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School in Balsiai / Sigitas Kuncevi?ius Architecture Studio

Architects: Sigitas Kuncevi?ius Architecture Studio
Location: Vilnius district municipality, Lithuania
Design Team: Sigitas Kuncevi?ius, Martynas Dagys, Loreta Kuncevi?ien?, Vilt? Jurgaitien?, Žygimantas Gudelis, Aist? Kuncevi?i?t?
Project Area: 11,400 sqm
Photographs: Raimondas Urbakavi?ius

This primary school designed for 828 pupils is the first modern school that was built from scratch in Vilnius in the 20 years since Lithuania’s independence. As the surrounding urban fabric has no cohesive urban concept, the new school was intended to give the area an unequivocal focal point. It is also intended to serve a broader function for the wider community after school hours and over weekends.

The building structure is like a chequer-board arrangements of simple, two and three-storey rectangular volumes and patios. The classrooms are located in the eastern part of the complex. Each two storey volume is ,inhabitated’ by children of a particular age, and each age group has its own enclosed courtyard. Two- and three-storey volumes on the western side contain rooms for administration and public use: laboratories, workshops, art studios, a sports hall, and a multipurposed hall, used daily as a refectory and easily transformed into a space for cultural events and meetings. The main entrance, accentuated by a sequence of timber portal frames, leads to the lobby, suffused with light coming through a glazed roof. At the opposite end of the central part of the school is a library with reading room, which is also open to the generic public.

The idea of exterior design was to reduce the scale and tie the complex into the extensive site. Each volume has different articulation of coloured panels – blue-grey, yellow-grey, red-grey – that echoes the „positive versus negative“ concept and simultaneously gives each structure its own identity. The light-hearted play of colours brightens the elevations and prevents what might otherwise have been rather sombre project.

Circular concrete columns, set back from the facades, support the weight of the floor slabs and free the elevations from their load-bearing function. The crisp, clipped edges and the positioning of the glazing flush with the facade abstracts the orthogonal volumes. It contrast to the chequered colour combination of three volumes to the east, the west-facing building adjacent to the sports fields have been articulated in a single shade of monochrome, gunmetal grey that offset the use of primary colours elsewhere. Overall, the clear, concise volumes create o modern, sleek architectural vocabulary.

The design of school interior is based on lithuanian ethno motives. Every color that was used in school has different mythological meanings. The ancient symbols are used everywhere in the school. The predominant dark grey colour, sharp lines, bare concrete, steel and glass in common spaces has the feel of order and reason. Blocks of red, yellow and blue in the flooring, walls and furniture inject a touch of liveliness. Colourful floorings of corridors and recreation areas are connected with pattern on the exterior. Predominant color in every two-storey class volume helps pupils to orientate.

The interior finishing concept is to expose and exploit maximum content of natural high quality concrete surfaces and also fragmentaly artificial-ecological materials. The walls of recreation areas are colored clay blocks with their natural texture. Finishing of sports halls is based larch wood and ecological wood-cement acoustical tiles surfaces. Colourful PVC flooring used for classes, cabinets and corridors. Architects also created original marking system for visual information. All furniture (desks, chairs, lockers) is designed for this project individually and can be used for other schools.

School in Balsiai / Sigitas Kuncevi?ius Architecture Studio © Raimondas Urbakavi?ius
School in Balsiai / Sigitas Kuncevi?ius Architecture Studio © Raimondas Urbakavi?ius
School in Balsiai / Sigitas Kuncevi?ius Architecture Studio © Raimondas Urbakavi?ius
School in Balsiai / Sigitas Kuncevi?ius Architecture Studio © Raimondas Urbakavi?ius
School in Balsiai / Sigitas Kuncevi?ius Architecture Studio © Raimondas Urbakavi?ius
School in Balsiai / Sigitas Kuncevi?ius Architecture Studio © Raimondas Urbakavi?ius
School in Balsiai / Sigitas Kuncevi?ius Architecture Studio © Raimondas Urbakavi?ius
School in Balsiai / Sigitas Kuncevi?ius Architecture Studio © Raimondas Urbakavi?ius
School in Balsiai / Sigitas Kuncevi?ius Architecture Studio © Raimondas Urbakavi?ius
School in Balsiai / Sigitas Kuncevi?ius Architecture Studio © Raimondas Urbakavi?ius
School in Balsiai / Sigitas Kuncevi?ius Architecture Studio © Raimondas Urbakavi?ius
School in Balsiai / Sigitas Kuncevi?ius Architecture Studio © Raimondas Urbakavi?ius
School in Balsiai / Sigitas Kuncevi?ius Architecture Studio © Raimondas Urbakavi?ius
School in Balsiai / Sigitas Kuncevi?ius Architecture Studio © Raimondas Urbakavi?ius
School in Balsiai / Sigitas Kuncevi?ius Architecture Studio © Raimondas Urbakavi?ius
School in Balsiai / Sigitas Kuncevi?ius Architecture Studio © Raimondas Urbakavi?ius
School in Balsiai / Sigitas Kuncevi?ius Architecture Studio © Raimondas Urbakavi?ius
School in Balsiai / Sigitas Kuncevi?ius Architecture Studio © Raimondas Urbakavi?ius
School in Balsiai / Sigitas Kuncevi?ius Architecture Studio © Raimondas Urbakavi?ius
School in Balsiai / Sigitas Kuncevi?ius Architecture Studio © Raimondas Urbakavi?ius
School in Balsiai / Sigitas Kuncevi?ius Architecture Studio © Raimondas Urbakavi?ius
School in Balsiai / Sigitas Kuncevi?ius Architecture Studio First Floor Plan 01
School in Balsiai / Sigitas Kuncevi?ius Architecture Studio Second Floor Plan 01
School in Balsiai / Sigitas Kuncevi?ius Architecture Studio Ground Floor Plan 01
School in Balsiai / Sigitas Kuncevi?ius Architecture Studio Master Plan 01
School in Balsiai / Sigitas Kuncevi?ius Architecture Studio Section 01

School in Balsiai / Sigitas Kuncevi?ius Architecture Studio originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 12 Oct 2012.

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H3 Experience Center / Nota Design Group

Architects: Nota Design Group
Location: Kunming, Yunnan, China
Project Year: 2012
Project Area: 994 sqm
Photographs: Courtesy of Nota Design Group

Isabel Flooring is an established flooring specialist in China. H3 is their foray into other wood products such as timber doors and built-in furnitures. This design exercise will attempt to portray H3 as “The Wood Specialist” and set a store identity for the brand’s countrywide expansion.

To create a new kind of shopping experience for the consumers in a highly competitive building materials market. To create a strong and memorable store identity with maximum visual impact. To portray the brand’s effort in it’s constant push for sustainable process and products. To capitalize on Isabel’s success in laminate flooring

To create H3′s image as “The Wood Specialist”, the storefront is composed of 5 different types of wood structure interlocking together in a multi-layered and articulated manner.

To portray H3′s support for the environment, all the wood on the facade are reused pinewood which is readily available in the local area.

To take advantage of the parent brand’s heritage in laminated flooring, the design used the product to “lead” customers into the other new products. A brand new “Ribbon” system of flooring sample presentation is created which brings customers from one zone to another.

With the “Ribbon” system, customers are led from one zone to another, allowing them to move in a structured yet open manner, guiding them , yet not restricting them.

The sample zones are created to allow customers to see how the different products can be matched to form different harmonious living environments to help customers solve common design dilemmas.

H3 Experience Center / Nota Design Group Courtesy of Nota Design Group
H3 Experience Center / Nota Design Group Courtesy of Nota Design Group
H3 Experience Center / Nota Design Group Courtesy of Nota Design Group
H3 Experience Center / Nota Design Group Courtesy of Nota Design Group
H3 Experience Center / Nota Design Group Courtesy of Nota Design Group
H3 Experience Center / Nota Design Group Courtesy of Nota Design Group
H3 Experience Center / Nota Design Group Courtesy of Nota Design Group
H3 Experience Center / Nota Design Group Courtesy of Nota Design Group
H3 Experience Center / Nota Design Group Courtesy of Nota Design Group
H3 Experience Center / Nota Design Group Courtesy of Nota Design Group
H3 Experience Center / Nota Design Group First Floor Plan 01
H3 Experience Center / Nota Design Group Second Floor Plan 01
H3 Experience Center / Nota Design Group Elevation 01
H3 Experience Center / Nota Design Group Elevation 02
H3 Experience Center / Nota Design Group Section 01
H3 Experience Center / Nota Design Group Section 02

H3 Experience Center / Nota Design Group originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 12 Oct 2012.

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Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects

Architects: T2.a Architects
Location: Budapest, Hungary
Architects: Gábor Turányi, Bence Turányi, Tamás Mórocz
Project Year: 2005
Photographs: Zsolt Batár, Attila Polgár

Project Area: 50,000 sqm
Landscape Design: Garten Stúdió Ltd.
Landscape Designers: István Steffler, György Szloszjár, Gabriella Vastagh
Structural Engineering: LMI Ltd.

The area around the former river harbor lies in the southern part of Buda. The territory was abandoned and heavily polluted industrial site, partially used for personal holiday purposes in the last decades of the Communist regime and in the ‘90s.

Before the current owner (property developer Öböl XI. Ltd.) acquired the site, the narrow dam was dotted with a variety of modest wooden barracks in sad condition which were home to the water police, a number of small restaurants. We proposed erecting the new pavilions on exactly the same spot as these old structures and employing a timber building typology characteristic of the waterfront. We were playing with shapes and materials, just as we were playing during the design process: we identified the buildings with names such as ‘the one with the sweater’ or ‘with the parka’ etc. So the steel frames were dressed up with light-weighted wall structures and timber facades. With their simple shape and detailing, these unpretentious little buildings radiate a certain timelessness and lightness.

The outdoor area has been also carefully landscaped and treated always in strong connection with the buildings. The environmental rehabilitation of the bay is also finished: the water is not anymore a polluted, but a living natural area.

The area as a whole has the potential to be a resounding success. The location is particularly outstanding in that it offers water views on two sides of the dam and natural access to the Danube which is a unique opportunity for the habitants of the City.

Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects © Zsolt Batár
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects © Attila Polgár
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects © Zsolt Batár
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects © Zsolt Batár
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects © Zsolt Batár
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects © Zsolt Batár
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects © Zsolt Batár
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects © Zsolt Batár
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects © Zsolt Batár
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects © Zsolt Batár
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects © Zsolt Batár
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects © Zsolt Batár
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects © Zsolt Batár
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects © Zsolt Batár
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects © Zsolt Batár
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects © Zsolt Batár
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects © Zsolt Batár
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects © Zsolt Batár
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects © Zsolt Batár
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects © Zsolt Batár
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects © Zsolt Batár
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects © Zsolt Batár
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects © Zsolt Batár
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects © Attila Polgár
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects Site Plan 01
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects Ground Floor Plan 01
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects Ground Floor Plan 02
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects Section 01
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects Section 02
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects Facade 01
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects Facade 02
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects Structure 01
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects Structure 02
Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects Structure 03

Waterfront Kopaszi Dam / T2.a Architects originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 12 Oct 2012.

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Sense / Kazutoshi Imanaga

Architects: Kazutoshi Imanaga
Location: Tokyo, Japan
Project Year: 2012
Project Area: 340 sqm
Photographs: Courtesy of Imanaga Environmental Planning Office

The aim for the architectural concept of this house is to appeal to the senses – not only to “seeing” but also to “hearing” the sound of water, “smelling” the greenery and “feeling” the breeze in the garden, the warmth of the sunshine and the volume of the air.

The built forms and the outdoor spaces are positioned alternately with boundaries simply of transparent glass. Hence, the effect of a continuum space with an ambiguity between the exterior and the interior.

The main living area is one big space, about 50 tatami mats in size. This floor plan is subtly divided into four smaller areas by the use of furniture, a fireplace and a change in ceiling height.

The luxuriousness of the “SENSE” house is not in the bigness of the space. It is in the creation of an architectural environment which encourages a deeply sensory existence.

Sense / Kazutoshi Imanaga Courtesy of Imanaga Environmental Planning Office
Sense / Kazutoshi Imanaga Courtesy of Imanaga Environmental Planning Office
Sense / Kazutoshi Imanaga Courtesy of Imanaga Environmental Planning Office
Sense / Kazutoshi Imanaga Courtesy of Imanaga Environmental Planning Office
Sense / Kazutoshi Imanaga Courtesy of Imanaga Environmental Planning Office
Sense / Kazutoshi Imanaga Courtesy of Imanaga Environmental Planning Office
Sense / Kazutoshi Imanaga Courtesy of Imanaga Environmental Planning Office
Sense / Kazutoshi Imanaga Courtesy of Imanaga Environmental Planning Office
Sense / Kazutoshi Imanaga Courtesy of Imanaga Environmental Planning Office
Sense / Kazutoshi Imanaga Courtesy of Imanaga Environmental Planning Office
Sense / Kazutoshi Imanaga Courtesy of Imanaga Environmental Planning Office
Sense / Kazutoshi Imanaga Courtesy of Imanaga Environmental Planning Office
Sense / Kazutoshi Imanaga Courtesy of Imanaga Environmental Planning Office
Sense / Kazutoshi Imanaga Courtesy of Imanaga Environmental Planning Office
Sense / Kazutoshi Imanaga Courtesy of Imanaga Environmental Planning Office
Sense / Kazutoshi Imanaga Courtesy of Imanaga Environmental Planning Office
Sense / Kazutoshi Imanaga Courtesy of Imanaga Environmental Planning Office
Sense / Kazutoshi Imanaga Courtesy of Imanaga Environmental Planning Office
Sense / Kazutoshi Imanaga Courtesy of Imanaga Environmental Planning Office
Sense / Kazutoshi Imanaga Courtesy of Imanaga Environmental Planning Office
Sense / Kazutoshi Imanaga Courtesy of Imanaga Environmental Planning Office
Sense / Kazutoshi Imanaga First & Second Floor Plan 01
Sense / Kazutoshi Imanaga Section 01
Sense / Kazutoshi Imanaga Section 02

Sense / Kazutoshi Imanaga originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 11 Oct 2012.

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Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves

Architects: Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves
Location: Parafita, Montalegre, Portugal
Architects: Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves
Project Year: 2012
Photographs: Nuno Flores

Project Area: 100 sqm
Client: Custódio Pinto Montes e Ana Moura Alves
Landscape Architecture: Daniel Monteiro

Along a slope, four water mills were the only buildings which originally existed.

In order not to interfere with these buildings, it was decided to design a higher route, taking advantage of an old path originally used by animals, connecting the north and south points on which four new wooden buildings were built in an attempt increase local tourism.

Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves © Nuno Flores
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves © Nuno Flores
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves © Nuno Flores
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves © Nuno Flores
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves © Nuno Flores
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves © Nuno Flores
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves © Nuno Flores
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves © Nuno Flores
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves © Nuno Flores
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves © Nuno Flores
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves © Nuno Flores
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves © Nuno Flores
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves © Nuno Flores
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves © Nuno Flores
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves © Nuno Flores
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves © Nuno Flores
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves © Nuno Flores
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves © Nuno Flores
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves © Nuno Flores
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves © Nuno Flores
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves © Nuno Flores
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves © Nuno Flores
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves © Nuno Flores
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves © Nuno Flores
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves © Nuno Flores
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves © Nuno Flores
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves © Nuno Flores
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves © Nuno Flores
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves Elevation 01
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves Elevation 02
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves Elevation 03
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves Elevation 04
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves Elevation 05
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves Elevation 06
Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves General Plan 01

Rural Tourism in Montalegre / Nuno Flores + Sofia Neves originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 11 Oct 2012.

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M House / Ong&Ong Architects

Architects: Ong&Ong Architects
Location: Bukit Timah, Singapore
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Derek Swalwell

Project Area: 738 sqm
Structural & Civil: KKC Consultancy Services
Mechanical & Electrical: Gims & Associates Pte Ltd
Main Contractor: Jiang Construction Pte Ltd
Project Management: Project Innovations Pte Ltd (QC)

This haven, nestled in the lush greenery of Bukit Timah Road, captures the ingenious display of mankind’s modern existence with the natural environment in perfect harmony. In keeping with the client’s request, the home provides the ideal balance between the needs for family bonding as well as for personal space.

The house’s design takes full advantage of the native tropical environment, and the building’s shape as well as its placement were carefully planned so as not to dwarf the site’s rich, natural space. Basic elemental forms were used – namely, a cube and rectangle block comprise the stacked volumes of this house – and with no shortage of sunlight in the Singapore climate, the structure’s open layout is ideal for natural lighting and cross-ventilation.

Sunlight enters from all sides of the house, providing illumination during the day whilst also keeping the interiors warm during cooler weather. To battle the heat, one can have a dip in the edgeless pool encircling the home, while natural wind also circulates within the building to bring down the temperature. The second level is also cantilevered, providing shade to areas on the ground floor.

Within the house, communal areas are spacious, with a double-volume void over the living area seamlessly unifying the two levels as a collective whole. This facilitates interaction between the close-knit family as communication across the house can be direct and intimate.

Even though space is abundant in this house, it is still able to accommodate numerous bedrooms for the many family members, with four on the second floor as well as a guestroom and maid’s quarters on the ground floor. Lourves lining the sides of the upper floor provide the choice of either opening up the floor to take in the surrounding views, or keeping the bedrooms hidden for privacy.

The selection of materials used in various sections of the house was cost-effective, with an emphasis on high-grade quality without being excessively extravagant. A Classic Modernist style was adopted through the use of fare-faced concrete and timber planks for the walls as well as teak for some of the flooring and underside of the roof. The designers also attempted to revive the terrazzo tradition, once popular in the region, by applying the composite of white cement on polished marble chips to areas such as the living room, giving its floor a seamlessly sophisticated finish. In the bathrooms, Ardex was employed in creating a raw-looking finish for the walls, which provide an interesting and striking contrast against a single feature wall that is encased in dark marble.

The concrete that covers the façade is also unique, looking very much like liquid stone and adding a raw quality that is very fitting for this nature-inspired home. Interestingly, this effect, coupled with the cantilevered second level and opened up first floor, gives the Zen-like imagery of a floating stone when the house is viewed from afar.

M House / Ong&Ong Architects © Derek Swalwell
M House / Ong&Ong Architects © Derek Swalwell
M House / Ong&Ong Architects © Derek Swalwell
M House / Ong&Ong Architects © Derek Swalwell
M House / Ong&Ong Architects © Derek Swalwell
M House / Ong&Ong Architects © Derek Swalwell
M House / Ong&Ong Architects © Derek Swalwell
M House / Ong&Ong Architects © Derek Swalwell
M House / Ong&Ong Architects © Derek Swalwell
M House / Ong&Ong Architects © Derek Swalwell
M House / Ong&Ong Architects © Derek Swalwell
M House / Ong&Ong Architects © Derek Swalwell
M House / Ong&Ong Architects © Derek Swalwell
M House / Ong&Ong Architects © Derek Swalwell
M House / Ong&Ong Architects © Derek Swalwell
M House / Ong&Ong Architects © Derek Swalwell
M House / Ong&Ong Architects © Derek Swalwell
M House / Ong&Ong Architects © Derek Swalwell
M House / Ong&Ong Architects © Derek Swalwell
M House / Ong&Ong Architects © Derek Swalwell
M House / Ong&Ong Architects © Derek Swalwell
M House / Ong&Ong Architects First Floor Plan 01
M House / Ong&Ong Architects Second Floor Plan 01
M House / Ong&Ong Architects Roof Floor Plan 01
M House / Ong&Ong Architects Site Plan 01
M House / Ong&Ong Architects Elevation 01
M House / Ong&Ong Architects Elevation 02
M House / Ong&Ong Architects Elevation 03
M House / Ong&Ong Architects Elevation 04
M House / Ong&Ong Architects Section 01

M House / Ong&Ong Architects originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 11 Oct 2012.

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MOC House / Elías Rizo Arquitectos

Architects: Elías Rizo Arquitectos
Location: Zapopan, Jalisco, México
Architects: Elías Rizo Suárez, Alejandro Rizo Suárez
Photographs: Mito Covarrubias

Project Area: 531 sqm
Collaborators: Pablo Alexanderson, Rossana Valdivia, Jorge Verdín, Carlos Miramontes, Alma Osnaya, Jenny Camarena, Roberto Contreras, Jenny Mora, Paola Hernández

Situated in one of the privileged areas of the city, this house aims to function not only as a shelter for its users, a young family with a clear and contemporary perspective, but also as a reflection of themselves.

This assignment had a very precise program and no restraints for creativity. The project takes the advantage beautiful views to the city and neighboring forests. The goal is to establish a direct dialog between the house and its surroundings.

The house is divided in two volumes. The first volume made of exposed concrete. It contains the entrance hall, staircase and living room at ground floor. The second floor houses the master bathroom and a family room. The third floor houses the play room and an open terrace. The second volume -as a counterpoint of the first one- contains the rest of the program; dining room, kitchen, bedrooms, and the special services.

The project is a clear proposition where the client and its site are the main allies. The special attention on the construction finishings was essential. It is a house that opens up to the exterior, facing the city.

MOC House / Elías Rizo Arquitectos © Mito Covarrubias
MOC House / Elías Rizo Arquitectos © Mito Covarrubias
MOC House / Elías Rizo Arquitectos © Mito Covarrubias
MOC House / Elías Rizo Arquitectos © Mito Covarrubias
MOC House / Elías Rizo Arquitectos © Mito Covarrubias
MOC House / Elías Rizo Arquitectos © Mito Covarrubias
MOC House / Elías Rizo Arquitectos © Mito Covarrubias
MOC House / Elías Rizo Arquitectos © Mito Covarrubias
MOC House / Elías Rizo Arquitectos © Mito Covarrubias
MOC House / Elías Rizo Arquitectos © Mito Covarrubias
MOC House / Elías Rizo Arquitectos © Mito Covarrubias
MOC House / Elías Rizo Arquitectos © Mito Covarrubias
MOC House / Elías Rizo Arquitectos © Mito Covarrubias
MOC House / Elías Rizo Arquitectos © Mito Covarrubias
MOC House / Elías Rizo Arquitectos © Mito Covarrubias
MOC House / Elías Rizo Arquitectos © Mito Covarrubias
MOC House / Elías Rizo Arquitectos © Mito Covarrubias
MOC House / Elías Rizo Arquitectos © Mito Covarrubias
MOC House / Elías Rizo Arquitectos Plan 01
MOC House / Elías Rizo Arquitectos Plan 02
MOC House / Elías Rizo Arquitectos Elevation 01
MOC House / Elías Rizo Arquitectos Elevation 02

MOC House / Elías Rizo Arquitectos originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 11 Oct 2012.

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Chelsea Hill House / Kariouk Associates

Architects: Kariouk Associates
Location: Chelsea, Québec, Canada
Architectural Team: Paul Kariouk, Chris Davis, Susan Gardiner, Cedric Boulet
Photographs: Courtesy of Photolux Studios

General Contractor: Sabean Custom Building
Structural Engineering: The Paterson Group

The logistical challenge was to create within a small home a segregation of spaces for the very different habits (privacy, acoustical, tidiness, etc.) of teenagers and adults while avoiding choppy spaces.

The house is conceived as a very simple masonry volume: “the foundation of the family” which overlooks a beautiful river valley. The spaces most used by the teenagers, their bedrooms, a TV area, and sports equipment storage, are all placed on the ground level. Durable surfaces such as a radiant concrete floor are used throughout this level. The formal areas of the house, the living area, dining area, kitchen, but also the master bedroom and bathroom, are all located upstairs and, as such, are given the most privileged views. Here, as well as on the stairway that leads to the main living level, more rich materials such as wood floors and glass railings are introduced with higher ceilings.

While all of the noisy and messy areas fall out of view by being placed directly beneath the living areas, the two levels are joined by the double-height entryway and hallway below. In this way, the primary living level is perceived to float lightly above the serene vista beyond. Though the home is constructed of fundamentally simple, industrial materials, one significant “cushy” indulgence was included: a bathtub suspended in the double-height space that looks over the valley. This tub, sunken in the floor, is accessed from the master bedroom and, if needed, is closed off from the adjacent living area by a sliding frosted-glass screen.

The lightness of the interior living area is contrasted by the solidity of the exterior. In response to the project’s very modest budget, industrial concrete blocks were used as the exterior veneer, but in an unconventional manner: the rough material is arranged in a pinwheelpattern yielding a playful façade throwing deep shadows. Last, because the house is quite small for a large family, an exterior, screened-in living/dining area was designed for the flat roof. When completed, this space will be accessed by an exterior steel stair, linking the interior living area and exterior living area.

Chelsea Hill House / Kariouk Associates Courtesy of Photolux Studios
Chelsea Hill House / Kariouk Associates Courtesy of Photolux Studios
Chelsea Hill House / Kariouk Associates Courtesy of Photolux Studios
Chelsea Hill House / Kariouk Associates Courtesy of Photolux Studios
Chelsea Hill House / Kariouk Associates Courtesy of Photolux Studios
Chelsea Hill House / Kariouk Associates Courtesy of Photolux Studios
Chelsea Hill House / Kariouk Associates Courtesy of Photolux Studios
Chelsea Hill House / Kariouk Associates Courtesy of Photolux Studios
Chelsea Hill House / Kariouk Associates Courtesy of Photolux Studios
Chelsea Hill House / Kariouk Associates Courtesy of Photolux Studios
Chelsea Hill House / Kariouk Associates Courtesy of Photolux Studios
Chelsea Hill House / Kariouk Associates Courtesy of Photolux Studios
Chelsea Hill House / Kariouk Associates Courtesy of Photolux Studios
Chelsea Hill House / Kariouk Associates Plan 01
Chelsea Hill House / Kariouk Associates Plan 02
Chelsea Hill House / Kariouk Associates Plan 03

Chelsea Hill House / Kariouk Associates originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 11 Oct 2012.

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El Greco Museum / Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos

Architects: Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos
Location: Toledo, Spain
Design Team: Fernando Pardo Calvo, Bernardo García Tapia
Project Year: 2010
Photographs: Courtesy of Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos

Project Area: 1461,75 sqm
Rigger: Pedro Montes
Collaborators: Ricardo Messena Gago, Stefano Presi, Stefania Albiero, David Marsinyach, Elena Castillo
Client: Gerencia de Infraestructuras y Equipamientos de Cultura, Ministerio de Cultura

Short historic notice
On the remains base of a XVI century house and a renaissance palace at the Jewry of Toledo, it was built on the beginning of XX century the edification conjunct that today compounds the El Greco Museum House.

The Marquis de la Vega-Inclán was who recovered  those areas, as well, the gardens during the years 1907 – 1910, the aim was to develop the idea of organize a center dedicated to the art work of El Greco performed at the Jewry of Toledo,  in the real El Greco ´s house environment , nearby of Villena’s Palace.

When the works were finished the Spanish State donation was formalized, and on April, 27th, 1910, the Patronage was founded, this institution took over of the custody and govern of the Greco´s Museum House. That age significant personages were involved in the Patronage. (Beruete, Sorolla, Mélida, Cossío, etc.). The House was opened and inaugurated on June, 12nd, of 1911. A section was restored as the Marquis Vega-Incan’s house, staying this private situation up to 1942.

The reasons for restore this conjunct were to shelter in it, the El Greco ´s work collection that was spread out all over the city of Toledo (San Jose´s Church, Santiago ´s Hospital, etc…) and was on risk of disappearing and lost. This collection was developed with a further room’s extension at 1921, for the exposure of the painting art work of the XVII century Spanish schools. This should be the starting point of a Spanish Art Center.

The 1921 restoration was followed by any other two, at 1950 and 1960 and other one at 1990. The current Project begins on the base site of the last one (1990)

Project
The target of the Project has been to take advantage of space and cultural potential that the edifications, gardens and the El Greco personality as well, going through a realignment labor. Meanwhile a pavilion construction gives shelter to the museum funds and a new travel path is restructured across the conjunct of buildings (rehabilitated and adapted to the current normative standards) and also allows the visit to the gardens and caves.

Museography
The museography project, although formally distinguished, takes part of the propound common objective, going through the existing building path, showing the recuperation and construction of the El Greco figure by the Marquis de la Vega-Inclán, the work and the different aspects of his life and travels, and his painting later influences, with the aim of explaining and giving value itself trough a reference configuration frame.

El Greco Museum / Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos Courtesy of Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos
El Greco Museum / Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos Courtesy of Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos
El Greco Museum / Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos Courtesy of Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos
El Greco Museum / Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos Courtesy of Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos
El Greco Museum / Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos Courtesy of Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos
El Greco Museum / Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos Courtesy of Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos
El Greco Museum / Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos Courtesy of Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos
El Greco Museum / Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos Courtesy of Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos
El Greco Museum / Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos Courtesy of Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos
El Greco Museum / Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos Courtesy of Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos
El Greco Museum / Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos Courtesy of Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos
El Greco Museum / Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos Courtesy of Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos
El Greco Museum / Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos Floor Plan 01
El Greco Museum / Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos Floor Plan 02
El Greco Museum / Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos Floor Plan 03
El Greco Museum / Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos Situation Plan 01
El Greco Museum / Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos Situation Plan 02
El Greco Museum / Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos Elevation 01
El Greco Museum / Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos Section 01
El Greco Museum / Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos Section 02

El Greco Museum / Pardo + Tapia Arquitectos originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 11 Oct 2012.

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