. Moreover, the competition aimed at creating a good working environment for the employees.

The winning proposal consists of five residential units with rooms for 76 inmates, in both a ‘closed’ and an ‘open’ section. The project also includes work and leisure facilities as well as spaces for visitors to the inmates. In addition, there is an administration division and various technical and security installations.

Architecturally the facility is composed of accurately shaped blocks, which in their positioning follow the natural contours of the rocky landscape. In our appreciation of the lines and character of the landscape, we create a project which in orientation and scale appears subordinate to its surroundings. We make a place with an identity – a small, well-defined area in a magnificent and vast natural setting.

The design of the residential units offers an experience of the changing daylight and the surroundings. The contrasts of nature – snow, ice, rocks, moss, blue sky, sun, night, day, birds and other animals – are brought into the complex by the way the buildings are arranged in relation to each other. Thus, a panoramic window in the common lounge area carries nature into each residential unit, and the inmates have an unrestricted view towards the landscape from the windows in their cells.

Architects: Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects, in collaboration with Friis & Moltke
Engineer: Rambøll A/S
Landscape Architect: Møller & Grønborg
Full Service Contractor: Rambøll A/S
Client: Danish Ministry of Justice, Danish Prison and Probation Service
Competition Status: 1st prize in restricted competition
Area: 8,387 m2
Year: 2013

Ny Anstalt Correctional Facility Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Ny Anstalt Correctional Facility Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Ny Anstalt Correctional Facility Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Ny Anstalt Correctional Facility Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Ny Anstalt Correctional Facility Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects site plan
Ny Anstalt Correctional Facility Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects ground floor plan
Ny Anstalt Correctional Facility Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects east elevation
Ny Anstalt Correctional Facility Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects west elevation
Ny Anstalt Correctional Facility Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects diagram 01
Ny Anstalt Correctional Facility Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects diagram 02

Ny Anstalt Correctional Facility Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 20 May 2013.

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Helsingborg Hospital Extension Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects

Located in the southern part of Sweden, the competition to design the 35,000 square metre extension to the Helsingborg Hospital has just been won by Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects. In cooperation with Aarhus Arkitekterne, NNE Pharmaplan and landscape architects Kragh & Berglund, the key to the whole design has been flexibility, a clear layout, variety, human scale, green courtyards and optimal conditions for daylight. The extension will include a new ward for adult psychiatry, an out-patient clinic and medical laboratories. More images and architects’ description after the break.

The building is flexible and therefore sustainable with regards to future demands for changing use and functions. It has a uniform sculptural expression, which adapts to the various functionality needs but at the same time corresponds with the scale of the surrounding buildings. The shifting and indented façade creates varying spaces and makes it possible to adapt the structure with open and closed parts depending on the functions behind it.

A hallway makes up the spine of the building and gathers together the different functions in a clear fashion. It has the double function of a dynamic urban street with a fine net of intersections, squares and views to green courtyards. In the psychiatric ward, the emphasis is on an environment that allows for both relaxation and activities. This will have both a calming and inspiring effect on the patients, who are thereby challenged in a secure setting. The layout of the ward is clear, and the green roofs establish a distinct, undisturbed landscape. The composition of the bed wards creates sheltered, inner courtyards signalling calm and safety. From the upper levels, the patients have a panoramic view over the city and Oresund, which in turn affords plenty of daylight in the rooms.

The layout of the main functions of the building minimizes walking distances, optimizes daily operations and adjusts to the special needs of the different areas of activity. 

The extension to the Helsingborg Hospital is the third hospital competition won by schmidt hammer lassen architects since 2010. In 2012, the practice won the competition for the New Aalborg University Hospital as part of the Indigo consortium, and in 2010 the extension to the Kolding Hospital – both in Denmark.

Architects: Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Location: Helsingborg, Sweden
Sub-Consultants: Aarhus Arkitekterne, NNE Pharmaplan
Landscape Architects: Kragh & Berglund Stockholm
Client: Region Skåne, Regionservice (Sweden)
Area: Approx. 35,000 m2
Competition Status: 1st Prize in restricted competition
Year: 2013

Helsingborg Hospital Extension Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Helsingborg Hospital Extension Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Helsingborg Hospital Extension Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Helsingborg Hospital Extension Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Helsingborg Hospital Extension Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Helsingborg Hospital Extension Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Courtesy of Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Helsingborg Hospital Extension Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects site plan

Helsingborg Hospital Extension Winning Proposal / Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 21 Mar 2013.

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Cathedral of the Northern Lights / SHL Architects

Architects: Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Location: Alta, Norway
Engineer: Rambøll AS, Alta
Main Contractor: Ulf Kivijervi AS
Client: The Municipality of Alta
Area: 1,917 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Adam Mørk

The Crown Princess of Norway, Mette-Marit, has just inaugurated the Cathedral of the Northern Lights situated in the Norwegian town of Alta approximately 500 km north of the Arctic Circle. Even before the inauguration, the 47-metre-high cathedral, designed by schmidt hammer lassen architects in cooperation with Link Arkitektur, was perceived as a symbol and an architectural landmark for the entire area.

In 2001, when the architecture competition for the Cathedral of the Northern Lights was arranged, the city council in Alta did not just want a new church: they wanted an architectural landmark that would underline Alta’s role as a public venue from which the natural phenomenon of the northern lights could be observed.

“The Cathedral of the Northern Lights is in its design a result of the surrounding nature and local culture. The building is a landmark, which through its architecture symbolizes the extraordinary natural phenomenon of the Arctic northern lights,” explains John F. Lassen, Founding Partner at schmidt hammer lassen architects. He continues: “The cathedral reflects, both literally and metaphorically, the northern lights: ethereal, transient, poetic and beautiful. It appears as a solitary sculpture in interaction with the spectacular nature.”

The significance of the northern lights is reflected in the architecture of the cathedral. The contours of the church rise as a spiralling shape to the tip of the belfry 47 metres above the ground. The façade, clad in titanium, reflects the northern lights during the long periods of Arctic winter darkness and emphasizes the experience of the phenomenon.

Inside the main area of the cathedral, the church room creates a peaceful contrast to the dynamic exterior of the building. The materials used, raw concrete for the walls and wood for the floors, panels and ceilings, underline the Nordic context. Daylight enters the church room through tall, slim, irregularly placed windows. A skylight lights up the whole wall behind the altar creating a distinctive atmosphere in the room.

The cathedral, which can accommodate 350 people in the church room, also has administration offices, classrooms, exhibition areas and a parochial area.

The Cathedral of the Northern Lights in Alta is the latest in a row of cultural projects designed by schmidt hammer lassen architects. In September 2012, University of Aberdeen New Library in Scotland was officially opened; and in January 2013, the practice won the competition to design the New Cultural Centre and Library in Karlshamn, Sweden. Moreover, schmidt hammer lassen architects is currently working on two libraries in Canada – one in Halifax and one in Edmonton – as well as the multimedia library Dokk1 in Aarhus, Denmark. When completed in 2014, Dokk1 will be the largest public library in Scandinavia.

Cathedral of the Northern Lights / SHL Architects © Adam Mørk
Cathedral of the Northern Lights / SHL Architects © Adam Mørk
Cathedral of the Northern Lights / SHL Architects © Adam Mørk
Cathedral of the Northern Lights / SHL Architects © Adam Mørk
Cathedral of the Northern Lights / SHL Architects © Adam Mørk
Cathedral of the Northern Lights / SHL Architects © Adam Mørk
Cathedral of the Northern Lights / SHL Architects © Adam Mørk
Cathedral of the Northern Lights / SHL Architects © Adam Mørk
Cathedral of the Northern Lights / SHL Architects © Adam Mørk
Cathedral of the Northern Lights / SHL Architects © Adam Mørk
Cathedral of the Northern Lights / SHL Architects Plan
Cathedral of the Northern Lights / SHL Architects Plan
Cathedral of the Northern Lights / SHL Architects Plan
Cathedral of the Northern Lights / SHL Architects Elevation
Cathedral of the Northern Lights / SHL Architects Elevation
Cathedral of the Northern Lights / SHL Architects Section
Cathedral of the Northern Lights / SHL Architects Section

Cathedral of the Northern Lights / SHL Architects originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 12 Feb 2013.

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IBC Innovation Factory / SHL Architects

Architects: Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Location: Kolding, Denmark
Client: IBC International Business College, Kolding
Area: 12,800 sqm
Year: 2009
Photographs: Adam Mørk

The IBC Innovation Factory by schmidt hammer lassen architects is designed to support new ways of learning.  The 12,800 square metres educational building has gone through a total refurbishment and will be officially inaugurated by His Royal Highness the Prince Consort of Denmark on 6th December 2012.

The IBC Innovation Factory is the result of a refurbishment project of the paint manufacturer GORI’s factory from 1978, which set new standards for factories at the time. In the spirit of the original factory, schmidt hammer lassen architects, in collaboration with International Business College (IBC) Kolding, has created the settings for a ground-breaking and creative learning environment, aiming to become the world’s best. The ambition is to be a training camp for future innovators.

“With the acquisition of the GORI factory in the summer of 2010, the IBC gained access to a unique physical environment characterized by an impressive pioneering spirit and vision. It was the first factory plant in Denmark to unite production and management in one large room, allowing visual connection between the two,” explained Founding Partner at schmidt hammer lassen architects, Mr John Foldbjerg Lassen, and he continued, “The large paint tanks were decorated by the French artist Jean Dewasne, in the conviction that art in the workplace would inspire employees and provide a better working environment. The same idea inspired the incorporation of badminton courts and Ping-Pong tables on the production floor for the employees.”

The main task for schmidt hammer lassen architects has been to preserve and emphasize the building’s existing qualities and transform the facilities into an innovative learning environment. By using six elements – fire, water, greenery, light, sound and air – the concept for the new Innovation Factory was developed with an emphasis on stimulating the users’ senses. A central teaching facility in the shape of an indoor ‘landscape furniture’ designed in Douglas pine wood incorporates a variety of learning spaces and experiences.  The wooden structure, which seems to float above a surface of water, has an auditorium, places for open study, an amphitheatre, and closed podiums for group work or quiet study time. There are green plants, the sound of trickling water, birds in aviaries and plenty of daylight from the skylights above.

“Students, teachers, and the business world can meet and learn from each other in this unique setting. The building should support and inspire this encounter. The main architectural concept behind the ‘landscape furniture’ is created in that spirit. We are convinced that the experience of quality and well-being is highly conducive to creativity,” explained John Foldbjerg Lassen.

IBC Innovation Factory / SHL Architects © Adam Mørk
IBC Innovation Factory / SHL Architects © Adam Mørk
IBC Innovation Factory / SHL Architects © Adam Mørk
IBC Innovation Factory / SHL Architects © Adam Mørk
IBC Innovation Factory / SHL Architects © Adam Mørk
IBC Innovation Factory / SHL Architects © Adam Mørk
IBC Innovation Factory / SHL Architects © Adam Mørk
IBC Innovation Factory / SHL Architects © Adam Mørk

IBC Innovation Factory / SHL Architects originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 10 Dec 2012.

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IBC Innovation Factory / SHL Architects

Architects: Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
Location: Kolding, Denmark
Client: IBC International Business College, Kolding
Area: 12,800 sqm
Year: 2009
Photographs: Adam Mørk

The IBC Innovation Factory by schmidt hammer lassen architects is designed to support new ways of learning.  The 12,800 square metres educational building has gone through a total refurbishment and will be officially inaugurated by His Royal Highness the Prince Consort of Denmark on 6th December 2012.

The IBC Innovation Factory is the result of a refurbishment project of the paint manufacturer GORI’s factory from 1978, which set new standards for factories at the time. In the spirit of the original factory, schmidt hammer lassen architects, in collaboration with International Business College (IBC) Kolding, has created the settings for a ground-breaking and creative learning environment, aiming to become the world’s best. The ambition is to be a training camp for future innovators.

“With the acquisition of the GORI factory in the summer of 2010, the IBC gained access to a unique physical environment characterized by an impressive pioneering spirit and vision. It was the first factory plant in Denmark to unite production and management in one large room, allowing visual connection between the two,” explained Founding Partner at schmidt hammer lassen architects, Mr John Foldbjerg Lassen, and he continued, “The large paint tanks were decorated by the French artist Jean Dewasne, in the conviction that art in the workplace would inspire employees and provide a better working environment. The same idea inspired the incorporation of badminton courts and Ping-Pong tables on the production floor for the employees.”

The main task for schmidt hammer lassen architects has been to preserve and emphasize the building’s existing qualities and transform the facilities into an innovative learning environment. By using six elements – fire, water, greenery, light, sound and air – the concept for the new Innovation Factory was developed with an emphasis on stimulating the users’ senses. A central teaching facility in the shape of an indoor ‘landscape furniture’ designed in Douglas pine wood incorporates a variety of learning spaces and experiences.  The wooden structure, which seems to float above a surface of water, has an auditorium, places for open study, an amphitheatre, and closed podiums for group work or quiet study time. There are green plants, the sound of trickling water, birds in aviaries and plenty of daylight from the skylights above.

“Students, teachers, and the business world can meet and learn from each other in this unique setting. The building should support and inspire this encounter. The main architectural concept behind the ‘landscape furniture’ is created in that spirit. We are convinced that the experience of quality and well-being is highly conducive to creativity,” explained John Foldbjerg Lassen.

IBC Innovation Factory / SHL Architects © Adam Mørk
IBC Innovation Factory / SHL Architects © Adam Mørk
IBC Innovation Factory / SHL Architects © Adam Mørk
IBC Innovation Factory / SHL Architects © Adam Mørk
IBC Innovation Factory / SHL Architects © Adam Mørk
IBC Innovation Factory / SHL Architects © Adam Mørk
IBC Innovation Factory / SHL Architects © Adam Mørk
IBC Innovation Factory / SHL Architects © Adam Mørk

IBC Innovation Factory / SHL Architects originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 10 Dec 2012.

send to Twitter | Share on Facebook | What do you think about this?