Posts

Video: NA House by Sou Fujimoto Architects

Above is a video by Vincent Hecht, an architect and filmmaker in , which highlights the NA House by Sou Fujimoto Architects. The video is part of a new collection of architecture movies about Japanese architecture. Designed for a young couple in a quiet Tokyo neighborhood, the 914 square-foot transparent house contrasts the typical concrete block walls seen in most of Japan’s dense residential areas.

Video: KAIT (Kanagawa Institute of Technology) by Junya Ishigami + Associates

Click here to view the embedded video.

Above is a video by , an architect and filmmaker in France, which highlights the KAIT (Kanagawa Institute of Technology) by Junya Ishigami + Associates. The video is part of a new collection of architecture movies about Japanese architecture. With the relaxing and calming music in the background, you are able to place yourself in the amazing studio and workspace where students get to spend their days designing.

Sugamo Shinkin Bank / Tokiwadai branch by Emmanuelle Moureaux Architecture + Design (JP)

Sugamo Shinkin Bank / Tokiwadai branch by Emmanuelle Moureaux Architecture + Design

The French-born, Japan-based architect Emmanuelle Moureaux has realised this joyful three-storey Tokiwadai branch of a Japanese Sugamo Shinkin Bank. Featuring a distinctive white façade punctured by numerous, variously-sized windows and incorporating a reoccurring theme of leaf motifs, the building aims to provide the visiting clients with ‘a natural, rejuvenating feeling.’ More about the project:   ‘Sugamo Shinkin Bank is […]

BRUN / APOLLO Architects & Associates

© Masao Nishikawa

Architects: APOLLO Architects & Associates – Satoshi Kurosaki
Location: Koenji Minami Suginami, Tokyo,
Completion: December 2011
Site Area: 37.70 sqm
Total Floor Area: 93.44 sqm
Photographs: Masao Nishikawa

  

© Masao Nishikawa

This house was located in a residential area not far from a main downtown thoroughfare. The small southeastern corner plot, which had been subdivided from a larger piece of land, measured a slight 65sqm. The clients, a couple in their 30s who are keen architecture enthusiasts, requested a timeless design that would accommodate this small space.

Because passageways leading to other houses ran along the south-facing side of this deep plot with a narrow frontage, we installed windows in a random arrangement that would allow direct sunlight into the house. In contrast, privacy was a major concern for the side of the house facing the road, which we decided to enclose with wooden louvers. The contrast between the windows and the external walls clad in deep brown galvalume steel sheets created a sober and stately facade for this corner building.

© Masao Nishikawa

The pilotis area accommodates both the entrance and a small parking space, while the first floor houses the master bedroom and a storeroom-cum-gallery containing the husband’s cherished collection of bicycles. The family room on the second floor features a stairwell that makes use of the slanting wall, which emerged as a result of setback-line limit considerations. A steady and diffuse stream of light pours into the interior from the skylight. By boosting the ceiling height of this narrow, single-roomed space, we were able to emphasize the depth of the plot while concealing the narrowness of the frontage.

© Masao Nishikawa

A study room on the third floor makes clever use of the corridor facing the stairwell. The two hobby areas adjoining the study have a loft-like vibe that comes from the slanting walls, allowing the inhabitants to bask in the sunlight while remaining pleasantly absorbed in their activities.

section 01

Although the house is a “micro” urban residence whose total floor area measures only 93sqm, it consists of a single, interconnected habitat that takes the form of a vertically continuous one-room space. A simple view of its external facade gives few imaginative cues as to the surprisingly rich and varied interior space that lies within.

BRUN / APOLLO Architects & Associates © Masao Nishikawa
BRUN / APOLLO Architects & Associates © Masao Nishikawa
BRUN / APOLLO Architects & Associates © Masao Nishikawa
BRUN / APOLLO Architects & Associates © Masao Nishikawa
BRUN / APOLLO Architects & Associates © Masao Nishikawa
BRUN / APOLLO Architects & Associates © Masao Nishikawa
BRUN / APOLLO Architects & Associates © Masao Nishikawa
BRUN / APOLLO Architects & Associates © Masao Nishikawa
BRUN / APOLLO Architects & Associates © Masao Nishikawa
BRUN / APOLLO Architects & Associates © Masao Nishikawa
BRUN / APOLLO Architects & Associates © Masao Nishikawa
BRUN / APOLLO Architects & Associates © Masao Nishikawa
BRUN / APOLLO Architects & Associates © Masao Nishikawa
1st floor plan 1st floor plan
2nd floor plan 2nd floor plan
3rd floor plan 3rd floor plan
elevations elevations
section 01 section 01
section 02 section 02
section 03 section 03

Harvest Medical College / Shogo Iwata

Architects: Shogo Iwata
Location: , Japan
Site Area: 1,494.48 sqm
Total Floor Area: 3,802.50 sqm
Building Area: 794.82 sqm
Photographs: Yoshihisa Araki

 

 

Harvest Medical Welfare College
This medical welfare college is located in front of Himeji station. This building is considered as not just a medical welfare college but also an information center about medical and welfare for neighborhood. Therefore, the entrance lounge is used not only as student’s communication space but also people’s counseling space and the auditorium is also used as rehabilitation and eurhythmics lecture space.

Its design theme is “reflection of various color ”. The building uses six primary colors in interior, exterior, furniture and signs. The composition of these colors reflects embracing diversity that we regard as the primal concept of medical and welfare. The frontal facade consists of the composition of primal colors. The checker board patterned steel porous folded plates layered in front of it make the facade rich and ephemeral.

Havest Medical College / Shogo Iwata © Yoshihisa ArakiHavest Medical College / Shogo Iwata © Yoshihisa ArakiHavest Medical College / Shogo Iwata © Yoshihisa ArakiHavest Medical College / Shogo Iwata © Yoshihisa ArakiHavest Medical College / Shogo Iwata © Yoshihisa ArakiHavest Medical College / Shogo Iwata © Yoshihisa ArakiHavest Medical College / Shogo Iwata © Yoshihisa ArakiHavest Medical College / Shogo Iwata © Yoshihisa ArakiHavest Medical College / Shogo Iwata © Yoshihisa ArakiHavest Medical College / Shogo Iwata © Yoshihisa ArakiHavest Medical College / Shogo Iwata © Yoshihisa Araki1st floor plan 1st floor plan2nd floor plan 2nd floor plan3rd floor plan 3rd floor plan4th floor plan 4th floor plan5th floor plan 5th floor planelevation 01 elevation 01elevation 02 elevation 02sections sections

Pojagi House / MDS

Architects: MDS
Location: Yokohama-City, Kanagawa,
Project Team: Kiyotoshi Mori, Natsuko Kawamura 
Project Area: 102.68 sqm
Project Year: 2010
Photographs: Toshiyuki Yano

 

The term tsuzukima (literally “continuous gap”) refers to a space overlaid with traditional Japanese tatami (straw) mats. By shutting the sliding doors, these spaces can be used as small rooms. When these same doors are opened, tsuzukima become part of a single, wide-open space. This particular residential project expands on this concept, evolving the tsuzukima in a new direction.

At the beginning of the design process, our client (a professional designer) suggested that we use the traditional Korean pojagi patchwork cloth as a theme. We eventually decided to create a tsuzukima using pojagi fabrics that our client had designed and produced. The loosely defined spatial layout of the house was based around a series of colonnade-like walls built out of a series of square wooden pillars measuring 150mm across and movable pojagi distributed throughout a simple, two-dimensional space. The layout of these fabrics created a series of ever-changing scenes throughout the house.

The concrete portion of the foundation is used as a studio, while the part of the building elevated one level above the street that faces a lush park was used to build a two-layered living space. A high-ceilinged dining area with a loft space situated just above it occupies the central portion, resulting in a flexibly configured layout that encircles both spaces. Rows of wooden pillars that serve a structural function line the boundaries between these constituent spaces, while panel heating allows heat to be stored in these wooden components, helping to gently retain heat within the interior. The pojagi serve to block cold drafts that may enter the house through the windows, while also allowing heat energy inside the house to circulate freely by making optimum use of staircases and stairwells.

The exterior walls consist of the same modular structure that can be seen in the pojagi fabrics and wooden pillars in the interior of the house. All four sides of the building feature black walls (a traditional Japanese facade made from cedar boards that have been heat treated in order to prevent insect infestations) and glass panels that display a similar structure and configuration. The views looking out of the house also resulted in a slightly different ratio and placement of windows throughout the facade.

Pojagi House / MDS (18) © Toshiyuki YanoPojagi House / MDS (19) © Toshiyuki YanoPojagi House / MDS (21) © Toshiyuki YanoPojagi House / MDS (20) © Toshiyuki YanoPojagi House / MDS (1) © Toshiyuki YanoPojagi House / MDS (2) © Toshiyuki YanoPojagi House / MDS (3) © Toshiyuki YanoPojagi House / MDS (4) © Toshiyuki YanoPojagi House / MDS (5) © Toshiyuki YanoPojagi House / MDS (6) © Toshiyuki YanoPojagi House / MDS (7) © Toshiyuki YanoPojagi House / MDS (8) © Toshiyuki YanoPojagi House / MDS (9) © Toshiyuki YanoPojagi House / MDS (10) © Toshiyuki YanoPojagi House / MDS (11) © Toshiyuki YanoPojagi House / MDS (12) © Toshiyuki YanoPojagi House / MDS (13) © Toshiyuki YanoPojagi House / MDS (14) © Toshiyuki YanoPojagi House / MDS (15) © Toshiyuki YanoPojagi House / MDS (16) © Toshiyuki YanoPojagi House / MDS (17) © Toshiyuki YanoPlan PlanSection Section

Einosato Nursery School / Shogo Iwata

© Ogawa Shigeo

Architects: Shogo Iwata
Location: Hyogo,
Building Area: 781.82 sqm
Completion: 2011
Photographs: Ogawa Shigeo , Araki Yoshihisa

   

“A big house” to live in together
Einosato nursery school was built for 90 children in Hyogo, Japan. Outer wall of this wooden one-storied nursery school is made with black painted cedar clapboards. Its several rooms for children are arranged to surround playground. A one-sided stream roof put on these rooms brings not only the symbolic characteristic and spatial continuity as “a big house” but also intimacy for small children.

section 01

Einosato Nursery School / Shogo Iwata © Ogawa Shigeo
Einosato Nursery School / Shogo Iwata © Araki Yoshihisa
Einosato Nursery School / Shogo Iwata © Ogawa Shigeo
Einosato Nursery School / Shogo Iwata © Araki Yoshihisa
Einosato Nursery School / Shogo Iwata © Ogawa Shigeo
Einosato Nursery School / Shogo Iwata © Ogawa Shigeo
Einosato Nursery School / Shogo Iwata © Ogawa Shigeo
Einosato Nursery School / Shogo Iwata © Ogawa Shigeo
Einosato Nursery School / Shogo Iwata © Ogawa Shigeo
Einosato Nursery School / Shogo Iwata © Ogawa Shigeo
Einosato Nursery School / Shogo Iwata © Araki Yoshihisa
1st floor plan 1st floor plan
2nd floor plan 2nd floor plan
section 01 section 01
section 02 section 02
section 03 section 03
section 04 section 04

SANAA Supersizes Chair Design for America

“Armless Chair” (l) and “Armless Chair (Wide)” (r) by SANAA

The politics of the American figure–we’ll say form–inspires numerous reactions here at home: some (wrongly) argue for the preservation of the right to poor life decisions, while others indicate the larger systemic social issues at play, advocating for new or amended policies not skewed toward some misplaced (and uninformed) libertarian ethos or influenced by corporate profiteering. Clearly, it’s a difficult topic to broach, yet one which has so singularly defined how we and everyone else perceives the shape of America. Case in point, these two chair designs by SANAA, one of which was intended for the Japanese market and the other for American consumers. It shouldn’t be difficult to guess which is which!

As A Daily Dose writes, SANAA’s “Armless Chair” and “Armless Chair (Wide)” were displayed this past spring at the Canadian Center for Architecture’s (CCA) current exhibition, “Imperfect Health“, which explored problems of health and medicalization through the lens of architecture and urbanism. Manufactured for Maruni, the pair of chairs share the same design scheme, with the back of the seat formed by two splayed “bunny ears”, each of which supports the back of the sitter while alleviating pressure on the spine. Only that the Armless Chair (Wide) is exactly that, wide, the proportions of the original being stretched horizontally to accommodate the American “other”. Still, this iteration looks roomier and probably more comfortable, something that you can slink into or even sleep in. The same can’t be said for the Japanese model, which looks too narrow to not keep the sitter on edge.