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ToyBox / Studio Gil Architects

© Simon Kennedy

The concept for the ToyBox, a portable installation by Studio Gil Architects, focuses on being a giant toy box for children. A 1500mmX750mm box frame supports three “landscapes” at different heights. These “landscapes” act as a surface and support frame for a series of interactions and games accessed through a screen running along the perimeter of the box. More images and architects’ description after the break.

© Simon Kennedy

The design and execution of ToyBox came about using hand sketching, computer modelling / rendering, physical models, 2D CAD drawings and prototype models in a non-linear process. The final development phase resulted in a live working 3D model that was both design development tool and manufacturing / construction information.

© Simon Kennedy

Interactions and games were carefully chosen and strategically placed in response to ergonomics and the level of inquisitiveness of children at various ages. For instance, babies may use the frame to pull themselves up, toddlers respond to color, sound and touch, older children respond to games, and so forth.

© Simon Kennedy

The portable installation consists of 6mm MDF laser cut pieces which can be assembled and demounted following a sequenced tag system. The entire construction system relies on pressure joints for structural integrity, thus eliminating the use of adhesives, dowels, screws or nails.

© Simon Kennedy

Notions of scale and social interaction were also introduced with periscopes (projecting images of the surroundings from an adult’s eye level) and Polaroid cameras (both as a means of documenting moments but also to celebrate the novelty of an instant photograph). Other interactions included were games of Noughts and Crosses, xylophones, noise makers and a bubble gun.

© Simon Kennedy

ToyBox was featured in the Ten Plus One exhibition at the Gopher Hole (London, UK) 26-28th April 2012 : a unique look at 10 projects from both influential and emerging Architects and their approach to architectural design.

Architects: Studio Gil
Location: London,
Project Team: Pedro Gil, Christo Meyer, Dan O’Keefe
Drawings and Diagrams: Pedro Gil & Christo Meye
Completion Date: April 2012

ToyBox (1) © Simon Kennedy
ToyBox (2) © Simon Kennedy
ToyBox (3) © Simon Kennedy
ToyBox (4) © Simon Kennedy
ToyBox (5) © Simon Kennedy
ToyBox (6) © Simon Kennedy
ToyBox (7) © Simon Kennedy
ToyBox (8) © Simon Kennedy
ToyBox (9) © Simon Kennedy
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Olympic Shooting Venue / Magma Architecture

© J.L. Diehl

Architects: Magma Architecture
Location: London, England
Client: Mott Macdonald
Project Client: Olympic Delivery Authority
Total Footprint: 14,305 sqm
Total SeatingCapacity: 2,900
Architectural Design Team: Martin Ostermann with Lena Kleinheinz, Hendrik Bohle, Susanne Welcker, Pablo Carballal, Niko Mahler, Philipp Mecke, Diana Drogan, Veljko Markovicz, Manuel Welsky
Photographs: J.L. Diehl,

   

© J.L. Diehl

The London Shooting Venue will accommodate the events in 10, 25 and 50 m Sport Shooting at the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games in the southeast London district of Woolwich. The first Gold Medal of the London Olympic Games will be awarded at the venue for Women’s 10 m Air Pistol on the 28th July 2012. After the event the three temporary and mobile buildings will be dismantled and it is planned to rebuild them in Glasgow for the 2014 Commonwealth Games.

© J.L. Diehl

Shooting is a sport in which the results and progress of the competition are hardly visible to the eye of the spectator. The design of the shooting venue was driven by the desire to evoke an experience of flow and precision inherent in the shooting sport through the dynamically curving space. All three ranges were configured in a crisp, white double curved membrane façade studded with vibrantly colored openings. As well as animating the façade these dots operate as tensioning nodes. The 18.000 m² of phthalate-free pvc membrane functions best in this stretched format as it prevents the façade from flapping in the wind. The openings also act as ventilation intake and doorways at ground level. The fresh and light appearance of the buildings enhances the festive and celebrative character of the Olympic event.

© J.L. Diehl

The shooting venue is not situated in the Olympic Park, but has its own location in Woolwich on the grounds of the historic Royal Artillery Barracks. It is estimated that more than 104.000 spectators will watch the competitions. The three buildings comprise 3.800 seats divided between two partially enclosed ranges for the 25 and 10/50 m qualifying rounds and a fully enclosed finals range. Together they form a campus on the field. Their up to 107 m long facades refer to the structured length of the Royal Artillery Barracks building, but have their own contemporary architectural expression.

© J.L. Diehl

Guided by the high requirements from the client, the Olympic Delivery Authority, sustainability was a key factor in shaping the design. All materials will be reused or recycled. All three of the venues are fully mobile, every joint has been designed so it can be reassembled; and no composite materials or adhesives were used. In addition, the semitransparent facades on two of the three ranges reduce the need for artificial lighting and the ventilation is fully natural. The tensioning detail was achieved through an efficient configuration of modular steel components commonly used in temporary buildings market. The double-curvature geometry is a result of the optimal use of the membrane material.

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Olympic Shooting Venue / Magma Architecture © J.L. Diehl
Olympic Shooting Venue / Magma Architecture © J.L. Diehl
Olympic Shooting Venue / Magma Architecture © J.L. Diehl
Olympic Shooting Venue / Magma Architecture © J.L. Diehl
Olympic Shooting Venue / Magma Architecture © J.L. Diehl
Olympic Shooting Venue / Magma Architecture © J.L. Diehl
Olympic Shooting Venue / Magma Architecture © J.L. Diehl
Olympic Shooting Venue / Magma Architecture © J.L. Diehl
Olympic Shooting Venue / Magma Architecture © J.L. Diehl
Olympic Shooting Venue / Magma Architecture © J.L. Diehl
Olympic Shooting Venue / Magma Architecture © J.L. Diehl
Olympic Shooting Venue / Magma Architecture © J.L. Diehl
Olympic Shooting Venue / Magma Architecture © J.L. Diehl
Olympic Shooting Venue / Magma Architecture © J.L. Diehl
Olympic Shooting Venue / Magma Architecture © J.L. Diehl
Olympic Shooting Venue / Magma Architecture © J.L. Diehl
Olympic Shooting Venue / Magma Architecture © J.L. Diehl
Olympic Shooting Venue / Magma Architecture © J.L. Diehl
Olympic Shooting Venue / Magma Architecture © J.L. Diehl
Olympic Shooting Venue / Magma Architecture © J.L. Diehl
Olympic Shooting Venue / Magma Architecture © J.L. Diehl
Olympic Shooting Venue / Magma Architecture © J.L. Diehl
Olympic Shooting Venue / Magma Architecture © J.L. Diehl
Olympic Shooting Venue / Magma Architecture © J.L. Diehl
Olympic Shooting Venue / Magma Architecture © J.L. Diehl
Olympic Shooting Venue / Magma Architecture © J.L. Diehl
Olympic Shooting Venue / Magma Architecture © J.L. Diehl
Olympic Shooting Venue / Magma Architecture © J.L. Diehl
Olympic Shooting Venue / Magma Architecture © Magma Architecture
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Do Architects Help? The Profession in International Development Event

Courtesy of Article 25

Taking place June 19th at 7pm at RIBA in is the Do Architects Help? event which will examine the role that the UK built environment industry plays in overseas development. This London Festival of Architecture discussion, sponsored by Dunbar & Boardman, and put on by Article 25, emphasizes that in a world that is becoming increasingly urban and populous, architects and other built environment professionals are well placed to use their specialist knowledge and skills to influence development policy and help communities better prepare for and recover from disasters. Despite this their expertise is largely lacking for mainstream international development practice. For more information on the event, please visit here.