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The 4 Coolest “High Line” Inspired Projects

LEGO Bridge by MEGX

New York City’s High Line has been such a success – both as an urban renewal project and a money-making tourist attraction – that it’s spawned quite a number of Copy Cats around the world (we found 18, listed after the break, but no doubt there’s many  more…). Many, however, are more yawn-inducing than awe-inspiring. The following four projects are notably awesome exceptions.

Find out which projects made the cut, after the break…

LEGO Bridge by Megx.

4. “LEGO Bridge” – Wuppertal, Germany

The colorful LEGO-inspired bridge, painted last fall, is part of an Urban renewal project to redevelop the city of Wuppertal’s old Railway into a 10-mile cycle path. City officials hope it will “reinvigorate the city and increase residents’ quality of life.”

Unfortunately, no actual LEGOS were used in the making of this bridge; the illusion was designed by street artist Martin Heuwold of MEGX.

Hofbogen, designed by DOEPEL STRIJKERS.

3. “Hofbogen” – Rotterdam, The Netherlands

This plan of DOEPEL STRIJKERS to turn an old elevated train track in downtown Rotterdam into a commercial strip and elevated park, has an ingenious twist. The plan integrates city heating into the design: industrial waste heat will be used to warm the pre-war buildings along its trajectory, radically reducing their CO2 footprint.

The Transbay Center Project in San Francisco hopes to transform the Transbay Terminal with an extensive rooftop park.

2. “Transbay Transit Center” – San Francisco, California

Once a bustling train station, the Transbay Transit Center has been in a slow demise since WW2. Even though it’s been reconstituted as a bus terminal, the facility no longer serves much purpose in the community.

The proposed idea will retrofit the old, outdated building and turn it into a new high-speed rail terminus – but above the terminal is the real show-stopper. The 5.4 acre elevated park, designed by Pelli Clark Pelli Architecture, will incorporate cafes, retail areas, playgrounds, public art exhibits, an amphitheater and display gardens with climate-appropriate plants. It should be stroll-ready by 2017.

Courtesy of James Ramsey and Dan Barasch

1. “The Delancey Underground” – New York City, New York

As the Highline has everyone looking up, James Ramsey and Dan Barasch are asking people to start looking down. Satellite engineer turned architect, James Ramsey has developed a fiber-optic technology that will naturally light and bring life to the abandoned Williamsburg Bridge Trolley Terminal below the streets of New York City. The renderings are positively sci-fi, but if this Kickstarter Project becomes a reality, the results could be truly fantastic.

641 Avenue of the Americas / Cook + Fox Architects

©Cook+Fox Architects

Architect: Cook+Fox Architects
Location: New York, NY
Client: Cook+Fox Architects LLP
Completion: July 2006
Size: 12,121 SF

This interior design project from 2006 by Cook + Fox Architects is the first LEED Platinum certified project in New York. It is an office space in one of New York City’s early 20th Century skyscrapers, one that still has much of its architectural details intact, along with some new features that make it a sustainable factor within the city’s urban terrain.

©Bilyana Dimitrova

The office space at 641 Avenue of the Americas is inspired by the desire to create a healthy and productive work environment.  Among its many features, the most prominent is the 3600 square foot rooftop garden that features drought-tolerant, low-maintenance sedum species with a flexible, nylon module system called Green Paks.  The green roof contributes to reducing storm water runoff, reducing the building’s cooling load and fighting the heat island effect in New York City.

©Cook+Fox Architects

The roof was a made possible by Cook + Fox volunteers that hand-laid the Green Paks and prepared plants.  It also benefited from the collaboration with the Gaia Institute in which they studied water retention and growth rates of the sedums to choose those most beneficial to the environment of the rooftop garden.  As part of a larger effort to inform environmental decisions among designers and architects, the Gaia Institute was also invited to test  the success of various soil aggregate compositions.

©Cook+Fox Architects

This project has been used as an example by Mayor Bloomberg’s PlaNYC campaign to advocate long-term sustainability goals, strategies and possibilities afforded by even the most urban environments.  Regular tours of office give a better look at the various systems at play that make this office a healthy environment and an example of a sustainable approach to interior design.

©Cook+Fox Architects

The office has many features that contribute to its LEED Platinum status.  It has an upgraded HVAC system, operable windows, low-VOC materials, and benefits from the amount of sunlight that the office gets over the course of the day.  These features contribute to natural ventilation that help protect the indoor air quality year round.  Water-saving strategies include waterless urinals, dual-flush toilets, and motion sensor lavatory faucets.  These contribute to a 40% reduction in water consumption.  Natural materials were also selected for the office, those which have durability, are local and have ecologically friendly features.  These help the office act as an experimental zone, or “learning lab”, to develop materials that are more environmentally responsible. In 2011, the interior design made it on the AIA’s Interiors Merit Winners.

MEP Engineer: Flack+Kurtz, Inc.
Green Roof Consultant: Green Roof Blocks/Green Paks
Lighting Consultant: Cline Bettridge Bernstein Lighting Design, Inc.
HVAC Controls Consultant: Trane New York
General Contractor: Stephens Construction
Millwork: Woodweave Furniture Company
Commissioning Agent: Jaros, Baum, and Bolles
Graphic Design Consultant: Doyle Partners
Code Consultant: JAM Consultants, Inc.

Check out some of Cook+Fox Architects’ other projects featured on ArchDaily here.

641 Avenue of the Americas / Cook + Fox (1) ©Cook+Fox Architects
641 Avenue of the Americas / Cook + Fox (2) ©Cook+Fox Architects
641 Avenue of the Americas / Cook + Fox (3) ©Bilyana Dimitrova
641 Avenue of the Americas / Cook + Fox (4) ©Cook+Fox Architects
641 Avenue of the Americas / Cook + Fox (5) ©Cook+Fox Architects
641 Avenue of the Americas / Cook + Fox (6) ©Cook+Fox Architects
641 Avenue of the Americas / Cook + Fox (7) ©Cook+Fox Architects

641 Avenue of the Americas / Cook + Fox Architects originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 05 Jul 2012.

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Diller Scofidio + Renfro Unveils New Columbia University Medical Building

Exterior View South – Courtesy of CUMC

Columbia University has been at the forefront of medical education for more than two centuries, as it was the first medical school in the United States to award the M.D. degree in 1770. Now, the Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) has announced plans for a new, state-of-the-art medical and graduate education building that reflects how they believe medicine is and should be taught, learned and practiced in the 21st century.

Located on the CUMC campus in the Washington Heights community of Northern Manhattan, the 14-story facility will aim to achieve LEED Gold certification and incorporate technologically advanced classrooms, collaboration spaces, and a modern simulation center. The design is led by Diller Scofidio + Renfro, in collaboration with Gensler as executive architect.

Continue after the break for more details!

Grandstand Entry – Courtesy of CUMC

“The new Medical and Graduate Education Building will be the social and academic anchor of the CUMC campus,” said Elizabeth Diller, principal-in-charge of the project Diller Scofidio + Renfro. “Spaces for education and socializing are intertwined to encourage new forms of collaborative learning among students and faculty.”

The facility will create a community of students and facility from all four CUMC schools (P&S, Nursing, Dental Medicine and the Mailman School of Public Health) as well as the biomedical departments of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. The integration of mixed curriculum and an emphasis on team-based learning is reflected throughout the building.

Lobby – Courtesy of CUMC

The design weaves together areas for study and other activities that are important in a 21st-century university building. It features technology-enabled classrooms; a state-of-the-art medical simulation center that will replicate clinics, operating rooms and other real world medical environments; innovative learning facilities for both collaboration and quiet study; an auditorium and event areas with integrated technology; centralized student support services; student lounges and cafés; and multiple purpose outdoor spaces, including a  terrace with views of the Hudson River.

Elevated Cafe – Courtesy of CUMC

The “Study Cascade” is the principle design strategy of the building – a network of social and study spaces distributed across oversized landings along an intricate 14-story stair. The Study Cascade creates a single interconnected space the height of the building, stretching from the ground floor lobby to the top of the building, and conducive to collaborative, team-based learning and teaching. The “Study Cascade” interiors are complemented by a distributed network of south-facing outdoor “rooms” and terraces that are clad with cement panels and wood. While the “Study Cascade” provides an organizational strategy for the building’s interior, it is also an urban gesture that, with its glass façade, aims to become a visual landmark at the northern limit of Columbia University’s medical campus. The northern face of the building houses space for classrooms, clinical simulation and administration and support.

Cafe – Courtesy of CUMC

The landmark building is expect to break ground in early 2013 and pierce the Manhattan skyline upon completion mid-2017.

“The new building provides upgraded education facilities that reflect the eminence of one of the top medical schools in the world. Both the building and the newly created green space that will surround it will also revitalize our campus in ways that will benefit both our medical center and the entire community,” said Lee Goldman, M.D., dean of the faculties of health sciences and medicine at CUMC and executive vice president for health and biomedical sciences at Columbia University.

Auditorium Entry – Courtesy of CUMC

Diller Scofidio + Renfro Unveils New Columbia University Medical Building (1) Exterior View South - Courtesy of CUMC
Diller Scofidio + Renfro Unveils New Columbia University Medical Building (2) Lobby - Courtesy of CUMC
Diller Scofidio + Renfro Unveils New Columbia University Medical Building (3) Auditorium Entry - Courtesy of CUMC
Diller Scofidio + Renfro Unveils New Columbia University Medical Building (4) Grandstand Entry - Courtesy of CUMC
Diller Scofidio + Renfro Unveils New Columbia University Medical Building (5) Panorama Room - Courtesy of CUMC
Diller Scofidio + Renfro Unveils New Columbia University Medical Building (6) Cafe - Courtesy of CUMC
Diller Scofidio + Renfro Unveils New Columbia University Medical Building (7) Floating Terrace - Courtesy of CUMC
Diller Scofidio + Renfro Unveils New Columbia University Medical Building (8) Elevated Cafe - Courtesy of CUMC

Diller Scofidio + Renfro Unveils New Columbia University Medical Building originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 03 Jul 2012.

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Challenge: REskin an Aging Building in NYC

In a call for a Sustainable New York City, Mayor Bloomberg stated: “Given that buildings account for more than 80 percent of all municipal greenhouse gas emissions, constructing buildings with energy-efficient features is essential to reducing those emissions, and DDC plays a critically important role in that work.”

This is a great idea for new construction, but what about the existing, aging buildings? Most older buildings were built in a time when energy costs were low and the exterior walls were used less for energy performance and more for structural integrity. Knocking these buildings down to start over would cause a greater environmental impact due to the tons of waste material that would need to be discarded. So, what is the solution? REskin. DesignByMany‘s challenges you to cleverly reskin a decaying urban building on the corner of Broadway and Reade St in New York City. Submissions can range from a focused investigation to an entire reskinning of the building.

The REskin challenge is sponsored by Autodesk and media partners ArchDaily. Winners will receive a full license of Autodesk Revit Architecture 2013. Check out the building and learn more after the break!

If the submission is a focused investigation, a wholistic application of the investigation must be represented. Submissions are encouraged, but not required, to incorporate sustainable technologies and strategies into the skin. The skin should be awesome, inventive, and buildable.

Assuming that the budget is not endless, each component of the skin should be “buildable.” As part of the submission, provide a brief fabrication method/proposal that clearly outlines what each component is made of and how it will be assembled. All final submissions must be in Revit “.rvt” format.

The Building

Context:

Manhattan, NY
Location: 289 Broadway

Objectives:

Design shall not restrict sidewalk circulation.
Design should conceptually enhance the building’s performance and efficiency without the loss of views, comfort, and attractiveness. .
Design should creatively use/expand the repertoire of tools native to Autodesk Revit and its conceptual modeling environment.
Design should be beautiful!

Datasets: (At the bottom of this post)

Revit 2013 model
Context Photos

Precedent:

TowerRenewalGuidelines
Reskinning Awards 2010
Allied Works
15 Union Square West
University of Technology Tower in Sydney

Resources:

30-Day trial of Autodesk Revit can be found here. Students may download Autodesk Revit Architecture from the Autodesk Student Community.

Videos on Curtain Walls:

Basic Curtain Wall
Curtain Wall Workflow
Custom Curtain Wall Panels
Pattern based Curtain Panels01
Pattern based Curtain Panels02
Intro to Adaptive Components
Hexagon Curtain Panels
Curved Panels
Reporting Parameters for Planarity
Pattern-based Curtain Panels

Prize:

Full license of Autodesk Revit Architecture 2013.

Built for Building Information Modeling (BIM), Autodesk Revit Architecture helps you to capture and analyze design concepts, and more accurately maintain your vision through design, documentation, and construction. Judges:

Zach Kron
Greg Schleusner
TBD
DesignByMany Community

Submission:

Post editable documentation (3d) as 2013 Revit file (.rvt)
Post Fabrication/Construction Brief
Post images (optional)
Post diagrams explaining approach (optional)
Post video explaining approach (optional)

Deadline:

Submission July 9th 2012 at 11:59 pm (UTC/GMT -5)
Community Voting July 16th 2012 at 11:59 pm (UTC/GMT -5)

More information here! 

Challenge: REskin an Aging Building in NYC (1) Challenge: REskin an Aging Building in NYC (1)
Challenge: REskin an Aging Building in NYC (2) The Building

Challenge: REskin an Aging Building in NYC originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 02 Jul 2012.

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Cooper-Hewitt selects DS+R to help with Expansion

Back Garden © Rob Corder

New York City-based Diller Scofidio + Renfro has been chosen to design the gallery and visitor experience at the historic Smithsonian Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum – the only museum in the United States that is exclusively devoted to historic and contemporary design. The New York City landmark is currently under undergoing an extensive, $64 million transformation that will expand gallery space by sixty-percent. The new environment will be laced with interactive elements in which Local Projects will help integrate into the gallery space as they have been selected as participatory media designer.

The contemporary vision of the re:design aims to become a modern exemplar for museum design, while still preserving the historic Carnegie mansion. The renovation is led by Gluckman Mayner Architects and Beyer Blinder Belle. It will achieve LEED certification and is scheduled to be complete by 2014.

“It is because of their keen abilities to translate ideas and concepts into boundary-stretching design that Cooper-Hewitt selected DS+R and Local Projects as the ideal partners to help re-envision the design of its gallery, visitor and participatory digital experiences,” explained Bill Moggridge, director of the museum.

Via Arts Beat, Diller Scofidio + Renfro
Photo by Flickr user rocor, licensed through Creative Commons.

Bank of America Tower at One Bryant Park / Cook + Fox Architects

© +Fox Architects

The Bank of America Tower at One Bryant Park in midtown New York, designed by Cook + Fox Architects, is the first commercial high-rise to achieve LEED Platinum certification.  The design and high performance of this building is intended to set a new standard for commercial construction and for the office-work environment.  By focusing on ways to emphasize daylight, fresh air and a connection to the outdoors, the architects redefine the parameters of the skyscraper as more than a glass box.

More on the strategies implemented in this project after the break.

© David Sundberg / Esto

The 55-story, 2.2 million square foot project is a new addition to the towering blocks around Bryant Park in midtown and its dense context already challenges the role of the architecture.  Cook+Fox establish a highly transparent corner entry, blending the public street with the private office building.  It gives the lobby plenty of daylight and becomes a a mild threshold between the city life and the work day.  Green roofs and an Urban Garden Room bring the park nearby into the architecture and, combined with the natural lobby materials, emphasizes the natural qualities that can be found within city life.

© Cook+Fox Architects

The form of the building deviates from its footprint, increasing the level of surface area exposed to day light and giving oriented views onto Bryant Park.  Sustainable measures keep the building well insulated and protected from excess heat gain.  The curtain wall is made of low-e glass and heat-reflecting ceramic frit.  The building also incorporates water-saving measures such as waterless urinals, greywater recycling, and rainwater harvesting systems.  The building also filters the air that is delivered to the offices and can be individually controlled.  Overnight, a thermal ice-storage tank in the cellar produces ice in order to reduce peak demand on the city’s electric grid.  A 4.6 megwatt cogeneration plant covers 70% of the building’s annual energy use with clean, efficient power.

© Cook+Fox Architects

With such thoughtful design decisions about the quality of the work environment and the effects of the building on the natural environment, the Bank of America Tower at One Bryant Park may prove how efficient high-rise buildings can be, especially for dense urban environments as New York.

Architects: Cook + Fox Architects, LLP
Location: New York, NY
Client: Bank of America at One Bryant Park, LLP, a joint venture between The Durst Organization and Bank of America
Completion: May 2010
Size: 2,100,000
SF Executive Architect: Adamson Associates Architects
Mechanical Engineer: Jaros, Baum & Bolles
Structural Engineer: Severud Associates

For more, check out this video featuring Principal Richard Cook explaining how biophilia informed the design.

One Bryant Park / Cook+Fox (1) © Cook+Fox Architects
One Bryant Park / Cook+Fox (2) © Cook+Fox Architects
One Bryant Park / Cook+Fox (3) © Cook+Fox Architects
One Bryant Park / Cook+Fox (4) © Cook+Fox Architects
One Bryant Park / Cook+Fox (5) © David Sundberg / Esto
One Bryant Park / Cook+Fox (6) © Cook+Fox Architects
One Bryant Park / Cook+Fox (7) © David Sundberg / Esto
One Bryant Park / Cook+Fox (8) © Cook+Fox Architects
One Bryant Park / Cook+Fox (9) © Cook+Fox Architects
One Bryant Park / Cook+Fox (10) Plan 01
One Bryant Park / Cook+Fox (11) Diagram 01
One Bryant Park / Cook+Fox (12) Diagram 02
One Bryant Park / Cook+Fox (13) Diagram 03

New York City’s first Kahn Structure nears Completion

Aerial image courtesy Amiaga Photographers, Inc. www.amiaga.com

Nearly 40 years after Welfare Island was renamed to honor President Franklin D. Roosevelt (FDR), the Four Freedoms Park is nearly complete. The four-acre park, located on the southern tip of Roosevelt Island in , honors the 32nd U.S. President and the four essential freedoms he believed in. The legendary architect Louis I. Kahn , FAIA (1901-1974) was commissioned to design the memorial in the early seventies and completed the design right before his unfortunate death in 1974. As New York City approached bankruptcy, the project was put on hold until March 29, 2010. Now, many are anxiously anticipating the park’s grand opening that will take place this Fall.

Continue after the break to learn about the story and design of Four Freedoms Park.

During a period of urban renewal in the late 1960s, New York City Mayor John Lindsay proposed reinvent the beloved island, stating: “It has long seemed to us that an ideal place for a memorial to FDR would be on Welfare Island, which…could be easily renamed in his honor… It would face the sea he loved, the Atlantic he bridged, the Europe he helped to save, the United Nations he inspired.” Therefore, in 1973, Governor Nelson Rockefeller and Mayor Lindsay announced the appointment of the internationally acclaimed Louis Kahn as the memorial’s architect.

Louis Kahn’s iconic sketch of Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park. Credit: Louis I. Kahn Collection, University of Pennsylvania and the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission

Kahn, an admirer of Roosevelt, credited his ability to support his family during the early years of his practice to FDR, as housing and community planning projects part of Roosevelt’s New Deal programs made up much of his commissions. Throughout the design process, Kahn would spend much of the review meetings in reminiscing about Roosevelt and his policies.

The “Room” from the East River – Credit: Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park, LLC

One aspect of the Roosevelt philosophy that seemed especially powerful to Kahn was FDR’s belief that all disputes could be solved with a peaceful discussion, similarly to a family sitting around the dinner table. Kahn interpreted this concept with the creation of the “Room” – a 72-foot square plaza framed on three sides by 6-foot x 6-foot x 12-foot high granite columns, which is meant for peaceful contemplation and serves as the park’s final destination.

Credit: Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park, LLC

Kahn emphasized the triangular shape of the site and employed a “forces perspectival parti” to draw and focus the visitor’s attention to the colossal bronze head of FDR, located at the threshold of the ‘Room’. As visitors walk along the gently sloping, granite-paved promenades lined by large shade trees and separated by a vast garden, their attention remains indirectly focused on that final destination space.

Sculpture Court – Credit: Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park, LLC

The bronze sculpture of FDR was created by the great American portrait sculpture, Jo Davidson, who modeled it during Roosevelt’s first term in 1933. It stands out from the white granite, allowing visitors to see it from a distance.

President Roosevelt delivering the Four Freedoms speech. Credit: public domain

Engraved on the granite walls of the “Room” and throughout the site are notable quotes taken from President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s eminent Four Freedoms speech in January 6, 1941, as FDR looked forward to a world founded on these four human freedoms: freedom of speech and expression, freedom of worship, freedom from want, and freedom from fear.

Plan of Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park. Credit: Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park, LLC

Additionally, a navel theme guides Kahn’s design as a tribute to FDR’s love and connection to the sea. The symmetrical design is based off a centerline, following the standard in navel . The final scheme acts as a prow to the island’s “boat”, looking out towards the city and the waters of the North Atlantic Ocean.

Aerial Cityscape Rendering – Credit: Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park, LLC

Kahn finished the design before he unexpectedly died from a heart attack in New York’s Penn Station. However, the project was placed on hold as the Governor became Vice President of the United States and the City of New York approached bankruptcy.

Thankfully, due to the efforts of family members, architects and many others, construction of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park began on March 29, 2010 – 38 years after its announcement.

East Promenade and Monumental Stair – Credit: Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park, LLC

The first granite foundations stones were laid in September of 2010 and the “Room” began to take shape in September 2011. This April, a stainless steel capsule containing memorabilia relating to the country’s 32nd president was buried on site. Now, as finishing touches are being completed and the Four Freedoms Park will celebrate it’s grand opening in October of this year – 40 years after the project was first initiated.

This will be the first Kahn structure in New York.

Four Freedoms Park, Narrated by Orson Welles:

New York City’s first Kahn Structure nears Completion (1) Aerial image courtesy Amiaga Photographers, Inc. www.amiaga.com
New York City’s first Kahn Structure nears Completion (2) President Roosevelt delivering the Four Freedoms speech. Credit: public domain
New York City’s first Kahn Structure nears Completion (3) Aerial Cityscape Rendering - Credit: Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park, LLC
New York City’s first Kahn Structure nears Completion (4) Credit: Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park, LLC
New York City’s first Kahn Structure nears Completion (5) Forecourt - Credit: Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park, LLC
New York City’s first Kahn Structure nears Completion (6) Lawn Aerial - Credit: Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park, LLC
New York City’s first Kahn Structure nears Completion (7) East Promenade and Monumental Stair - Credit: Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park, LLC
New York City’s first Kahn Structure nears Completion (8) West Promenade and Monumental Stair - Credit: Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park, LLC
New York City’s first Kahn Structure nears Completion (9) Sculpture Court - Credit: Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park, LLC
New York City’s first Kahn Structure nears Completion (10) The "Room" from the East River - Credit: Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park, LLC
New York City’s first Kahn Structure nears Completion (11) Louis Kahn's iconic sketch of Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park. Credit: Louis I. Kahn Collection, University of Pennsylvania and the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission
New York City’s first Kahn Structure nears Completion (12) Map showing FDR Four Freedoms Park at the south tip of Roosevelt Island, New York City. Credit: Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park, LLC
New York City’s first Kahn Structure nears Completion (13) Plan of Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park. Credit: Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park, LLC

Green Carceri (Highline 4.0) / TARQUITECTOS

The Green Carceri, designed by TARQUITECTOS, arises as a natural extension of the High Line Park, connecting himself with the High Line and flying over the river, thus enabling a continuation of the public space underneath with the neighborhood to the height of the street and the docks. Winding around a series of vertical communication cores, the building allows both internal transit users and visitors to descend to the level of the street without having to enter the building. More images and architects’ description after the break.

We understand that the High Line Park can be considered as a real plant structure in the city, that with its consolidation has branched out and created new shoots and buds at their ends in the form of building program and public space. The Green Carceri would be one of these buds or branches, which are able to maintain the configuration of the branch that develops original but particularly adapted to a given functional and programmatic needs. The mixed program of the building includes a botanical research center, a library and a residential area, inserting a suspended mass of vegetation in an urban green space of significant size.

The proposed building, like the High Line and the orthogonal of the city, is essentially linear, although this linearity revolves around a cloistered space that is reached by going through what we like to call reconstructed labyrinth that protects users from the noise of the city. The building extrudes the original High line to suit programmatic requirements that arise for the new construction with complex and varied requirements ranging from lecture halls, libraries, laboratories, meeting rooms, canteens, city farms, and housing.

All the roof of the linear structure has been landscaped just as the High Line itself, allowing New Yorkers free access for the same, continuing the existing public space. The ramps that connect each o the levels, contains greenhouses that are used as a neighborhood farms, where botanist can meet the neighbors and teach them how to maintain and organize their crops.

The building has been thought to first reduce energy consumption, and then produce energy for its use. To reduce the building’s green roof allows for better insulation, and water collection. The water collected is stored and used for watering the plants, and for the cooling of the mechanical systems. The shape of the building allows for cross ventilation to cool the building during the summer. As a way of sun control, we devised a system of “brise soleil” that are painted with Thermochromic paint, that changes color depending on the heat applied. These allows the building to auto-regulate the radiation it receives by changing color.

To produce some of the energy used in the building, we have used new concepts, that great designers are starting to apply. In other cases we have used methods that have been around for decades.The wind in Manhattan and the proximity to the river gives us the opportunity to use Magenn power’s great balloon generators, Humdinger’s cables as a façade, or Windtronics by Honeywell to produce electricity. During the summer months UGE’s solar panels help power some of the mechanical systems. As a source of heat and natural gas, we have used Jean Pain’s compost methods, and integrated them on to our roofs landscape.

Architect: TARQUITECTOS

Location: 11TH Ave, W 18th Street, City, , United States

Consultants: Raul Rodriguez, Alfredo Lafuente, Guzman de Yarza, Marta Respaldiza

Program: Botanical institute, city farms, housing, restaurant, exhibition hall, auditorium

Area: Approximately 10,000 m2

Competition Year: 2012

Green Carceri (Highline 4.0) (1) Courtesy of TARQUITECTOS
Green Carceri (Highline 4.0) (2) Courtesy of TARQUITECTOS
Green Carceri (Highline 4.0) (3) Courtesy of TARQUITECTOS
Green Carceri (Highline 4.0) (4) Courtesy of TARQUITECTOS
Green Carceri (Highline 4.0) (5) Courtesy of TARQUITECTOS
Green Carceri (Highline 4.0) (6) Courtesy of TARQUITECTOS
Green Carceri (Highline 4.0) (7) Courtesy of TARQUITECTOS
Green Carceri (Highline 4.0) (8) Courtesy of TARQUITECTOS
Green Carceri (Highline 4.0) (9) Courtesy of TARQUITECTOS
Green Carceri (Highline 4.0) (10) Courtesy of TARQUITECTOS
Green Carceri (Highline 4.0) (11) Courtesy of TARQUITECTOS
Green Carceri (Highline 4.0) (12) competition board 01
Green Carceri (Highline 4.0) (13) competition board 02
Green Carceri (Highline 4.0) (14) competition board 03
Green Carceri (Highline 4.0) (15) competition board 04
Green Carceri (Highline 4.0) (16) competition board 05
Green Carceri (Highline 4.0) (17) competition board 06
Green Carceri (Highline 4.0) (18) competition board 07
Green Carceri (Highline 4.0) (19) competition board 08
Green Carceri (Highline 4.0) (20) competition board 09
Green Carceri (Highline 4.0) (21) competition board 10
Green Carceri (Highline 4.0) (22) competition board 11
Green Carceri (Highline 4.0) (23) competition board 12
Green Carceri (Highline 4.0) (24) competition board 13
Green Carceri (Highline 4.0) (25) competition board 14
Green Carceri (Highline 4.0) (26) competition board 15
Green Carceri (Highline 4.0) (27) competition board 16
Green Carceri (Highline 4.0) (28) competition board 17
Green Carceri (Highline 4.0) (29) competition board 18
Green Carceri (Highline 4.0) (30) competition board 19
Green Carceri (Highline 4.0) (31) competition board 20

Governors Island / West 8

© West 8 / Rogers Marvel Architects / / Mathews Nielsen / Urban Design +

Despite all of the preconceived notions about City being overpopulated, noisy and constantly bustling, there are numerous pockets within the five boroughs that offer respite from the city. This design strives to be one such pocket – or island. Governors Island has a long military history that dates back to 1776. It was controlled by the U.S. Government first for the U.S. Army and later for the Coast Guard. In 2002 the island was “sold” to the people of and declared a national monument. In 2010, Mayor Bloomberg and Governor Paterson agreed on the future operations, planning and redevelopment of the island through the Trust for Governors Island. Since then, the island has been open during the summer months for visitors to enjoy the unique seclusion offered by the the old military grounds. But the Trust had bigger plans. Choosing a team of architects, urban planners, designers and landscape architects that include Rogers Marvel Architects, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, Mathews Nielsen and led by West 8, plans began to unfold that would reimagine the island as a getaway for New Yorkers. Playing up to its isolation, its abundance of lawns and trees, and the views that it offers, the first phase of the plans have officially broken ground and are scheduled for completion in Fall 2013.

Check out what’s in store for Governors Island after the break.

© West 8 / Rogers Marvel Architects / Diller Scofidio + Renfro / Mathews Nielsen / Urban Design +

The design and plan for Governors Island is a balance between creating new environments for New Yorkers through the island’s natural landscape and location, and reinforcing the conditions under which the island has been used over the past several years. For several summers, Governors Island has been accessible to visitors with its huge lawns, bike paths, old red brick institutional buildings, occasional art shows and concerts. The development strategy is not to take any of these things away, but to organize them through sustainable solutions, new ideas gathered from New Yorkers, and a transformation of the topography in a way that creates new vertical conditions along the southern portion of the island.

© West 8 / Rogers Marvel Architects / Diller Scofidio + Renfro / Mathews Nielsen / Urban Design +

To address these basic design principles of levels of landscape architecture, engineering, architecture, and operations and maintenance, the team looked at these aspects to organize the planning of the project: program, topography, views, circulation, paving, edging, furnishings, planting and park buildings. When facing the existing conditions of the island, the team looked at the organizing principles of the site. The public buildings, along with the ferry landing, are clustered to the north of the island with additional buildings around its perimeter leaving an open lawn in the center. Within this void, the topography is planned, laid out in swooping paths, carving out hills that form a new topography. Circulation paths and paving fit between the green and planted spaces creating a lush and accessible park. The scale of the paths are suited for their uses and change dimension for the anticipated traffic from pedestrians, joggers and bicyclists. Such changes in scale also ensure that some paths will be more intimate while others can become points of gathering.

© West 8 / Rogers Marvel Architects / Diller Scofidio + Renfro / Mathews Nielsen / Urban Design +

Overlaid on this framework is a variety of programs inspired by New Yorkers’ suggestions and inherent properties of the island. Fields, bike paths, open lawns for spontaneous activities, a kayak launch, access to the water, festivals, fountains and shore side access for many passive activities such as bird watching and yoga, all with accessible views of New York City and New Jersey are just some of activities and programs planned for in the design. It is just as important to program the spaces as it is to allow the spaces to develop organically and flexibly over time. Part of the design keeps 20 acres of lawn free, as these spaces are most flexible for a variety of uses. The rolling topography of some of these lawns will become custom play areas that include monkey bars, slides, climbing areas, hammocks and swings for children and adults. The grounds are crisscrossed with a different bike routes and offer free bike rentals to visitors. Areas are designated throughout the park for art installations, sculptures and site-specific work that will change over time. Water access points will be introduced, allowing visitors to walk out over the water, access water taxis and the ferries, and use the kayak launches.

© West 8 / Rogers Marvel Architects / Diller Scofidio + Renfro / Mathews Nielsen / Urban Design +

The principle behind altering the typology is driven by function and program. Grading the ground of Governors Island provides adequate drainage for the site, while also creating vistas of the surrounding city and creating isolated and intimate moments within the rolling hill of the landscape. The changes in elevation also adds variation to the scale of the spaces; the hills become dividers between areas around the lawn. Such measures also extend to the overlooks and promenades within the park. These areas are designed to be elevated seven feet above grade. This creates broader views of the harbor, creates a topology that creates areas for seating and separates biking and active paths from passive activities, and raises tree roots above the future flood elevation line, ensuring decades of growth. This strategy will vary throughout different locations along the island. In some areas, the current grade elevation and the trees along it will be preserved. In other areas, where the grade will be raised, a wetland will be developed below.

© West 8 / Rogers Marvel Architects / Diller Scofidio + Renfro / Mathews Nielsen / Urban Design +

The foundation of the park – the plants and trees that will inhabit the island – are organized according to five planting strategies: using native plants of different plant communities that thrive and create habitats throughout the four seasons, plant to micro-climatic conditions, collect and reuse stormwater and gray water, plant more under the best soil conditions, and use the shading of the plants to organize activities in the park. The intention is also to create biodiversity through a range of habitats in order to attract native animals, birds, insects and fish to the site.

© West 8 / Rogers Marvel Architects / Diller Scofidio + Renfro / Mathews Nielsen / Urban Design +

Three main buildings are also planned for the site to serve the needs of the visitors. Soissons Ferry Pavilion is located towards the north shore of the island where the ferry lands out of Manhattan. It will serve as an indoor waiting area for the ferry. The Shell, designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro, will be located on the promenade and will have a sheltered space for sitting, dining, and relaxing in the shade along the water. Yankee Landing will be the arrival point from Brooklyn at the eastern end of the island. Designed by Rogers Marvel Architects, the two structures are a sheltered space for waiting, information and bicycle pickup.

Be sure to check out The Way It Works, a pdf organized by govislandpark.com to give an in-depth look at the design strategies and intentions of the design team. Click here for a detailed look at the areas that are part of the plan.

© West 8 / Rogers Marvel Architects / Diller Scofidio + Renfro / Mathews Nielsen / Urban Design +

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