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Gershenson House / Roman Gonzalez Jaramillo

Architects: Roman Gonzalez Jaramillo
Location: Cholul, Yucatan, Mexico
Project Year: 2012
Photographs: Pepe Molina

Project Area: 270 sqm
Lighting Design: Marielisa Gutierrez
Drafting: Maria Lucia Reyes

The Gershenson House, with 270 m2 area of construction, is located on a 2,000 m2 parcel of land in Cholul, Yucatan, Mexico, a small community near Merida, Yucatan, Mexico.

The house is for a retired couple who search for a private space without losing contact with the nature.

The forms are mainly composed of three volumes, each allocating a specific part of the program: service, social and private functions of the house and are connected with a single transversal circulation.

One of the design premises was to reutilize the materials and expose their natural form. Every rock extracted from the excavations was used in walls and details. The house is placed on top of a 60 cm high apparent concrete footing, in which functions as a starting point for the modular rhythm.

The perimeter walls of the residence do not reach the slabs in order to keep visual contact with Nature, even within the private spaces of the house.

Integration of the exterior and interior is sought through curtain walls, a pond and gardens that divide the house in order to eliminate the monotony of the inhabitants’ day to day.

Gershenson House / Roman Gonzalez Jaramillo © Pepe Molina
Gershenson House / Roman Gonzalez Jaramillo © Pepe Molina
Gershenson House / Roman Gonzalez Jaramillo © Pepe Molina
Gershenson House / Roman Gonzalez Jaramillo © Pepe Molina
Gershenson House / Roman Gonzalez Jaramillo © Pepe Molina
Gershenson House / Roman Gonzalez Jaramillo © Pepe Molina
Gershenson House / Roman Gonzalez Jaramillo © Pepe Molina
Gershenson House / Roman Gonzalez Jaramillo © Pepe Molina
Gershenson House / Roman Gonzalez Jaramillo © Pepe Molina
Gershenson House / Roman Gonzalez Jaramillo © Pepe Molina
Gershenson House / Roman Gonzalez Jaramillo © Pepe Molina
Gershenson House / Roman Gonzalez Jaramillo © Pepe Molina
Gershenson House / Roman Gonzalez Jaramillo © Pepe Molina
Gershenson House / Roman Gonzalez Jaramillo © Pepe Molina
Gershenson House / Roman Gonzalez Jaramillo © Pepe Molina
Gershenson House / Roman Gonzalez Jaramillo Plan 01
Gershenson House / Roman Gonzalez Jaramillo Elevation 01

Gershenson House / Roman Gonzalez Jaramillo originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 11 Oct 2012.

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The Cube / Sharon Neuman Architects

Architects: Sharon Neuman Architects
Location: Lehavot Haviva, Israel
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Amit Gosher

Project Area: 430.0 sqm
Site Area: 190 sqm

The cube, brick house was planned for a family of 2 – father & son. a large open space on the ground floor contains the entrance, kitchen, dining and living rooms. Double height space above the dining table allow the stairs to go around it.

A separate area contains the study and bathroom. the master bedroom upstairs has an open plan with free standing colorful walls which define the bed,  bath and closet space.

A detached pergola keeps the cube untouched. the garden is designed for water saving.

The Cube / Sharon Neuman Architects © Amit Gosher
The Cube / Sharon Neuman Architects © Amit Gosher
The Cube / Sharon Neuman Architects © Amit Gosher
The Cube / Sharon Neuman Architects © Amit Gosher
The Cube / Sharon Neuman Architects © Amit Gosher
The Cube / Sharon Neuman Architects © Amit Gosher
The Cube / Sharon Neuman Architects © Amit Gosher
The Cube / Sharon Neuman Architects © Amit Gosher
The Cube / Sharon Neuman Architects © Amit Gosher
The Cube / Sharon Neuman Architects © Amit Gosher
The Cube / Sharon Neuman Architects © Amit Gosher
The Cube / Sharon Neuman Architects © Amit Gosher
The Cube / Sharon Neuman Architects © Amit Gosher
The Cube / Sharon Neuman Architects © Amit Gosher
The Cube / Sharon Neuman Architects © Amit Gosher
The Cube / Sharon Neuman Architects © Amit Gosher
The Cube / Sharon Neuman Architects © Amit Gosher
The Cube / Sharon Neuman Architects © Amit Gosher
The Cube / Sharon Neuman Architects © Amit Gosher
The Cube / Sharon Neuman Architects © Amit Gosher
The Cube / Sharon Neuman Architects © Amit Gosher
The Cube / Sharon Neuman Architects Plans 01
The Cube / Sharon Neuman Architects Section 01

The Cube / Sharon Neuman Architects originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 11 Oct 2012.

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Cap Vermell Cultural Center in Cala Ratjada / BB Arquitectes

Architects: BB Arquitectes
Location: Capdepera (Mallorca), Spain
Design Team: Antoni Barceló Baeza, Bàrbara Balanzó Moral
Project Year: 2009
Photographs: Jaime Sicilia, Sebastià Bonet

Project Area: 3,649.88 sqm
Structures: CRACK Ingeniería Catalana SL
Installations: REOLID Consulting
Budget: € 5,067,605

Cala Ratjada is a small seaside town located in the north-east of the island of Mallorca. It was set out as a rectangular extension and contains mainly residential buildings. The new Cultural Centre is situated in the heart of this new extension in an area where century-old pine trees give special character to the land.

Both the microclimatic conditions of the zone and its Mediterranean nature inspired the proposal: a building with an irregular silhouette and a front facade whose recesses and indentations provide personality as well as a degree of shade.

Cap Vermell Cultural Center in Cala Ratjada / BBarquitectes © Jaime Sicilia, Sebastià Bonet
Cap Vermell Cultural Center in Cala Ratjada / BBarquitectes © Jaime Sicilia, Sebastià Bonet
Cap Vermell Cultural Center in Cala Ratjada / BBarquitectes © Jaime Sicilia, Sebastià Bonet
Cap Vermell Cultural Center in Cala Ratjada / BBarquitectes © Jaime Sicilia, Sebastià Bonet
Cap Vermell Cultural Center in Cala Ratjada / BBarquitectes © Jaime Sicilia, Sebastià Bonet
Cap Vermell Cultural Center in Cala Ratjada / BBarquitectes © Jaime Sicilia, Sebastià Bonet
Cap Vermell Cultural Center in Cala Ratjada / BBarquitectes © Jaime Sicilia, Sebastià Bonet
Cap Vermell Cultural Center in Cala Ratjada / BBarquitectes © Jaime Sicilia, Sebastià Bonet
Cap Vermell Cultural Center in Cala Ratjada / BBarquitectes © Jaime Sicilia, Sebastià Bonet
Cap Vermell Cultural Center in Cala Ratjada / BBarquitectes © Jaime Sicilia, Sebastià Bonet
Cap Vermell Cultural Center in Cala Ratjada / BBarquitectes © Jaime Sicilia, Sebastià Bonet
Cap Vermell Cultural Center in Cala Ratjada / BBarquitectes © Jaime Sicilia, Sebastià Bonet
Cap Vermell Cultural Center in Cala Ratjada / BBarquitectes © Jaime Sicilia, Sebastià Bonet
Cap Vermell Cultural Center in Cala Ratjada / BBarquitectes © Jaime Sicilia, Sebastià Bonet
Cap Vermell Cultural Center in Cala Ratjada / BBarquitectes Ground Floor Plan 01
Cap Vermell Cultural Center in Cala Ratjada / BBarquitectes Plan 01 01
Cap Vermell Cultural Center in Cala Ratjada / BBarquitectes Plan 02 01
Cap Vermell Cultural Center in Cala Ratjada / BBarquitectes Plan 03 01
Cap Vermell Cultural Center in Cala Ratjada / BBarquitectes Plan 01
Cap Vermell Cultural Center in Cala Ratjada / BBarquitectes Elevation 01
Cap Vermell Cultural Center in Cala Ratjada / BBarquitectes North Elevation 01
Cap Vermell Cultural Center in Cala Ratjada / BBarquitectes Section 01
Cap Vermell Cultural Center in Cala Ratjada / BBarquitectes Cross Section 01
Cap Vermell Cultural Center in Cala Ratjada / BBarquitectes Detail 01
Cap Vermell Cultural Center in Cala Ratjada / BBarquitectes Detail 02

Cap Vermell Cultural Center in Cala Ratjada / BB Arquitectes originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 11 Oct 2012.

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House in Bioclimatic Experimental Urbanization / José Luis Rodríguez Gil

Architects: José Luis Rodríguez Gil
Location: Granadilla, Canary Islands, Spain
Project Year: 2010
Photographs: Courtesy of Estudio José Luis Rodríguez

Project Area: 120 sqm
Collaborators: Rosenda V. Marrero Hernández, María Delgado
Budget: € 108,182.18

It is pretended to build a self-sufficient house integrated into the landscape of the island  characterized by a continuous terracing of its abrupt topography. This is the germ of project: a basalt stone wall on which a light structure of plywood with galvanized steel walls and glass supports advancing southwards.

Is generated as well  an area connected to the outside (the day area )  relationship space that dominates the landscape and is protected from sun and wind. After the wall is located the sleeping area to the north  formed of small intimate venues to which is provided with high thermal inertia.

This duality is expressed in conceptual  spatial  material and construction: dematerialization and the absence of limits of the living area (space relationship between users and between them and the landscape)  against the austere interior containment for shady sleeping area (areas of privacy).

The house  designed in 1995  also aims to reduce its ecological footprint on the use of materials and construction systems  so using local materials (basalt wall insulation  covered with volcanic lapilli  etc..)  certified industrial materials environmentally (specifically the wood) and no harmful elements (PVC  VOC compounds  synthetic paints and varnishes  etc).

The inclination of the structure of the day area is determined by the solar radiation  and it integrates the panels to produce electricity and hot water  seeking a result of ZERO CO2 EMISSIONS .

House in Bioclimatic Experimental Urbanization / José Luis Rodríguez Gil Courtesy of Estudio José Luis Rodríguez
House in Bioclimatic Experimental Urbanization / José Luis Rodríguez Gil Courtesy of Estudio José Luis Rodríguez
House in Bioclimatic Experimental Urbanization / José Luis Rodríguez Gil Courtesy of Estudio José Luis Rodríguez
House in Bioclimatic Experimental Urbanization / José Luis Rodríguez Gil Courtesy of Estudio José Luis Rodríguez
House in Bioclimatic Experimental Urbanization / José Luis Rodríguez Gil Courtesy of Estudio José Luis Rodríguez
House in Bioclimatic Experimental Urbanization / José Luis Rodríguez Gil Courtesy of Estudio José Luis Rodríguez
House in Bioclimatic Experimental Urbanization / José Luis Rodríguez Gil Courtesy of Estudio José Luis Rodríguez
House in Bioclimatic Experimental Urbanization / José Luis Rodríguez Gil Courtesy of Estudio José Luis Rodríguez
House in Bioclimatic Experimental Urbanization / José Luis Rodríguez Gil Plan 01
House in Bioclimatic Experimental Urbanization / José Luis Rodríguez Gil Section 01
House in Bioclimatic Experimental Urbanization / José Luis Rodríguez Gil Detail 01
House in Bioclimatic Experimental Urbanization / José Luis Rodríguez Gil Detail 02
House in Bioclimatic Experimental Urbanization / José Luis Rodríguez Gil Detail 03
House in Bioclimatic Experimental Urbanization / José Luis Rodríguez Gil Detail 04

House in Bioclimatic Experimental Urbanization / José Luis Rodríguez Gil originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 10 Oct 2012.

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Ingelheim Funeral Chapel / Bayer & Strobel Architekten

Architects: Bayer & Strobel Architekten
Location: Ingelheim am Rhein, Germany
Design Team: Gunther Bayer, Peter Strobel
Project Year: 2012
Photographs: Courtesy of Bayer & Strobel Architekten

Client: Stadt Ingelheim am Rhein

As an essential element of the redesign of the cemetery, massive quarry-stone walls were built, made of the typical local yellow-grey stone. they block off the cemetery from the street, enclosing it as a place of peace and contemplation while also acting as retaining walls separating the entrance area from the more elevated parts of the cemetery used for burials. As the heart of the cemetery, the funeral chapel is made into a natural part of the entrance area through the use of quarry stone for its facade as well as in the interior.

The result is a sophisticated series of interior and exterior spaces with finely modulated transitions. cemetery and funeral chapel are perceived as a harmonious unit and become an inseparable whole. the funeral hall itself exudes a bright and friendly atmosphere. To do justice to its significance within the cemetery complex, it is clearly marked with a gable roof. This creates an interior that feels dignified and solemn as well as simple and appropriate to its purpose.

Ingelheim Funeral Chapel / Bayer & Strobel Architekten Courtesy of Bayer & Strobel Architekten
Ingelheim Funeral Chapel / Bayer & Strobel Architekten Courtesy of Bayer & Strobel Architekten
Ingelheim Funeral Chapel / Bayer & Strobel Architekten Courtesy of Bayer & Strobel Architekten
Ingelheim Funeral Chapel / Bayer & Strobel Architekten Courtesy of Bayer & Strobel Architekten
Ingelheim Funeral Chapel / Bayer & Strobel Architekten Courtesy of Bayer & Strobel Architekten
Ingelheim Funeral Chapel / Bayer & Strobel Architekten Courtesy of Bayer & Strobel Architekten
Ingelheim Funeral Chapel / Bayer & Strobel Architekten Courtesy of Bayer & Strobel Architekten
Ingelheim Funeral Chapel / Bayer & Strobel Architekten Courtesy of Bayer & Strobel Architekten
Ingelheim Funeral Chapel / Bayer & Strobel Architekten Courtesy of Bayer & Strobel Architekten
Ingelheim Funeral Chapel / Bayer & Strobel Architekten Courtesy of Bayer & Strobel Architekten
Ingelheim Funeral Chapel / Bayer & Strobel Architekten Courtesy of Bayer & Strobel Architekten
Ingelheim Funeral Chapel / Bayer & Strobel Architekten Courtesy of Bayer & Strobel Architekten
Ingelheim Funeral Chapel / Bayer & Strobel Architekten Courtesy of Bayer & Strobel Architekten
Ingelheim Funeral Chapel / Bayer & Strobel Architekten Courtesy of Bayer & Strobel Architekten
Ingelheim Funeral Chapel / Bayer & Strobel Architekten Courtesy of Bayer & Strobel Architekten
Ingelheim Funeral Chapel / Bayer & Strobel Architekten Plan 01
Ingelheim Funeral Chapel / Bayer & Strobel Architekten North Elevation 01
Ingelheim Funeral Chapel / Bayer & Strobel Architekten South Elevation 01
Ingelheim Funeral Chapel / Bayer & Strobel Architekten East Elevation 01
Ingelheim Funeral Chapel / Bayer & Strobel Architekten West Elevation 01
Ingelheim Funeral Chapel / Bayer & Strobel Architekten Section 01
Ingelheim Funeral Chapel / Bayer & Strobel Architekten Section 02
Ingelheim Funeral Chapel / Bayer & Strobel Architekten Section 03

Ingelheim Funeral Chapel / Bayer & Strobel Architekten originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 10 Oct 2012.

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St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I

Architects: Buro II & Archi+I
Location: Sint-Agatha-Berchem, Belgium
Project Year: 2012
Project Area: 3,374 sqm
Photographs: Filip Dujardin

Context

These new social housing units are in addition to the social housing district built in 1922-1925 by architect Victor Bourgeois. One plot is located along the Beheersstraat and has 43 units, the other one is along the Dendermondestraat with 32 units. On both plots, four blocks of apartments and low-energy houses have been built, classically aligned or in a sawtooth configuration.

Low wall and hedges define the immediate environment and the boundaries between the residences and the common area. The layout of the common are is to a high standard, in line with shat L. Van del Swaelm has achieved in the Cité Moderne. The courtyard, with its benches and greenery, invites meeting.

Architecture

The volumetrics and maximum building heights echo the buildings created by Victor Bourgeois in his Cité Moderne and the expression given there to the canopies, balconies, patios, awnings… The contemporary translation of these modernistic elements ensures sufficient variety in typology for the eight different blocks. As a mark of honour for the revolutionary use of concrete by Victor Bourgeois, the façades have been provided with an outer covering in precast concrete. Its combination with wood offers a warm contrast. The choice of flat roofs completes the cubist context of the Cité Moderne.

Engineering

This sustainable district guarantees a balance between economic, technical and social criteria and offers both a high architectural quality and excellent energy performance through the use of solar panels, rainwater recovery, environmentally friendly material, and optimised insulation and ventilation. The apartments and the houses have a K-value of 30. The low-energy housing units and the E level is 60 for the apartments and 50 or less for the houses.

St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I © Filip Dujardin
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I © Filip Dujardin
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I © Filip Dujardin
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I © Filip Dujardin
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I © Filip Dujardin
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I © Filip Dujardin
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I © Filip Dujardin
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I © Filip Dujardin
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I © Filip Dujardin
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I © Filip Dujardin
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I © Filip Dujardin
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I © Filip Dujardin
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I © Filip Dujardin
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I © Filip Dujardin
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I © Filip Dujardin
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I © Filip Dujardin
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I © Filip Dujardin
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I © Filip Dujardin
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I © Filip Dujardin
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I Plan 01
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I Plan 02
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I Plan 03
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I Plan 04
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I Plan 05
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I Plan 06
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I Plan 07
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I Plan 08
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I Plan 09
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I North Elevation 01
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I South Elevation 01
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I East Elevation 01
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I West Elevation 01
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I North East Elevation 01
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I North West Elevation 01
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I South East Elevation 01
St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I South West Elevation 01

St-Agatha-Berchem Sustainable Social Housing / Buro II & Archi+I originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 10 Oct 2012.

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Youth Centre in Roskilde / Cornelius + Vöge

Architects: Cornelius + Vöge
Location: Roskilde County, Denmark
Project Year: 2012
Photographs: Adam Mørk

Project Area: 600 sqm
Client: Roskilde Municipality

The project is a conversion and extension of an existing building. The main approach is to make a new interpretation of the red barn buildings and fishermen cabins of the old part of the village where the building is located. The extension to the old building starts where the building takes a turn making a more intimate feeling surrounding the outdoor play areas.

The building is located between an old village and a seventies development, so in order to underline a regional identity to the building it was coloured all red. The red colour follows the tradition of the old fishermen cabins of the village, which are one of the most characteristic elements of the village. The roof has the same colour as the facades to make the shape of the building more precise and simple underlining the basic shape of the building.

The building is renovated into a low energy building, covered with new facade materials and reorganized into a more open, playful and modern building.  New covered areas, balconies and stairs integrates more intimate corners and living areas both outside and inside. The surrounding green areas are more integrated and daylight optimised. The extension includes a flexible multi purpose hall for concerts, theatre, playing and sports activities including an integrated climbing wall.

Several façade elements breaks the basic shape of the building into a smaller scale: a stair functions as a small stage area, covered entrances and the corner window which cantilevers from the building and creates a more intimate living space for the children to sit in smaller groups – a private space being a part of the interior and exterior at the same time.

Youth Centre in Roskilde / Cornelius + Vöge © Adam Mørk
Youth Centre in Roskilde / Cornelius + Vöge © Adam Mørk
Youth Centre in Roskilde / Cornelius + Vöge © Adam Mørk
Youth Centre in Roskilde / Cornelius + Vöge © Adam Mørk
Youth Centre in Roskilde / Cornelius + Vöge © Adam Mørk
Youth Centre in Roskilde / Cornelius + Vöge © Adam Mørk
Youth Centre in Roskilde / Cornelius + Vöge © Adam Mørk
Youth Centre in Roskilde / Cornelius + Vöge Plan 01
Youth Centre in Roskilde / Cornelius + Vöge Plan 02
Youth Centre in Roskilde / Cornelius + Vöge Elevation 01
Youth Centre in Roskilde / Cornelius + Vöge Section 01
Youth Centre in Roskilde / Cornelius + Vöge Section 02
Youth Centre in Roskilde / Cornelius + Vöge Diagram 01

Youth Centre in Roskilde / Cornelius + Vöge originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 10 Oct 2012.

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Haus BRU 1.25 / SoHo Architektur

Architects: SoHo Architektur
Location: Heimertingen, Bavaria, Germany
Architect In Charge: Alexander Nägele
Project Year: 2008
Project Area: 90 sqm
Photographs: Courtesy of SoHo Architektur

The 125,000 Euro detached home with 90 sqm habitable area was developed for a couple – precisely the architect’s brother – BRU 1.25.

Decisions on construction method, materiality and quality were primarily based on building costs. Fair faced interior walls, screed as finished flooring, visible insulation strips between floor and walls, and the use of corrugated cement fibre panels for facade cladding and roofing – no need for rainpipes and gutters – help to reduce the costs. The timber building enables a strong connection between interior and exterior through the accurately positioned openings on ground level. The double floor height dining area generously connects first and second floor. The wooden deck between the house and the garage offers a private outdoor room, bordered by a concrete wall to the north and a flower bed to the south.

The small dwelling reveals an economic alternative to the commonly used concepts, although, according to the local newspapers, due to the originality of the design it asks for some openess from its neighbours and vicinity.

Haus BRU 1.25 / SoHo Architektur Courtesy of SoHo Architektur
Haus BRU 1.25 / SoHo Architektur Courtesy of SoHo Architektur
Haus BRU 1.25 / SoHo Architektur Courtesy of SoHo Architektur
Haus BRU 1.25 / SoHo Architektur Courtesy of SoHo Architektur
Haus BRU 1.25 / SoHo Architektur Courtesy of SoHo Architektur
Haus BRU 1.25 / SoHo Architektur Courtesy of SoHo Architektur
Haus BRU 1.25 / SoHo Architektur Courtesy of SoHo Architektur
Haus BRU 1.25 / SoHo Architektur Courtesy of SoHo Architektur
Haus BRU 1.25 / SoHo Architektur Ground Floor Plan 01
Haus BRU 1.25 / SoHo Architektur Upper Floor Plan 01
Haus BRU 1.25 / SoHo Architektur Site Plan 01
Haus BRU 1.25 / SoHo Architektur Facades 01
Haus BRU 1.25 / SoHo Architektur Facades 02
Haus BRU 1.25 / SoHo Architektur Section 01

Haus BRU 1.25 / SoHo Architektur originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 10 Oct 2012.

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Automative Industry Exporters Union Technical and Industrial High School / Metin K?l?ç + Dürrin Süer

Architects: Metin K?l?ç + Dürrin Süer
Location: Bursa, Turkey
Architectural Group: Metin K?l?ç, Dürrin Süer
Architectural Office: Seden Cinasal Avc?, Merih Feza Y?ld?r?m, Serdar Usluba?, Duygu Ceylan Sayl?m, Tu?çe ??k
Project Year: 2008
Photographs: Cemal Emden

Project Area: 32000.0 sqm
Supervisor: Deniz Güner

With its capacity of 720 students and various facilities including the dormitory, lodging places, sports hall and conference hall, the intense functional layout of the education building is designed as consisting of discrete parts with different elevations within an integrated whole. The layout of discrete blocks in the site plan is connected with a social artery to which facilities of different strata are articulated in the third dimension, i.e., via a transparent gallery and a series of successive courtyards.

Offering enriched means of social living as if resembling an urban square, this gallery is supported by the sports hall and the conference hall on the ground floor and spaces like the conference hall and the student canteen as well as workshops and classrooms on the entrance floor. The gallery acting as a social artery avails for a visual dialogue while it visually connects the gallery with outer courtyards.

When walking along the urban streets, one can possibly have connections not only with the inner gallery, but also the outer courtyard. In order to support such diverse means of communication provided within the building, effort is also spent for creation of a dynamic environment with use of vivid colours. The visual richness of the building is further reinforced with its fragmented building form as well. The existing green pattern – olive grove is purposely intertwined with the building mass in the design. While one part of the various terraces provided at different elevations are converted into open areas for students, the focus at other parts has been to ensure continuity of the green.

The idea to cover the terraces of education units with vegetation in harmony with the land slope has not only provided for continuity of the green, but also helped in placement of accommodation facilities (dormitory and lodging) separately from social and cultural facilities, at a location facing this green pattern created by the olive grove. The education building could therefore meet the idea of differentiating between the daily and private life of its users. The terraces designed to take place at different elevations of the building have been allocated to outdoor playtime area on the classrooms floor and were used as roof gardens on the resting hall floor of the dormitory. Landscape design intends to give the roof garden a rural atmosphere.

Auotmative Industry Exporters Union Technical and Industrial High School / Oficina Asma Bahçeleri Houses © Cemal Emden
Auotmative Industry Exporters Union Technical and Industrial High School / Oficina Asma Bahçeleri Houses © Cemal Emden
Auotmative Industry Exporters Union Technical and Industrial High School / Oficina Asma Bahçeleri Houses © Cemal Emden
Auotmative Industry Exporters Union Technical and Industrial High School / Oficina Asma Bahçeleri Houses © Cemal Emden
Auotmative Industry Exporters Union Technical and Industrial High School / Oficina Asma Bahçeleri Houses © Cemal Emden
Auotmative Industry Exporters Union Technical and Industrial High School / Oficina Asma Bahçeleri Houses © Cemal Emden
Auotmative Industry Exporters Union Technical and Industrial High School / Oficina Asma Bahçeleri Houses © Cemal Emden
Auotmative Industry Exporters Union Technical and Industrial High School / Oficina Asma Bahçeleri Houses © Cemal Emden
Auotmative Industry Exporters Union Technical and Industrial High School / Oficina Asma Bahçeleri Houses © Cemal Emden
Auotmative Industry Exporters Union Technical and Industrial High School / Oficina Asma Bahçeleri Houses © Cemal Emden
Auotmative Industry Exporters Union Technical and Industrial High School / Oficina Asma Bahçeleri Houses © Cemal Emden
Auotmative Industry Exporters Union Technical and Industrial High School / Oficina Asma Bahçeleri Houses © Cemal Emden
Auotmative Industry Exporters Union Technical and Industrial High School / Oficina Asma Bahçeleri Houses © Cemal Emden
Auotmative Industry Exporters Union Technical and Industrial High School / Oficina Asma Bahçeleri Houses © Cemal Emden
Auotmative Industry Exporters Union Technical and Industrial High School / Oficina Asma Bahçeleri Houses © Cemal Emden
Auotmative Industry Exporters Union Technical and Industrial High School / Oficina Asma Bahçeleri Houses 1st   3rd Floor Plan 01
Auotmative Industry Exporters Union Technical and Industrial High School / Oficina Asma Bahçeleri Houses 1st Basement Floor Plan 01
Auotmative Industry Exporters Union Technical and Industrial High School / Oficina Asma Bahçeleri Houses 2nd Basement Floor Plan 01
Auotmative Industry Exporters Union Technical and Industrial High School / Oficina Asma Bahçeleri Houses 3rd Basement Floor Plan 01
Auotmative Industry Exporters Union Technical and Industrial High School / Oficina Asma Bahçeleri Houses 4th Basement Floor Plan 01
Auotmative Industry Exporters Union Technical and Industrial High School / Oficina Asma Bahçeleri Houses Ground Floor Plan 01
Auotmative Industry Exporters Union Technical and Industrial High School / Oficina Asma Bahçeleri Houses Section 01
Auotmative Industry Exporters Union Technical and Industrial High School / Oficina Asma Bahçeleri Houses Section 02
Auotmative Industry Exporters Union Technical and Industrial High School / Oficina Asma Bahçeleri Houses Section 03
Auotmative Industry Exporters Union Technical and Industrial High School / Oficina Asma Bahçeleri Houses Section 04
Auotmative Industry Exporters Union Technical and Industrial High School / Oficina Asma Bahçeleri Houses Section 05
Auotmative Industry Exporters Union Technical and Industrial High School / Oficina Asma Bahçeleri Houses North & South Elevations 01
Auotmative Industry Exporters Union Technical and Industrial High School / Oficina Asma Bahçeleri Houses East & West Elevations 01

Automative Industry Exporters Union Technical and Industrial High School / Metin K?l?ç + Dürrin Süer originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 10 Oct 2012.

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Ingfah Restaurant / Integrated Field

Architects: Integrated Field
Location: Khaolak, Thailand
Project Year: 2011
Project Area: 2,040 sqm
Photographs: Courtesy of Integrated Field co.,ltd.

Ingfah restaurant is a local cuisine, outdoor seating restaurant located in Khaolak, Phangnga, Thailand. First time when we arrived the location, the site of this restaurant is surrounded by buildings and has no sea view. The most effective potentials left for this site was the lawn and the sky. Therefore, IF proposed the concept of dining in the new way, sitting / lying down (which adapted and redefined from the past Thai dining behavior), and “Frame” the sky view to capture and make the beauty of the sky even more meaningful. Then, we had considered about the constraint of the limited construction time and the owner’s requirement that want this project to be a new destination for people, and also, raise the standard of the restaurant level around Khoalak area, which could be like lightening this area with flying lanterns spread out in the sky at night.

The conceptual idea came to be the restaurant that contain “many of small units” which can be constructed in the shorter period than one big unit, and easier to be re-arranged in the future. Furthermore, IF had proposed the new style of dining and the food itself. We re-defined the old way of Thai people’s “sitting and lying while eating on the big stool”, and make it get along with the “set menu of street food” proposed by the owner. It is the set of variety of food that allows you to have many tastes of food in one set, yet have it in a proper quantity.

Along with the food, the triangular side pillows are provided to create the feeling of relaxation when the customers lean on it. It is clothed with the blue Tie dyed style pillow case which refer to the southern part of Thailand and the image of “cloud and the sky”.

The main structure for each unit was designed to be a “light geometric structure”, the very slim steel skeleton structure. It was meant to blend in with the sky and let only the fabric stretched on it exist to the people’s sight. This fabric would be the “frame that capture the sky” and “the lantern that light up that area”.

Material details
– The steel structure : Well polished with the best rust-protection color since the site is next to the sea.
– The fabric : Outdoor quality fabric, designed with easy installation and maintenance fitting details.
– Lighting : The adjustable LED that creates the variety of the better atmostphere for the restaurant, depends on the time of the day or the special occasion.

The word ” INGFAH” comes from 2 Thai words. First, ING (“???” in Thai) means to “lean on” something, or “lie down on” something. Second, FAH (“???” in Thai) means “sky”. Together “INGFAH” means “to see the sky, while lying down” or “Leaning on the sky”.

This name was inspired by 2 significant signatures of this restaurant combined together which are:
– The Thai traditional way of dining. (to lie down and lean on the triangular pillow while dining or resting)
– The sky view that was framed by the architecture and could be seen while dining.

Ingfah Restaurant / Integrated Field co.,ltd. Courtesy of Integrated Field co.,ltd.
Ingfah Restaurant / Integrated Field co.,ltd. Courtesy of Integrated Field co.,ltd.
Ingfah Restaurant / Integrated Field co.,ltd. Courtesy of Integrated Field co.,ltd.
Ingfah Restaurant / Integrated Field co.,ltd. Courtesy of Integrated Field co.,ltd.
Ingfah Restaurant / Integrated Field co.,ltd. Courtesy of Integrated Field co.,ltd.
Ingfah Restaurant / Integrated Field co.,ltd. Courtesy of Integrated Field co.,ltd.
Ingfah Restaurant / Integrated Field co.,ltd. Courtesy of Integrated Field co.,ltd.
Ingfah Restaurant / Integrated Field co.,ltd. Courtesy of Integrated Field co.,ltd.
Ingfah Restaurant / Integrated Field co.,ltd. Courtesy of Integrated Field co.,ltd.
Ingfah Restaurant / Integrated Field co.,ltd. Courtesy of Integrated Field co.,ltd.
Ingfah Restaurant / Integrated Field co.,ltd. Courtesy of Integrated Field co.,ltd.
Ingfah Restaurant / Integrated Field co.,ltd. Courtesy of Integrated Field co.,ltd.
Ingfah Restaurant / Integrated Field co.,ltd. Courtesy of Integrated Field co.,ltd.
Ingfah Restaurant / Integrated Field co.,ltd. Courtesy of Integrated Field co.,ltd.
Ingfah Restaurant / Integrated Field co.,ltd. Courtesy of Integrated Field co.,ltd.
Ingfah Restaurant / Integrated Field co.,ltd. Courtesy of Integrated Field co.,ltd.
Ingfah Restaurant / Integrated Field co.,ltd. Courtesy of Integrated Field co.,ltd.
Ingfah Restaurant / Integrated Field co.,ltd. Courtesy of Integrated Field co.,ltd.
Ingfah Restaurant / Integrated Field co.,ltd. Courtesy of Integrated Field co.,ltd.
Ingfah Restaurant / Integrated Field co.,ltd. Floor Plan 01
Ingfah Restaurant / Integrated Field co.,ltd. Floor Plan 02
Ingfah Restaurant / Integrated Field co.,ltd. Section 01
Ingfah Restaurant / Integrated Field co.,ltd. Section 02

Ingfah Restaurant / Integrated Field originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 10 Oct 2012.

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