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Bureau 100 / NFOE et Associés Architectes

© Stéphane Brügger

Architects: NFOE et Associés Architectes
Location: Montreal, QC H2Y 2W7, Canada
Project Manager: Masa Fukushima, Rafie Sossanpour
Project Year: 2012
Project Area: 1,015 sqm
Photographs: Stéphane Brügger

Situated in the heart of the city, Bureau 100 is surrounded by several large projects associated with Barott, including the majestic Aldred Building (designed by Barott in 1929 and regarded by many as his most accomplished work), the modernist highrise for the Bank of Montreal’s head office (designed by Barott’s firm and inaugurated in 1960), the Royal Trust Building (designed by the American firm McKin, Mead & White, with the participation of Barott, in 1912), and the National Bank of Canada Building (a 1965 project for which Barott acted as consulting architect for the firm David, Barott and Boulva of which his son, Peter T. M. Barott, was one of the founders).

© Stéphane Brügger

A successful synergistic relationship with the owner (winner of the CIGM Commercial Heritage Building Award in 2005) resulted in a large-scale restoration project on the first two floors, occupied by NFOE. The interior, which had deteriorated considerably, was returned to its original state, with impressive Corinthian columns, ornate ceiling mouldings, and original woodwork. All of this, plus the immense windows and light colours, contribute to creating a stimulating work environment.

© Stéphane Brügger

The project’s aesthetic approach links past and present in a subtle play between verticals and horizontals. Both floors have been freed of all the partitions of previous renovations. The simple, elegant furnishings act as a background for this space rich in architectural details. The workstations in the open-plan space encourage interaction among work groups, while offering the possibility for individual thought and reflection. Zones for improvised meetings are located in proximity to the workstations. The levels are composed of open spaces that emphasize the original ornamentations of the columns, ceilings, mouldings, and woodwork. The bank vault is still in place on the ground floor and is now used as a library.

© Stéphane Brügger

Each floor has its own distinct ambience: the ground floor is grandiose, whereas the upper floor is intimate. On the ceilings, the exposed infrastructure vies with the ornamentations. The ground floor has a high (17-foot) ceiling and large windows offering a stunning view of Old Montreal. It is bathed in natural light, which is diffused into the workspace by the light colour of the walls and furniture. Dark accents on the walls give depth to these well-lit spaces. The second floor has a lower ceiling, encouraging intimacy in the work areas. A series of superimposed drop ceilings amplifies the height reduction and acts as a series of horizontal slabs contrasting with the vertical columns.

© Stéphane Brügger

The different interventions are composed of pure, minimal lines. A dialogue is created among the glass, drywall, and metal – among strength, transparency, and the weight of the materials. Only in the ground-floor waiting area are there touches of colour: a green monolith and a metal strip floating on a glass panel play against the white classical columns.

© Stéphane Brügger

The original woodwork and fireplace have been preserved in the ground-floor conference room. Above the woodwork, the dark-coloured walls amplify the height under the ceiling and visually detach the ornate mouldings from the wall. The lighting fixtures, with a contemporary aesthetic, seem to fall, like water drops, from the ceiling to the floor. These original and contemporary ornamentations add cachet to this space, which opens on to Place d’Armes.

© Stéphane Brügger

The mezzanine overlooks the ground-floor workspaces. A blue wall spans both floors along the interior stairway behind the workspaces. This colour leads to the second floor and is continued in the cafeteria. To ensure the partners’ privacy and confidentiality, their offices are at one end giving onto Place d’Armes. Visual permeability is preserved with the use of glass panels as partitions and doors. The upstairs conference room, at the back of the floor, overlooks Place d’Armes with a large window with semi-circle woodwork. The lighting fixture over the conference table echoes the shape of the window.

First Floor Plan

Bureau 100 / NFOE et Associés Architectes © Stéphane Brügger
Bureau 100 / NFOE et Associés Architectes © Stéphane Brügger
Bureau 100 / NFOE et Associés Architectes © Stéphane Brügger
Bureau 100 / NFOE et Associés Architectes © Stéphane Brügger
Bureau 100 / NFOE et Associés Architectes © Stéphane Brügger
Bureau 100 / NFOE et Associés Architectes © Stéphane Brügger
Bureau 100 / NFOE et Associés Architectes © Stéphane Brügger
Bureau 100 / NFOE et Associés Architectes © Stéphane Brügger
Bureau 100 / NFOE et Associés Architectes First Floor Plan 01
Bureau 100 / NFOE et Associés Architectes Ground Floor Plan 01

Bureau 100 / NFOE et Associés Architectes originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 26 Jul 2012.

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White Cube Bermondsey / Casper Mueller Kneer Architects

© Paul Riddle

Architects: Casper Mueller Kneer Architects
Location: Bermondsey, London Borough of Southwark, London SE16, UK
Design Team: Jens Casper, Marianne Mueller, Olaf Kneer
Project Year: 2011
Project Area: 5,440 sqm
Photographs: Paul Riddle

Conversion and extension of an existing 1970 warehouse into a contemporary art gallery complex. More than 5440 m2 of existing warehouse space were transformed to provide several exhibition spaces each with their own character, a suite of private viewing rooms, a 60 seater auditorium, a bookshop, an archive and offices as well as facilities for art storage, assembly and documentation.

© Paul Riddle

Materially, the industrial character of the building was maintained and enhanced by new additions and modifications. The structure was generally retained, but opened up and substantially modified. A new entrance yard, brought a previously closed off space into the public realm and draws new audiences to the area. Internally the public spaces are arranged along a 60m long street-like long corridor.

© Paul Riddle

There are three principle exhibition areas which differ in dimensions, proportions and light condition: The ‘South Galleries’ provide 780m2 of column free space and act as the main display area. The ‘North Galleries’ are smaller, more experimental in character. ‘9x9x9’ is a centrally located cubic space of shape – the only space penetrating the existing building envelope and flooded with natural light. An auditorium allows the presentation of films and lectures.

© Paul Riddle

The new gallery spaces were inserted as free standing volumes at the heart of the building – shells within a shell – and surrounded by ancillary spaces and service voids. This allows the galleries to be serviced from all sides and be structurally and enviromentally self-contained, independent from the existing building.

© Paul Riddle

The lighting design provides a completely even light. Some galleries combine natural and artificial light. All viewing rooms and gallery ceilings allow for varying sub divisions by temporary walls.

Plan

Industrial materials were set against the white gallery interiors. These are often untreated or self-coloured. The floors are power floated natural grey concrete. Steel meshes are used for the public corridor and entrance areas. Doors are made from untreated mild steel or stainless steel and glass. Concrete, grey granite and steel dominate the external landscaping.

White Cube Bermondsey / Casper Mueller Kneer Architects © Paul Riddle
White Cube Bermondsey / Casper Mueller Kneer Architects © Paul Riddle
White Cube Bermondsey / Casper Mueller Kneer Architects © Paul Riddle
White Cube Bermondsey / Casper Mueller Kneer Architects © Paul Riddle
White Cube Bermondsey / Casper Mueller Kneer Architects © Paul Riddle
White Cube Bermondsey / Casper Mueller Kneer Architects © Paul Riddle
White Cube Bermondsey / Casper Mueller Kneer Architects © Paul Riddle
White Cube Bermondsey / Casper Mueller Kneer Architects © Paul Riddle
White Cube Bermondsey / Casper Mueller Kneer Architects © Paul Riddle
White Cube Bermondsey / Casper Mueller Kneer Architects © Paul Riddle
White Cube Bermondsey / Casper Mueller Kneer Architects Plan 01
White Cube Bermondsey / Casper Mueller Kneer Architects Plan 02
White Cube Bermondsey / Casper Mueller Kneer Architects Plan 03

White Cube Bermondsey / Casper Mueller Kneer Architects originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 23 Jul 2012.

House In Avintes / Gisela Silva Monteiro

© Marcos Oliveira

Architects: Gisela Silva Monteiro
Location: Avintes, Portugal
Collaborators: Célia Magalhães, Cláudia Aragão, Eusébio Soares, Nuno Monteiro
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Marcos Oliveira

The House located in Vila de Avintes, from the early 20th Century, was found in an advanced state of degradation, having suffered multiple changes and unplanned additions along the times, threatening to erase its original character.

© Marcos Oliveira

Presented with this challenge, the selected approach was to reconnect the old with the new, finding a conducting line between both realities. The House original project was found and presented to the new family as the baseline for the new development.

Section

The programme was defined as such: one suite, three bedrooms, toilets, living and dining room, office, laundry, garage and attic. From the garden, play areas were established, alongside a small vegetable garden and a new leisure space.

© Marcos Oliveira

The House main body was rebuilt through the usage of a rising concrete box set free in the rooftop, delivering unexpected openings to the outside. Six circular skylights were introduced creating organic light entries and mysterious moments.

© Marcos Oliveira

The connection between the outside of the House and the garden was reinstated, with the main road also rebuilt.

Plan

The outside tiles were recovered and kept, and a new outside thermal insulation was introduced under the roof, painted brown. Portuguese traditional materials, such as hydraulic mosaic, wood and plaster were extensively used.

© Marcos Oliveira

House In Avintes / Gisela Silva Monteiro © Marcos Oliveira
House In Avintes / Gisela Silva Monteiro © Marcos Oliveira
House In Avintes / Gisela Silva Monteiro © Marcos Oliveira
House In Avintes / Gisela Silva Monteiro © Marcos Oliveira
House In Avintes / Gisela Silva Monteiro © Marcos Oliveira
House In Avintes / Gisela Silva Monteiro © Marcos Oliveira
House In Avintes / Gisela Silva Monteiro © Marcos Oliveira
House In Avintes / Gisela Silva Monteiro © Marcos Oliveira
House In Avintes / Gisela Silva Monteiro © Marcos Oliveira
House In Avintes / Gisela Silva Monteiro © Marcos Oliveira
House In Avintes / Gisela Silva Monteiro Plan 01
House In Avintes / Gisela Silva Monteiro Plan 02
House In Avintes / Gisela Silva Monteiro Plan 03
House In Avintes / Gisela Silva Monteiro Plan 04
House In Avintes / Gisela Silva Monteiro Section 01

House In Avintes / Gisela Silva Monteiro originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 23 Jul 2012.

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Atlassian Offices / Studio Sarah Willmer

© Jasper Sanidad

Architects: Studio Sarah Willmer
Location: 1098 Harrison St, San Francisco, CA 94103, USA
Design Team: Sarah Willmer, Doris Guerrero, Megan Carter, Josue Munoz-Miramon, Olya Piskun
Project Year: 2012
Photographs: Jasper Sanidad

Project Area: 42,000 sq ft
Structural Engineer: Alex Rood, Fulcrum Structural Engineering

As luxury buses transport urban dwellers to Silicon Valley, Atlassian made a bold and consciousmove to stay in the city close to its workforce.The officeinterior, an unexpected oasis offset by itsenigmatic warehouse exterior, offers generous and varied open spacedesigned to mimic its city analog. While other software headquarters resemble clubhouses, tree houses, and a bevy of other office typologies, Atlassian’s clients and employees prefer a casually elegant environment. Atlassian currently services 81 of the Fortune 100 companies. Its new42,000 square foot space reflects the company’s success at promoting an innovative product.

© Jasper Sanidad

Atlassian’s culture is founded on being open and transparent with its employees, clients, and partners. In fact, the largest expense within the construction budget reflects the considerable amount of glazing utilized to achieve the balance of natural daylight and the need for an open and collaborative work environment. Multiple transparent conference rooms and various breakout areas for teamwork augment the egalitarian workspace (no dedicated or closed offices).The existing trussed double height space of the warehouseinspired the design of a “Town Square” and amphitheater: a common space for staff meetings, presentations, and product launches. Naturally becoming the focus of their new workplace, the wood terraced amphitheaterseating took on a life of its own, evolving into a sculpted wood object carved at its underbelly with frameless glass enclosing a primary conference room. Facing the amphitheater, six transparent conference rooms, one wrapped in wood, define and contain the public event space.

© Jasper Sanidad

Employee support spaces integrated throughout the office include generous kitchen and café areas, a game room, lounge areas, ample bicycle parking and showers. A refined color palette is utilized throughout with bolder splashes of color used to activate the smallest of rooms, the skype booths. A 25ft long sandwich island in the kitchen is fully stocked for daily lunch makings, engendering casual staff discourse among its 150 (and counting) employees.Atlassian has an open door policy towards employee dogs, an attitude that highlights this new approach to work and workplace.

© Jasper Sanidad

The design for Atlassian’s space contributes to a trend in office design where transparent work culture is ever present: software engineers sit next to CEOs, glass conference rooms reveal and invite collaboration and public space encourages teamwork and community building. Innovative in its software products, Atlassian inspires a congenial and accessible office where one can “raid” the fridge, bring a dog, bike to work and stay engaged in the company’s culture: an unforgettable workplace.

Section

Atlassian Offices / Studio Sarah Willmer © Jasper Sanidad
Atlassian Offices / Studio Sarah Willmer © Jasper Sanidad
Atlassian Offices / Studio Sarah Willmer © Jasper Sanidad
Atlassian Offices / Studio Sarah Willmer © Jasper Sanidad
Atlassian Offices / Studio Sarah Willmer © Jasper Sanidad
Atlassian Offices / Studio Sarah Willmer © Jasper Sanidad
Atlassian Offices / Studio Sarah Willmer © Jasper Sanidad
Atlassian Offices / Studio Sarah Willmer © Jasper Sanidad
Atlassian Offices / Studio Sarah Willmer © Jasper Sanidad
Atlassian Offices / Studio Sarah Willmer © Jasper Sanidad
Atlassian Offices / Studio Sarah Willmer © Jasper Sanidad
Atlassian Offices / Studio Sarah Willmer © Jasper Sanidad
Atlassian Offices / Studio Sarah Willmer © Jasper Sanidad
Atlassian Offices / Studio Sarah Willmer © Jasper Sanidad
Atlassian Offices / Studio Sarah Willmer © Jasper Sanidad
Atlassian Offices / Studio Sarah Willmer © Jasper Sanidad
Atlassian Offices / Studio Sarah Willmer © Jasper Sanidad
Atlassian Offices / Studio Sarah Willmer © Jasper Sanidad
Atlassian Offices / Studio Sarah Willmer © Jasper Sanidad
Atlassian Offices / Studio Sarah Willmer © Jasper Sanidad
Atlassian Offices / Studio Sarah Willmer Section 01
Atlassian Offices / Studio Sarah Willmer Section 02
Atlassian Offices / Studio Sarah Willmer Section 03
Atlassian Offices / Studio Sarah Willmer Plan 01
Atlassian Offices / Studio Sarah Willmer Plan 02

Atlassian Offices / Studio Sarah Willmer originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 20 Jul 2012.

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Southbank Centre Shortlist Announced!

Queen Elizabeth Hall and Hayward Gallery © Morley von Sternberg

The UK’s largest arts centre, occupying an 21-acre site that sits in the midst of London’s most vibrant cultural quarter on the South Bank of the Thames, has announced the shortlist of architects competing to head the refurbishment and renewal of the Queen Elizabeth Hall, Purcell Room and Hayward Gallery complex. According to a statement released by the Southbank Centre, the project plans to bring the performance spaces and galleries in the complex up to the standard of the recently transformed Royal Festival Hall and will address current urgent problems including poor access to and the upgrading of the stages and galleries; sub-standard back stage areas; and worn out services.

The seven shortlisted practices are:

Bennetts Associates Architects
Eric Parry Architects
Fielden Clegg Bradley Studios
Grimshaw Architects LLP
Heneghan Peng Architects
OMA
Van Heyningen and Haward

Before finalizing the refurbishment plans Southbank Centre will explore a more ambitious project, which would reclaim unused and underused space to transform the whole of this complex and deliver more flexible cultural and social use in line with the successful and popular festival program across art forms. To inform how Southbank Centre might do this a conservation management plan is being drafted in consultation with Lambeth Council, English Heritage and the Twentieth Century Society to better understand both the significant elements of the architecture and how the full potential of the site can be realized as envisaged by the original architects.

The lead architect will be appointed in the autumn. Southbank Centre will be required to complete a second application to Arts Council England showing plans at a detailed stage of design and development by September 2013.

This is the next stage of the Rick Mather master plan for the site and builds on the transformation of the Royal Festival Hall, with the creation of a new public square (Southbank Centre Square), lively restaurants and shops across the site and new landscaping (with an external lift) to provide a more accessible, exciting, welcoming site that is regularly artistically animated, as well as the recent transformation of Jubilee Gardens.

via Southbank Centre

Southbank Centre Shortlist Announced! originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 06 Jul 2012.

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KAA Design Group wins Best Adaptive Reuse for Latitude 33

Courtesy of KAA Design Group

Latitude 33, a luxurious collection of beach-side homes ranging from townhouses, penthouses, and single floor units, was partially designed from a forty year-old, nine-storey “eye sore for the neighborhood” that was once an office building. The mixed use development, designed by KAA Design Group, includes residential and commercial spaces in Marina del Rey in Southern California. The strategic decisions involved with designing these apartments from an early 197os office building earned Latitude 33 two Gold Nugget Merit Awards, one of which was for Best Adaptive Reuse.

Read on for more after the break.

Before; Courtesy of KAA Design Group

Adaptive Reuse comes with its share of challenging design constraints, working within the existing conditions of the nine-story unoccupied office building.  The developers of Sunbrook were aware of the stigma associated with the trend to transform an unused building into the expected penthouse tower within the community in Venice.  The high-end, modern design is geared toward adding value to the community and enriching its architectural identity.  Before this project was initiated, the vacant building was a constant reminder of the economic downturn. Now, Latitude 33 has provided a community and building that brings a breath new life into the neighborhood.

Courtesy of KAA Design Group

There are three collections within the Latitude 33 community which offer mixed use programs and a range of living conditions and prices. These distinct living arrangement include:  The Sky Collection, the Beach Collection and the Boardwalk Collection. The redesigned building now houses penthouse apartments called The Sky Collection. It is a mixed use community that has live/work residences, high-end boutique-style retail at ground-level and open-air floor plans that offer panoramic views of the ocean just three blocks away.

Courtesy of KAA Design Group

The Boardwalk Collection includes two-story townhomes and flats within a lush landscaped courtyard.  Units include private outdoor areas that blend the transition between indoor and outdoor.  The Beach Collection is inspired by the strand homes of Southern California and include three-level beach bungalows.  They offer private gardens and views of the Venice Grand Canals, landscaped yards and access to the beach.

Courtesy of KAA Design Group

The community is geared toward creating a fluid procession between the architecture and the landscape.  Sculptural elements and benches within a community gardens become welcoming to members of the community and add to the bonds between neighbors.  Of the inspiration for Latitude 33, principal of KAA Design Group, Grant Kirkpatrick says,” the landscape elements blur the boundaries between the built structure and its surroundings, in the application of nature-inspired and organic materials and in the infusion of light, air and personality”.

Courtesy of KAA Design Group

Kirkpatrick also notes that The Sky Tower and the Boardwalk Podium were designed to be more pedestrian friendly, enriching the streetside experience of the architecture by programming the lower stories with high-end boutiques and designing a facade that seamlessly wraps the tower’s edge, by day defined by clear panes, intermixed with organic screens, and at night by a glowing translucent band illuminating the building’s base.

Latitude 33 /  KAA Design Group (1) Before; Courtesy of KAA Design Group
Latitude 33 /  KAA Design Group (2) Courtesy of KAA Design Group
Latitude 33 /  KAA Design Group (3) Courtesy of KAA Design Group
Latitude 33 /  KAA Design Group (4) Courtesy of KAA Design Group
Latitude 33 /  KAA Design Group (5) Courtesy of KAA Design Group
Latitude 33 /  KAA Design Group (6) Courtesy of KAA Design Group
Latitude 33 /  KAA Design Group (7) Courtesy of KAA Design Group
Latitude 33 /  KAA Design Group (8) Courtesy of KAA Design Group
Latitude 33 /  KAA Design Group (9) Courtesy of KAA Design Group
Latitude 33 /  KAA Design Group (10) Courtesy of KAA Design Group
Latitude 33 /  KAA Design Group (11) Courtesy of KAA Design Group
Latitude 33 /  KAA Design Group (12) Courtesy of KAA Design Group
Latitude 33 /  KAA Design Group (13) Courtesy of KAA Design Group
Latitude 33 /  KAA Design Group (14) Courtesy of KAA Design Group
Latitude 33 /  KAA Design Group (15) Unit Plan 1; Courtesy of KAA Design Group
Latitude 33 /  KAA Design Group (16) Unit Plan 2; Courtesy of KAA Design Group
Latitude 33 /  KAA Design Group (17) Unit Plan 3; Courtesy of KAA Design Group
Latitude 33 /  KAA Design Group (18) Unit Plan 4; Courtesy of KAA Design Group

Palais de Tokyo Expansion / Lacaton & Vassal

© Florent Michel

Opened in 1937, the Palais de Tokyo has suffered from decades of neglect and subsequent deterioration. Housing modern art in its early stages of life, it soon was relegated to the sidelines upon completion of the Centre Pompidou in late 70’s, which took over the role of hosting modern art exhibitions. Sitting dormant and unused for latter part of the 20th century, it has since been reinvigorated by architects Lacaton & Vassal, opening back up to the public in 2002. The stripped down structure that exposes and embraces raw materials has recently received a new expansion by the architects who breathed new life into it. More details after the break.

© Florent Michel

The gallery has grown from 7000 to 22,000 square meters.  chose to stay true to their original restoration where everything was kept raw – honesty of materiality. Thus, when they broke through into an unused basement, the remnants of the process involved with breaking through have been celebrated and left exposed, rather than plastered over.  Free from the typical clean-room type atmospheres of other museums, the building elements are allowed to age unencumbered which adds to the patina of a structure that has stood for nearly a century. Though the bottom basement layers exert an almost expansive tomb-like aura, the upper levels bask in the warmth of sunlight through glass roofs.

© Florent Michel

Another interesting aspect of the museum is its lack of dictated routes that are typical of other galleries. The visitor in Palais is free to roam and explore uninhibited through the building’s below grade grotto, and its upper level exhibition spaces. Perhaps it is the rawness of the materials that are left to mingle and juxtapose the slight imposition of technology such as strip lights screwed into existing brick or the exposed cables running through the spaces that make Palais de Tokyo so different from its sibling museums.

© Florent Michel

To see more of the Palais de Tokyo visit their site here.

All images were provide by architectural photographer Florent Michel. Be sure to scroll through the gallery to view more images of Palais de Tokyo.

Palais de Tokyo Expansion by Lacaton & Vassal (1) © Florent Michel
Palais de Tokyo Expansion by Lacaton & Vassal (2) © Florent Michel
Palais de Tokyo Expansion by Lacaton & Vassal (3) © Florent Michel
Palais de Tokyo Expansion by Lacaton & Vassal (4) © Florent Michel
Palais de Tokyo Expansion by Lacaton & Vassal (5) © Florent Michel
Palais de Tokyo Expansion by Lacaton & Vassal (6) © Florent Michel
Palais de Tokyo Expansion by Lacaton & Vassal (7) © Florent Michel
Palais de Tokyo Expansion by Lacaton & Vassal (8) © Florent Michel
Palais de Tokyo Expansion by Lacaton & Vassal (9) © Florent Michel
Palais de Tokyo Expansion by Lacaton & Vassal (10) © Florent Michel
Palais de Tokyo Expansion by Lacaton & Vassal (11) © Florent Michel
Palais de Tokyo Expansion by Lacaton & Vassal (12) © Florent Michel
Palais de Tokyo Expansion by Lacaton & Vassal (13) © Florent Michel

Appartment in Makrygianni / Hiboux ARCHITECTURE

Courtesy of Hiboux ARCHITECTURE

Architect: Hiboux ARCHITECTURE – Dimitris Theodoropoulos, Marianna Xyntaraki, Maria Tsigara
Location: Makrygianni District, ,
Project title: Appartment in Makrygianni district, Athens
Area: 140 sqm
Completion: 2011
Photographs: Viewport architectural images, Hiboux ARCHITECTURE

  

Courtesy of Hiboux ARCHITECTURE

The owner’s desire for a calm and visually clear interior landscape formed the starting point of this project. The first visit to the site took place while the building was still under construction. The space in question was long and rectangular, with two enclosed long sides and two sides completely open. This openness meant sweeping urban views over Athens penetrated deep into the space; it informed the entire design process. On one side stand Filopappou Hill, an assortment of typical Athenian apartment blocks and, moreover, the dark mass of the new Acropolis Museum sitting directly beneath a view to the Parthenon. On the other side lie the yards and backs of buildings, Syngrou Avenue and, in the distance, Mount Hymettus.

Courtesy of Hiboux ARCHITECTURE

It was decided that the flow through this rectangular space should not be blocked by the addition of interior or exterior walls. The openings at each end would remain clear from edge to edge through the use of large glass panes. The interior space was kept completely open plan, with no dividing walls, in order to enhance the expansive nature of the space.

Courtesy of Hiboux ARCHITECTURE

Inside the apartment, the views over the fragmented cityscape stand in contrast to the calm white interior landscape. Free-standing furniture “islands” in high-gloss white lacquer form passageways and spaces, but without boundaries. These clean rectangular blocks float on a white floor laid with large blocks of Ariston marble. Lacquer and glass sliding doors hidden in the islands and in the side-walls close off the main bedroom, shower, wardrobe, and guest room. The sliding of these doors redefines the space, revealing or concealing various functions from view.

section

Matte white-lacquered surfaces that lie parallel to the long sides of the space define two zones that house storage solutions, bathrooms, an office-cum-bar, a projection screen and library, a guest fold-down wall bed, and the kitchen. By hiding a majority of functions away behind the long side walls, and by using “islands” in the intervening space, the desired extreme open plan is achieved. The elements can be arranged so that nothing blocks free movement through the space, or to create three distinct zones. The sofa, dining table and bed are the only pieces of furniture in plain sight.

The dark grey ceiling acts as the backdrop to the “skyline” created by the dominant white forms in the space. The dark colour means the ceiling recedes from sight, and undermines the notion of a white box.

Office Refurbishment / hiboux Architecture Courtesy of Hiboux Architecture
Office Refurbishment / hiboux Architecture Courtesy of hiboux Architecture
Office Refurbishment / hiboux Architecture Courtesy of Hiboux Architecture
Office Refurbishment / hiboux Architecture Courtesy of Hiboux Architecture
Office Refurbishment / hiboux Architecture Courtesy of Hiboux Architecture
Office Refurbishment / hiboux Architecture Courtesy of hiboux Architecture
Office Refurbishment / hiboux Architecture Courtesy of hiboux Architecture
Office Refurbishment / hiboux Architecture Courtesy of Hiboux Architecture
Office Refurbishment / hiboux Architecture Courtesy of Hiboux Architecture
Office Refurbishment / hiboux Architecture Courtesy of Hiboux Architecture
Office Refurbishment / hiboux Architecture Courtesy of Hiboux Architecture
Office Refurbishment / hiboux Architecture Courtesy of Hiboux Architecture
Office Refurbishment / hiboux Architecture Courtesy of Hiboux Architecture
Office Refurbishment / hiboux Architecture Courtesy of Hiboux Architecture
Office Refurbishment / hiboux Architecture Courtesy of Hiboux Architecture
Office Refurbishment / hiboux Architecture Courtesy of Hiboux Architecture
Office Refurbishment / hiboux Architecture Courtesy of Hiboux Architecture
Office Refurbishment / hiboux Architecture Courtesy of Hiboux Architecture
Office Refurbishment / hiboux Architecture Courtesy of Hiboux Architecture
Office Refurbishment / hiboux Architecture Courtesy of Hiboux Architecture
Office Refurbishment / hiboux Architecture Courtesy of Hiboux Architecture
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