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Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture

© Stéphane Groleau

Architects: Co Architecture
Location: Quebec, Canada
Project Area: 37,000 sqm
Project Year: 2011
Client: Glaxo Smith Kline
Photographs: Stéphane Groleau

© Stéphane Groleau

A company of influenza vaccines in Quebec City recently invited four architectural firms to participate in a contest to construct a highly distinctive administration building that would also be exemplary in energy efficiency. Our proposal based on both innovation and sustainable development, was chosen as the winner.

© Stéphane Groleau

The building site had poor soil quality and was practically void of vegetation. The recommended approach to the landscaping as to restore it to its original natural state. Promoting biodiversity and the replenishment of groundwater to ensure the growth of the native plants that were reintroduced, the finished landscape contributes not only to the quality of the interior spaces but to the reenergizing of the occupants as well.

© Stéphane Groleau

Similarly, the building with its organic silhouette has been placed here in symbiosis with the climate, much like an animal ingeniously adapted to its environment as a matter of survival. It faces the south, protected aesthetically from solar heat gains by a system of sunshades integrated into a fully-glazed, double-skinned envelope with translucent metal panels on the east and west sides.

On the north side, the building envelope is designed to conserve energy in the cold of winter. These techniques have been employed to provide comfortable, indoor environments lit abundantly by natural light which, their occupants have reported, has an invigorating effect.

© Stéphane Groleau

Full transparency on the south side permits the exposure of the wooden skeleton whose frames have been refined to express the warm, organic characteristic desired. Ecologically, this structure achieves carbon neutrality while contributing to the richness of the interior spaces. Based on bioclimatic principles, an energy efficient environment improves the quality of life of the workers.

The main work areas were placed on the north side to shield them from glare and fluctuations in solar radiation, and to provide an unobstructed outside view throughout the day. A radiant heating system provides warmth while at the same time, soundproofing the wooden decking on the lower level. Chilled beams and acoustic panels that diffuse the light make up a customized system that allows the richness of the structural to be seen without compromising the quality of the acoustics.

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Lining the south façade are the so-called “interactive spaces” and lounges where the occupants are encouraged to take their breaks and socialize in a comfortable and relaxing environment. Depending on their usage, the temperature in each of these spaces can be controlled through natural ventilation or by increasing direct solar radiation to create a rich, energizing luminosity which acts as a form of light therapy.

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The unanimous satisfaction expressed by the occupants of the building translates into increases in creativity, productivity and benefits for the company. The success of this project, therefore, has the potential to change attitudes in a way that the administrative sector can better contribute to the quality of the urban landscape, and especially, towards sustainable development.

Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
Administrative Building of Glaxo Smith Kline / Co Architecture © Stéphane Groleau
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Office Solvas / GRAUX & BAEYENS architecten

Architects: GRAUX & BAEYENS architecten
Location: ,
Project Area: 1,200 sqm
Project Year: 2012
Photographs: Luc Roymans

 

Office Solvas is a newly constructed office building in the center of Zomergem, Belgium, in the immediate vicinity of the church and adjacent square. Within this specific context the design challenge was to integrate a three-story building (with two office-floors and one level for apartments) on a lot between two buildings with a completely different typology. The left building is one story high with a flat roof, the right one has two floors and a pitched roof.

The first two office-floors were shifted horizontally. On the right side this created a passage to the underlying parking lot and provided a distance towards the neighbor on the left. This patio also brings daylight deep into the building. The upper story was shifted away from the street to fit the “gabarit” of the building on the right side. This way the two neighboring apartments were given a substantial terrace on the front overlooking the church.

The shifted lower levels were further enhanced with the insertion of two glass volumes. One volume accentuates the entrance hall, while the upper one creates a panoramic view of the square. The façade of both offices consists of concrete panels and a rhythm of wooden slats. These lamellae form a privacy filter without compromising daylight. They also provide a visually open fence for the patio facing the street. The apartments differentiate themselves from the underlying floors by a dark zinc finish. This materialization refers to the rhythm of the lamellae.

The materials of these exterior elements have also been applied throughout the interior. Between the concrete slabs of floor and ceiling a visually open plan was created with white desks and wooden volumes, woven between a grid of steel columns and black pillars. Suspended white ceilings delineate different zones and provide room for lighting and ventilation, while glass walls provide the necessary partition.

The steel columns were specifically composed of standard extrusions, reinforced with two flanking plates of flat steel. In this way, the column is provided with larger capacity, but it retains its slenderness and is given a certain refinement.

At the entrance hall filtered light is admitted through a wide open staircase of black steel steps and a glass floor.

Office Solvas / GRAUX & BAEYENS architecten (14) © Luc RoymansOffice Solvas / GRAUX & BAEYENS architecten (15) © Luc RoymansOffice Solvas / GRAUX & BAEYENS architecten (13) © Luc RoymansOffice Solvas / GRAUX & BAEYENS architecten (1) © Luc RoymansOffice Solvas / GRAUX & BAEYENS architecten (3) © Luc RoymansOffice Solvas / GRAUX & BAEYENS architecten (2) © Luc RoymansOffice Solvas / GRAUX & BAEYENS architecten (4) © Luc RoymansOffice Solvas / GRAUX & BAEYENS architecten (5) © Luc RoymansOffice Solvas / GRAUX & BAEYENS architecten (6) © Luc RoymansOffice Solvas / GRAUX & BAEYENS architecten (7) © Luc RoymansOffice Solvas / GRAUX & BAEYENS architecten (8) © Luc RoymansOffice Solvas / GRAUX & BAEYENS architecten (9) © Luc RoymansOffice Solvas / GRAUX & BAEYENS architecten (10) © Luc RoymansOffice Solvas / GRAUX & BAEYENS architecten (11) © Luc RoymansOffice Solvas / GRAUX & BAEYENS architecten (12) © Luc RoymansOffice Solvas / GRAUX & BAEYENS architecten (16) © Luc RoymansPlan (1) PlanPlan (2) PlanPlan (3) PlanSection (1) SectionSection (2) Section

Ministry of Justice / Architects of Invention

© Nakanin Mamasakhlisi photo lab

Architects: Architects of Invention
Location: K. GamsakhurdiaSqu, ,
Design Team: Niko Japaridze, Gogiko Sakvarelidze, Dato Canava, Eka Kankava, Eka Rekhviashvili, Viliana Guliashvili, Nika Maisuradze, David Dolidze, Soso Eliava, PM Devi Kituashvili
Building area: 3,638 sqm
Budget: $2 million
Completed date: April 2012
Client: Ministry of Justice Georgia
Photographer: Nakanin Mamasakhlisi photo lab

   

© Nakanin Mamasakhlisi photo lab

Public services united for new concept institution
Continuing their trend for ambitious new government buildings, Architects of Invention have designed the Ministry of Justice in Ozurgeti, which was opened by President of Georgia Mikheil Saakashvili in April 2012. Architects of Invention were invited to submit a proposal by Georgia’s House of Justice. The brief included a design for a 1500m2 building to house 95 members of staff and a flow of 400 users a day, to serve Ozurgeti’s population of 21,000. Construction began in September 2011.

© Nakanin Mamasakhlisi photo lab

The Ministry building brings together a number of services – the Civil Registry Agency, National Agency of Public Registry, National Archives of Georgia, National Bureau of Enforcement and Notary Chamber – under one roof, creating a new blueprint for a government building. Inspired by a classical Greek form, the Ministry is fronted with regular columns, but, rather than a rendered façade, the columns support a canopy beneath which are two independent and contrasting glass volumes.

© Nakanin Mamasakhlisi photo lab

The volumes are detached from the canopy, thus emphasizing their temporary nature: any form can be placed underneath this roof, the key being to reveal two forms and the air in between them. The size of the Public Hall defines the first volume, which is rectangular and also contains office space. The second volume is oval and set apart from the rectangular block to accommodate a covered entrance and public walkway between the buildings, connecting the square to one of Ozurgeti’s major boulevards.

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Each form is double-storied and linked by an underground corridor. The exteriors and interiors are uniform white, adding to a sense of luminosity. The choice of 100% transparent low emission glass creates brightness inside the building. This building is contextual, with a clear relationship to the city and its surroundings. It invites public interaction and its presence modernises the square with its existing residential buildings, a former local art museum and a 400-seat theatre.

The Ministry of Justice is the second of three buildings to be completed by Architects of Invention in 2012. The Prosecutor’s Office in Georgia’s capital Tbilisi completed in February 2012 and the next building to be completed (September 2012) is the Ministry of Justice in Lazika, on the coast of the Black Sea. The city will become a marine, economic and commercial centre in Georgia. Architects of Invention have also been invited to submit proposals for the city’s town planning.

Ministry of Justice / Architects of Invention © Nakanin Mamasakhlisi photo lab
Ministry of Justice / Architects of Invention © Nakanin Mamasakhlisi photo lab
Ministry of Justice / Architects of Invention © Nakanin Mamasakhlisi photo lab
Ministry of Justice / Architects of Invention © Nakanin Mamasakhlisi photo lab
Ministry of Justice / Architects of Invention © Nakanin Mamasakhlisi photo lab
Ministry of Justice / Architects of Invention © Nakanin Mamasakhlisi photo lab
Ministry of Justice / Architects of Invention © Nakanin Mamasakhlisi photo lab
Ministry of Justice / Architects of Invention © Nakanin Mamasakhlisi photo lab
Ministry of Justice / Architects of Invention © Nakanin Mamasakhlisi photo lab
Ministry of Justice / Architects of Invention © Nakanin Mamasakhlisi photo lab
Ministry of Justice / Architects of Invention © Nakanin Mamasakhlisi photo lab
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Jansen Campus / Davide Macullo Architects

Architects: Davide Macullo Architects
Location: , SG, Switzerland
Client: Jansen AG
Principal: Davide Macullo
Project architect: Lorenza Tallarini
Design collaborators: Ah Lom Kim; Aileen Forbes-Munnelly; Karen Abernethy; Michele Alberio; Samuela Pfund; Alias Spa – Grumello del Monte I; Sara SA – Tenero TI; Stoll Giroflex – Lenzburg AG
Completion: May 2012
Total floor area: 3,300 sqm
Photographs: Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects

   

Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects

Background
The new Jansen Campus lies in the village of Oberriet, in the Rhine valley, one of the most industrialised areas of Switzerland. The company is currently run by a dynamic young team and though in existence for almost a hundred years, the last ten years have seen a particularly rapid expansion into international markets. The motivation behind the construction of the new building has been to create a space that would have a positive and productive effect on the creativity of the executives, researchers and employees of the company.

Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects

Throughout all the phases of design and construction, there has been an underlying and continuous concern in investing in human. This innovative social approach has been consistently supported throughout the project by the company and the challenge to deliver such a building has been met with great satisfaction by all involved. The project is the result of a genuine collaboration between Jansen and the design team. Having worked with architects for many years, developing and tailoring solutions, the clients have a great appreciation of architecture and were keen to apply their experience and expertise to finding solutions for their new building.

Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects

The new building was preceded by sort of mini urbanisation of the Jansen site, resulting from the necessary expansion of existing industrial structures and which then allowed for the creation of spaces on a human scale within the existing fabric. This has led to the formation of a series of spaces that evoke the atmosphere of public squares. Given the site’s potential for further development, the project has adopted the name ‘CAMPUS- Campus für Innovation und Technik’ – evoking a place of production, sharing, learning and research.

The project began three years ago with a concept design and has become a reality that has taken on regional importance, representative of genuine Swiss quality, design, craftsmanship, construction and economy. Jansen is committed to the sustainable management of its production and logistics and in keeping with the company’s ethic and technical excellence in this field, the building meets the exacting Minergie standards, with efficient energy use and the reduction of environmental pollution ensuring the enhanced quality of life for the users of the building and a competitiveness in maintenance costs. The building for example uses ground water for the heating and cooling and runs on a heat recovery system, drawing attention to the company’s experience in energy efficiency and production of photovoltaic elements.

Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects

Jansen Campus- A Bridge Between The DNA Of a Place And Its Future
The site for the construction of the new Jansen Campus lies at the north end of the industrial complex and is bordered by the small scaled residential expansion of the village. This particular site allows the new building to insert itself as the link between two different urban scales- at once acting as the face of the industrial area while also reducing to the scale of the village. This reduction in scale has been achieved by fragmenting the mass of the building into four.

Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects

Oberriet, like many other built landscapes in Switzerland, is typified by a multitude of different sized inclined planes, sloping in different directions, that manage to achieve a remarkable visual and spatial balance. It is the sloping roofs and their game of shadows and reflections throughout the day that characterise the built space of this place. In fact, at a perceptive level, the facades of the buildings lose their importance, assuming the supportive roles of these great inclined plans. The new geometry of the Jansen Campus has been generated by this complexity of the ‘games of planes’.

Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects

The internal landscape is articulated as a fluid space, almost as if it were formed by an extension of the urban streets of the village, a system of solids and voids expanding in all directions. The apparent mass of the new building is dematerialised internally, flooded with natural light teeming through the generous openings and the grand slicing overhangs that project the users out to the landscape.

Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects

The new Jansen Campus is also characterised by research, carried out during the design, on innovative materials and technological solutions- some used for the first time in construction. For example the semi-structural facade, produced by Jansen, is a new system produced in such a way as to guarantee a continuity of the reflective, glazed and transparent elements of the building, without the need for external support mechanisms.

Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects

In order to build the sloping roofs of the building, a system of adding fibres to the concrete casting was developed. By doing this, this guaranteed that the poured cement would adhere to the metal reinforcements. An innovative radiant system (TABS), partly produced by Jansen, based on thermal mass principles, has also been integrated into the structure; heating and cooling circuits have been installed directly into the concrete structure forming the floors and ceilings, ensuring the quality conditioning of all spaces.

Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects

The facade is clad in a dark pre-patinated perforated Rheinzink mesh. This particular finish gives the material a colouring that evokes the density of the tones of the wooden buildings of the surrounding area. Used for the first time as an external cladding, this shimmers with reflections and shadows, changing throughout the day. The modular design and the tight stretched mesh play a role in the scale of the building and make it interesting and pleasurable for approaching visitors. The Jansen Campus, both internally and externally was almost entirely built using resources available within a few kilometres of the site. This fact highlights the entrepreneurial strength of the region, the commitment to sustainability principles and the focus of efforts towards effective energy savings.

Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects

Internal Fuctions
In order to allow for the fluid flow of daily working life, spaces intended for collective use have been placed adjacent to the main lifts and stair while the more intimate working spaces lie further along from this circulation. The structural functions of the building are assumed by the perimeter walls of the triangles, thus allowing for a free plan internally with a high degree of flexibility and possibility for future division. Currently the spaces are organised about a three-dimensional grid that corresponds to the company’s functional structure.

Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects

The public functions are distributed from a reception zone on the ground floor. Rooms for meetings, business lunches and a restaurant all lead off this area. Also on the ground floor, beside the reception is an office known as ‘Mission Control’ representing the operational heart of the company and acts almost like the stock market floor, where all information regarding the operations of the company is processed here in real time. On the first floor there is a space named “Kreativbereich”, a workplace and informal meeting space open to all, much appreciated by the employees, a teaching room with foyer and other meeting rooms.

Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects

An open plan office for the communications section is located on the second floor and on the third is the boardroom with a panoramic terrace. Individual offices and more intimate working spaces requiring more privacy are distributed along a spiral, with their area increasing as the spiral rises. The northern-most triangular block houses the operations wing of the company across two floors and on the upper floors are the offices of the directors responsible for this sector. The south triangle houses quality control and the executives responsible on the second floor.

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In the basement there are ca. 1000sqm reserved for archives, mechanical rooms and technological systems. Despite its apparent sophistication, the atmosphere of the internal landscape reflects the principle of reducing details to a minimum. The constructive elements are therefore always explicit and follow the rationale and economy of the site and the project, giving the space a technical, industrial atmosphere.

The Completion of a Vision
Alongside the building itself, the ‘architecture’, particular care has been taken in the landscape design and in the choice of both furniture and art works to complete the spaces. The landscape design involved the planting of 80 trees of 35 different species that have existed in the Rhine valley for at least the last 200 years and as such it takes on a didactic role in explaining the region’s landscape.

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Contrary to the traditional art investment for a work created in-situ, and thereby explicitly connected to the building, it was preferred, within the same economic parameters to take a more ‘dynamic’ route. As such, the art works selected reflect the intention of interacting with the complexity of our contemporary world and contains pieces by young, internationally established, contemporary artists.

Just as in the attention given to every detail in construction, the same precision and care went into the choice of furniture and the lighting and technical elements in the building. It was decided that the furniture pieces would be products of the recent generation of designers, the result of a particular technological research, be of resistant and durable materials and reflect the philosophy of Jansen.

Jansen Campus / Davide Macullo Architects Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects
Jansen Campus / Davide Macullo Architects Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects
Jansen Campus / Davide Macullo Architects Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects
Jansen Campus / Davide Macullo Architects Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects
Jansen Campus / Davide Macullo Architects Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects
Jansen Campus / Davide Macullo Architects Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects
Jansen Campus / Davide Macullo Architects Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects
Jansen Campus / Davide Macullo Architects Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects
Jansen Campus / Davide Macullo Architects Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects
Jansen Campus / Davide Macullo Architects Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects
Jansen Campus / Davide Macullo Architects Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects
Jansen Campus / Davide Macullo Architects Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects
Jansen Campus / Davide Macullo Architects Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects
Jansen Campus / Davide Macullo Architects Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects
Jansen Campus / Davide Macullo Architects Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects
Jansen Campus / Davide Macullo Architects Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects
Jansen Campus / Davide Macullo Architects Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects
Jansen Campus / Davide Macullo Architects Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects
Jansen Campus / Davide Macullo Architects Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects
Jansen Campus / Davide Macullo Architects Courtesy of Davide Macullo Architects
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