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The Twins Science Park / 24H architecture

© Boris Zeisser

Architects: 24H architecture
Location: Sciencepark, ,
Project Team: Maartje Lammers, Boris Zeisser
Project Area: 14,000 sqm
Project Year: 2012
Client: Heddes Vastgoed
Photographs: Boris Zeisser

Within in de urban scheme of KCAP – Kees Christiaanse for the Science Park in Amsterdam, 24H>architecture was commissioned to make a proposal for one of the five housing projects, called ‘the Twins’. The location is situated between the Oosterringdike and the Caroline Mac Gillavrylaan.

© Boris Zeisser

24H’s proposal for the two apartment blocks, 18 and 15 storeys high, house a total of 87 dwellings. Two L shaped volumes slide under each other and are connected through a plinth containing housing and parking. The smaller west tower sits flush upon the east tower, opening up views to and creating the entrance from the dike and the street, as well as providing access to the parking. The east tower is standing on the ground and allows direct access to the houses on street level. Its main entrance and lobby establish a visual connection between the dike and the Caroline Mac Gillavrylaan, with vertical circulation located in the middle.

© Boris Zeisser

The facade is made up of a fine grid of slate and glass. Variations in colour from brown to grey as the towers rise connect the building to the elements: brown at the bottom, where the towers root up from the ground; and grey towards the top. The windows have irregular shapes. Throughout the process these windows were named after the mathematical toy, the Tetris cube. Views are magnificent also lying in bed or sitting on your sofa.

Plan

The skin tapers outwards at specific parts of the towers to create a noise barrier due to the nearby railway.

The Twins Science Park / 24H architecture (17) © Boris Zeisser
The Twins Science Park / 24H architecture (25) © Boris Zeisser
The Twins Science Park / 24H architecture (1) © Boris Zeisser
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The Twins Science Park / 24H architecture (8) © Boris Zeisser
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The Twins Science Park / 24H architecture (10) © Boris Zeisser
The Twins Science Park / 24H architecture (11) © Boris Zeisser
The Twins Science Park / 24H architecture (12) © Boris Zeisser
The Twins Science Park / 24H architecture (13) © Boris Zeisser
The Twins Science Park / 24H architecture (14) © Boris Zeisser
The Twins Science Park / 24H architecture (15) © Boris Zeisser
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The Twins Science Park / 24H architecture (22) © Boris Zeisser
The Twins Science Park / 24H architecture (23) © Boris Zeisser
The Twins Science Park / 24H architecture (24) © Boris Zeisser
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Eco Modern Flats / Modus Studio

Architects: Modus Studio
Location: , Arkansas, USA
Completion: 2011
Thermal Area: 62,400 SF
Building: $3,810,900 | $61 per SF
Architectural Team: Chris M. Baribeau, AIA [principal architect], Austin Chatelain, Assoc. AIA [project manager], Josh Siebert, Assoc. AIA, Jason Wright, Assoc. AIA, Chris M. Lankford, David McElyea, Assoc. AIA.
Structural Engineer: MyersBeatty Engineers
Photographs: Timothy Hursley, Adaptive Creative 

  

 

Project Summary.
Eco Modern Flats is a sustainable modern design renovation—the first LEED for Homes Multifamily Platinum project in the state of Arkansas—of an existing 96-unit apartment complex.The sociallyresponsible success of this project is summarized by making sustainable, attainable. The four existing apartment buildings, constructed between 1968 and 1972, have great bones of precast concrete and split face block, but were drastically lacking in thermal comfort, air quality and aesthetic appeal. The stasis of the existing apartments combined with the residual disconnects from the inherent site amenities required our thoughtful intervention of low-tech and affordable design solutions. The communicative and decidedly simple design has reinvented this property as a sustainable living community ideally located adjacent to the University of Arkansas, Dickson Street Entertainment District and Downtown Fayetteville.

The renovation completely overhauled the living systems of each unit and transformed the entire complex’s visual presence in the community.The existing topography and forgotten residual spaces between the buildings were utilized to create various courtyard spaces as well as public and private terraces, patios, and rooftop decks. The design provides new connections to the re-integrated and re-imagined landscape of the site, elevating the greater community and local tenant experience by capturing the demographic seeking modern design and sustainable living…previously unattainable in Northwest Arkansas.

This project rediscovers spaces in a palette of steel and cedar to breathe new life into an otherwise banal layered construction system. The design had to perform both tectonically and compositionally in a very simple way to meet the demands of budget and schedule. A kit of parts panel system was developed, combining the modern durability of steel with the natural warmth of cedar to reshape and reform the juxtaposition of the existing structures. Ground-based cedar panels carve out new terrace spaces. New balconies extend beyond the wraparound walkways at the second floor, simultaneously extending outdoor space while covering patios below. New cantilevered stairs span from the third floor walkways to roof, allowing people to access previously unobtainable views of the university, city and mountains. The new composition provides a playful backdrop for the complex and delivers unique character and spatial options for various units around the property.

The unit interiors were refined as gallery-like spaces, blank canvases upon which people can insert their lives within the efficient 600sf one bedroom apartments. Quality millwork, concrete countertops and polished concrete floors were used to provide durable, clean, and sustainable finishes which compliment a carefully introduced color palette. A central multivalent wall articulates space while simultaneously serving the kitchen, living and bedroom spaces with storage, light and a 180° rotating TV module.

Originally, each unit was exactly the same: a closed-in box chopped into tiny rooms with little or no defined outdoor space. Within the confines of the original building footprint, the new interiors feel more spacious due to the introduction of larger windows, sliding patio doors, open living spaces with built-in, multifunctional storage and work spaces. Each unit now has an outdoor living space—a terrace, a walled patio, a balcony, or a large rooftop terrace—carved from existing unused or underutilized space.

Each unit also incorporates efficient LED and fluorescent lighting fixtures along with retrofitted dual-flush toilets and reused lavatories. No-VOC paints, soybean-based insulation, and new insulating operable windows have greatly increased indoor environmental quality. Energy star appliances, high efficiency mini-split heating/cooling units, and a solar hot water system that provides 75% of the heated water for each building have dramatically reduced energy consumption/carbon emissions.

• low-tech solutions
• green screen
• transformer/tv
• reused porcelain
• dual flush toilets
• tile showers
• rainwater harvesting cisterns
• raingarden
• native plantings
• solar hot water
• biobased insulation
• new windows
• color palette
• custom furniture
• recycling stations
• graphic design and marketing
• signage
Project Blurb.
Eco Modern Flats is a sustainable modern design renovation—the first LEED for Homes Multifamily Platinum project in the state of Arkansas—of an existing 96-unit apartment complex.
Project Statement (250 words).

This project rediscovers spaces in a palette of steel and cedar to breathe new life into an otherwise banal, layered construction system.The four existing apartment buildings, constructed between 1968-1972, have great bones of precast concrete and split face block but were drastically lacking in thermal, environmental, and aesthetic qualities. The entire complex’s visual presence has been transformed.

The stasis of the existing apartment units and the residual disconnect of the buildings from the inherent site amenities required architecture that performs tectonically and compositionally. By creating elegant armatures combining smart and low-tech sustainable design solutionswe overhauled the living systems of each unit and heightened the livable experience. The existing topography and forgotten residual spaces between the buildings were optimized into various courtyard spaces as well as public and private terraces, patios, and rooftop decks. Each of these spaces is delineated by a kit-of-parts panel system combining the modern durability of steel with the natural warmth of cedar.The interiors were refined as blank canvases upon which people can insert their lives within the efficient 600 SF one bedroom apartments. Quality millwork, concrete countertops and polished concrete floors provide durable, clean, and sustainable finishes complimenting a thoughtfully freshcolor palette. A central multivalent wall articulates space while simultaneously serving the kitchen, living and bedroom spaces with storage, light and a 180° rotating TV module.

The communicative and decidedly simple design has reinvented this place as a sustainable living community ideally located adjacent to the University of Arkansas, Dickson Street Entertainment District and Downtown Fayetteville.

Eco Modern Flats / Modus Studio © Timothy HursleyEco Modern Flats / Modus Studio © Timothy HursleyEco Modern Flats / Modus Studio © Adaptive creativeEco Modern Flats / Modus Studio © Adaptive creativeEco Modern Flats / Modus Studio © Adaptive creativeEco Modern Flats / Modus Studio © Adaptive creativeEco Modern Flats / Modus Studio © Adaptive creativeEco Modern Flats / Modus Studio © Timothy HursleyEco Modern Flats / Modus Studio © Timothy HursleyEco Modern Flats / Modus Studio © Timothy HursleyEco Modern Flats / Modus Studio © Timothy HursleyEco Modern Flats / Modus Studio © Timothy HursleyEco Modern Flats / Modus Studio © Timothy HursleyEco Modern Flats / Modus Studio © Timothy Hursleyaxonometric axonometricdiagram 01 diagram 01diagram 02 diagram 02ground floor plan ground floor plan

10 Logements Paris / RMDM Architectes

Architects: RMDM Architectes 
Location: 5,9 Impasse Dupuy, , France
Project Team: Alexandre de Muizon, Philippe Maillols, Eric Dolent
Project Area: 780 sqm
Project Year: 2012
Photographs: Courtesy of RMDM Architectes

 

Architectural Response

Designed in a U-shape around patios and freeing up a green space along the edge of the street, each plot offers largely glazed double-oriented apartments that open onto the outside to get maximum benefit from natural light.

The living rooms overlook the public spaces and contribute to the vitality of urban life.

The buildings are clad with coated aluminum cassette panel cladding in three shades from grey to white. Plain panels on the standard sections alternate with perforated panels on the railings and the hinged shutters animate the façade according to the degree of opening, whilst also providing protection from the summer sun and maintaining the residents’ privacy.

The gable received special attention and was afforded the same treatment as the façade due to its importance in the building’s perception and its impact on the landscape of the cul-de-sac.

Organisation

On the first floor is a three-bedroom (T4) apartment with regulation-compliant disabled access, and suitably equipped from the outset. This apartment also benefits from a private small courtyard.

The floors above house a studio (T1) and two-bedroom (T3) apartment on either side of a central staircase. The latter enjoys natural lighting.

The main building overlooking the street is built on a basement where the cellars that every apartment boasts can be found, along with the storeroom, the meter room, and the boiler room.

The recycling room is directly accessible from the outside, near to the entrance hall. The bike room is accessible from the hall.

10 Logements Paris / RMDM Architectes (3) Courtesy of RMDM Architectes10 Logements Paris / RMDM Architectes (2) Courtesy of RMDM Architectes10 Logements Paris / RMDM Architectes (1) Courtesy of RMDM Architectes10 Logements Paris / RMDM Architectes (4) Courtesy of RMDM Architectes10 Logements Paris / RMDM Architectes (5) Courtesy of RMDM Architectes10 Logements Paris / RMDM Architectes (6) Courtesy of RMDM Architectes10 Logements Paris / RMDM Architectes (7) Courtesy of RMDM Architectes10 Logements Paris / RMDM Architectes (8) Courtesy of RMDM Architectes10 Logements Paris / RMDM Architectes (9) Courtesy of RMDM Architectes10 Logements Paris / RMDM Architectes (10) Courtesy of RMDM Architectes10 Logements Paris / RMDM Architectes (11) Courtesy of RMDM Architectes10 Logements Paris / RMDM Architectes (12) Courtesy of RMDM Architectes10 Logements Paris / RMDM Architectes (13) Courtesy of RMDM ArchitectesPlan PlanPlan (2) Plan

Logements Rue Riquet / François Noël Architectes

Architects: François Noël Architectes
Location: Rue Riquet, , France
Project Area: 4,925 sqm
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Martin Argyroglo

 

Conceived for Paris Habitat – OPH, the 45-apartment housing project on rue Riquet in the 19th arrondissement in Paris is a follow-up to an award obtained in 2007. The 8-story street-side building is located on a parcel in the midst of a densely populated neighborhood, very close to avenue de Flandre.

Its slender lines and interlocked volumes suggest tasteful modern architecture, in-keeping with the scale of the neighborhood. It replaces an old gas station, thus remodeling the block. The architecture of the neighborhood as a whole is characterized by high-rise buildings typical of 1970s housing projects.

The project, a very compact one so as to address energy restraint considerations, nevertheless plays the openness card, with its longitudinal perspectives looking out on rue Riquet as well as with its widely unobstructed southward view. Numerous exterior surfaces were indeed created, a true privilege for housing projects located within Paris city limits.

Urban consistency

Restructuring urban networks by being in-keeping with the street’s architecture while relying on the depth of the block, this is what guided our approach.

The front side, rue Riquet

The style of the front side enables the juxtaposition of five volumes with different heights to be legible and consistent, when they could have made the building fragmented and incoherent.

The two white volumes are crowned by a gray and pink crest, from which emerge two bright red flat plates. Three yellow balconies dissociate as well as they couple the two white volumes, while the ground floor is adorned by stone cladding, qualifying the passer-by’s walk.

The back side

Composed and conceived in a rather different style, the southward side offers vertical shapes, soaring up towards the sky as though trying to escape from the somewhat confined core of this block. The dynamics of shapes jutting forward and standing back enable the emergence of three juxtaposed compositions, conversing among themselves, through the tension exerted by balconies of diverse shapes, colors, positions : sometimes clumped together, sometimes alternating, sometimes out of line, they play with charcoal gray, yellow, pink, white, giving rhythm and pace to the highly dynamic overall composition.

The building offers only double-oriented or corner apartments. A clear and distant view is offered to many tenants. Each apartment enjoys a balcony, a terrace or a loggia. These different exterior surfaces contribute to the quality of life the inhabitants are offered, with a view on the central garden, on distant horizons, on the surrounding buildings, on the Parisian roofs or on the perspective looking out on the urban regeneration zone of Pajol.

Logements Rue Riquet  / François Noël Architectes (14) © Martin ArgyrogloLogements Rue Riquet  / François Noël Architectes (1) © Martin ArgyrogloLogements Rue Riquet  / François Noël Architectes (2) © Martin ArgyrogloLogements Rue Riquet  / François Noël Architectes (3) © Martin ArgyrogloLogements Rue Riquet  / François Noël Architectes (4) © Martin ArgyrogloLogements Rue Riquet  / François Noël Architectes (5) © Martin ArgyrogloLogements Rue Riquet  / François Noël Architectes (6) © Martin ArgyrogloLogements Rue Riquet  / François Noël Architectes (7) © Martin ArgyrogloLogements Rue Riquet  / François Noël Architectes (8) © Martin ArgyrogloLogements Rue Riquet  / François Noël Architectes (9) © Martin ArgyrogloLogements Rue Riquet  / François Noël Architectes (10) © Martin ArgyrogloLogements Rue Riquet  / François Noël Architectes (11) © Martin ArgyrogloLogements Rue Riquet  / François Noël Architectes (12) © Martin ArgyrogloLogements Rue Riquet  / François Noël Architectes (13) © Martin ArgyrogloLogements Rue Riquet  / François Noël Architectes (15) © Martin ArgyrogloLogements Rue Riquet  / François Noël Architectes (16) © Martin ArgyrogloPlan (1) PlanPlan (2) PlanPlan (3) PlanPlan (4) PlanPlan (5) PlanElevation ElevationSection Section

Via Verde Officially Opens

© Phipps, Rose, Dattner, Grimshaw

Via Verde, Grimshaw Architects and Dattner Architects‘ sustainable housing development for the South Bronx, is officially open. At the ribbon cutting ceremony in front of 700 Brook Avenue and East 156th Street, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, along with the leaders of the Department of Housing and Urban Development, largely praised the team’s commitment to revitalize a once blighted South Bronx neighborhood.  ”No one would have predicted that today there would one day be one of the most innovative, exciting, environmentally sustainable affordable housing developments in the nation – if not the world. The change that has swept through the South Bronx in the last decade challenges the very notions of what is and isn’t possible in urban revival. And investment in high-quality affordable housing – made possible by partnerships like the one behind Via Verde – has been the catalyst,” explained the Mayor.  Located on a formerly contaminated industrial site, the eco-friendly housing development will provide hundreds with a healthy haven to enjoy fresh air and sunlight, natural food production, and outdoor play.

More about Via Verde’s opening after the break. 

The subsidized complex developed as part of Mayor Bloomberg’s New Housing Marketplace Plan with the intention to finance over 160,000 units of affordable housing by the close of Fiscal Year 2014.  After winning a competition organized by the Commissioner of the city’s Department of Housing Preservation and Development, Jonathan Rose and Phipps Houses Group teamed with Grimshaw Architects and Dattner Architects to bring New York City its first juried design competition proposal for affordable and sustainable housing.

“Via Verde is an intensively green, energy-efficient building, but it’s also a sustainable community that focuses on the quality of life and health of the families who will live here,” said Jonathan F.P. Rose, President of Jonathan Rose Companies. “To create vibrant, dense cities, we need models that integrate housing and health, food and family, security and sociability, reflection and restoration as integrated systems. Via Verde demonstrates that such integration is possible.”

As we reported earlier, Via Verde includes a 20-story tower at the north end of the site, six-to-12 story mid-rise buildings in the middle, and three-to-four story townhouses to the south that wrap a series of courtyards.  To date, all 151 low-income units are fully leased; and, 56 of the 71 co-op units have been sold.  All of the units in Via Verde were offered to the public via a lottery: for the 151 rental apartments there were 7,000 applications.

The project was constructed using 20%recycled materials with more than 20% of total building materials having been manufactured locally, minimizing transportation energy and supporting the local economy. In addition, more than 80% of the construction and demolition waste was recycled.

“Via Verde’s mandate for healthy living in affordable housing inspires not only a place to live, but a way to think…We sincerely hope the efforts put forward will enrich the lives of its residents, the community, and the future of affordable housing,” said Virginia Little LEED AP, Architect, Grimshaw.

Via Verde is not about layering a project with sustainable systems and approaches.  It is about providing a carefully designed and strategically constructed backdrop that will allow for a healthy lifestyle for all of its residents.  Such an act of architects, developers and City officials truly caring about the impacts of design and the environment will become an example for future housing developments around the City and across the country.

 

Eden Bio / Edouard François

Courtesy of Edouard François

Architects: Edouard François
Location: Paris, 
Project Area: 7,700 sqm
Project Year: 2009
Photographs: Courtesy of Edouard François

Eden Bio was a study of the densification of a typical suburban block on the east side of Paris.
Three ideas guided the project.

Courtesy of Edouard François

The first idea was to respect the surroundings and its history “à la Doisneau”. There were pre-existing buildings, full of life and devoid of pretension, some low, others tall. Long and narrow alleyways that are remnant of the area’s agricultural history interrupt the street alignment and spatially define the plot, while vegetation-filled corridors lead the eye into the sun-filled core of the block.

Courtesy of Edouard François

The program quickly became clear:  to avoid building directly on street alignments, to maintain the disparate suburban alignments, and to respect the alleys as connections that serve the whole complex. A long, low building takes shape in the core of the block, covered densely with plants.  Surrounding it, small townhouses are adorned with materials typically found in the middle of city blocks: unfinished wood, cinder blocks, mechanical tiles, zinc, and raw concrete. Eden Bio is made of these disparate materials without neglecting the presence of nature.

The second idea was that of access. In the interior of the block you will not find an upper class corridor but rather individual entrances that open directly to the outside as expressions of individuality. Easy to achieve for small houses, this idea guided the layout of the central building. External straight staircases rise, breaking free from the planted facades to serve two dwellings on each level.  Each apartment has windows on opposite sides of the building.  This idea was used for each apartment in the complex.

Courtesy of Edouard François

The third idea of the project was to allow nature to inhabit the recesses of this “village-like” composition. It is not designed as a garden but rather as an abandoned landscape that is colonized by plants, scattered into all its many crevasses. To do this, the original soil of the reclaimed land was replaced by a deep organic soil, Demeter certified. A single wind-blown seed that lands on this exceptional soil can flourish easily. Three years after the building was completed on a ground void of deliberate planting, trees and plants more than two meters tall can be found alongside butterfly bushes. Only the wisteria that invade the scaffold structure of the wooden staircases were intentionally planted. A few inches tall at planting, they rise more than six meters tall today.

Courtesy of Edouard François

Finally, to honor the agricultural past of the site, two greenhouses were built. They house the mailboxes and a room for strollers. They could be the smallest buildings ever built directly on a street front in Paris. Vines invade their interior volumes.

Courtesy of Edouard François

The operation was quickly named Eden Bio.
In 2009, the project was nominated the Silver T-square Award as well as the Mies van der Rohe award.

Model

Eden Bio (7) Courtesy of Edouard François
Eden Bio (1) Courtesy of Edouard François
Eden Bio (2) Courtesy of Edouard François
Eden Bio (3) Courtesy of Edouard François
Eden Bio (4) Courtesy of Edouard François
Eden Bio (5) Courtesy of Edouard François
Eden Bio (6) Courtesy of Edouard François
Eden Bio (8) Courtesy of Edouard François
Eden Bio (9) Courtesy of Edouard François
Eden Bio (10) Courtesy of Edouard François
Eden Bio (11) Courtesy of Edouard François
Eden Bio (12) Courtesy of Edouard François
Eden Bio (13) Courtesy of Edouard François
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71 council and private flats in Sète / CFA

© Cécile Septet

Architects: CFA – Colboc Franzen & associés
Location: Sète,
Project Team: Benjamin Colboc, Manuela Franzen, Arnaud Sachet
Project Area: 3,913 sqm
Project Year: 2011
Client: Pragma
Photographs: Cécile Septet

The building plot lies on the thin strip of land between the Étang de Thau and the Mediterranean Sea on the northern side of the old town, close to the commercial port and its huge industrial facilities. How should we evoke the site’s past and at the same time, through architecture, forge a modern identity for this entrance point to the town of Sète and its emerging neighbourhoods? How should we respond to the titanic scale of the port, with the sea as the horizon, while also maintaining the old town’s way of living?

© Cécile Septet

The project design is based on three blocks of flats set on a ground-floor base. The development comprises four distinct parts: 16 council flats in various configurations; 55 private two- and three-room flats; and shops and car parks to service all of the above. The base accommodates the shops and the car parks, whereas the blocks house the flats. The six-floor block of council flats provides a transition from the existing buildings around it and is therefore located at the centre of the project. The other two eight-floor blocks are thus free to demonstrate their autonomy. The block standing on the street corner marks the entrance to the old town while also looking out towards the commercial port facilities and future developments on the empty docklands. The block at the back is situated above parking spaces and gardens. It looks like a sculpted object in the middle of the ‘island’ and we therefore forget that regulations made it impossible to set the building against the existing party wall.

© Cécile Septet

These blocks also embody a principle of ‘Mediterranean architecture’ that allows for a lifestyle adapted to the local climate: outdoor living protected from intense heat. There are balconies running along the façade and these outdoor extensions allow occupants to walk around the outside of their flats. A galvanised steel screen protects it during very hot weather and also provides a nice amount of privacy. It follows the curve created by the varying widths of the balconies. It lends harmony to the three blocks and makes them easier to interpret. They become gigantic steel cocoons whose materials remind us of the maritime world, while their shape is reminiscent of a ship’s stem and the wind in the screen slats sounds like the jangling of masts in a port. The screen also allow occupants to make appropriate their balconies without disturbing their neighbours, and to create a ‘homely’ feel while also enjoying the view and life in the town centre.

Plan

Making good use of the various slopes, the car park creates a man-made topography in the centre of the block of land and harbours a landscape of gardens and parking spaces. The effect is like shelly limestone and it is punctuated with beds of broken rocks and characteristic regional plants. The ground is protected by a layer of bushes and small trees, which provide shade as well as establishing the requisite distance between the flats and people using the car parks.

71 council and private flats in Sète / CFA (Colboc Franzen & associés) (4) © Cécile Septet
71 council and private flats in Sète / CFA (Colboc Franzen & associés) (10) © Cécile Septet
71 council and private flats in Sète / CFA (Colboc Franzen & associés) (2) © Cécile Septet
71 council and private flats in Sète / CFA (Colboc Franzen & associés) (3) © Cécile Septet
71 council and private flats in Sète / CFA (Colboc Franzen & associés) (8) © Cécile Septet
71 council and private flats in Sète / CFA (Colboc Franzen & associés) (9) © Cécile Septet
71 council and private flats in Sète / CFA (Colboc Franzen & associés) (5) © Cécile Septet
71 council and private flats in Sète / CFA (Colboc Franzen & associés) (6) © Cécile Septet
71 council and private flats in Sète / CFA (Colboc Franzen & associés) (1) © Cécile Septet
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Cholula Student Housing / BNKR Arquitectura

BNKR Arquitectura designed a proposal for a 41 room student housing complex in a residential neighborhood in Cholula for the University of the Americas, which is currently growing and being absorbed into the urban area of Puebla, . The program is characterized as a dense agglomeration of cells with busy common areas that absorb student social life. More images and architects’ description after the break.

San Andrés Cholula is a peaceful, low-density residential zone located beside the traditional heart of San Pedro de Cholula. The University of the Americas, which acts as an urban attractor in Puebla, receives 8000 students yearly who are constantly searching for viable accommodation. Cholula is increasingly seeing developments that cater to this growing student population.

The design is complemented by a series of spaces and programs that assist the primary program. How to insert a dense residential student complex within a traditional suburban neighborhood without adversely affecting the peaceful character of the site? The main issue driving this design was therefore the need for an inward looking building that would not interfere with the local neighborhood yet would allow for a lively social scene at its heart.

The resulting scheme features a central patio surrounded by a linear three-level, four sided ring of housing that opens up onto it. Each housing cell in this ring includes all the amenities necessary for a compact residence: accommodations for sleeping, studying, and a basic kitchen and bathroom. The ground floor includes commercial rentable area, a cafeteria, and a private lounge. From the outside this mass appears closed and private, clad in a single, uninterrupted skin of perforated sleet plate

However, this private block lifts up one of its corners to allow direct access to the patio at ground level. The entire building must be understood as a cloister, with its focus on privacy and interior life, but is also opened up by this gesture, creating a building that is at once closed but welcoming; private but lively.

Architects: BNKR Arquitectura
Location: Cholula, Puebla, México
Design: BNKR Arquitectura / Esteban Suarez & Sebastian Suarez
Project Leader: Emelio Barjau & Angel Rivero
Project Team: Angel Rivero, Adrian Aguilar, Laura Fontaine, Diego Eumir, Paul Chavez, Mitl Gaxiol, Jaime Sol
Structural Design: DAE
Lighting: Noriegga Iluminadores
MEP: DCP
Area: 6,150m2
Start of Construction: Autumn 2012
Expected Completion: Winter 2013

Cholula Student Housing (4) Courtesy of BNKR ArquitecturaCholula Student Housing (5) Courtesy of BNKR ArquitecturaCholula Student Housing (6) Courtesy of BNKR ArquitecturaCholula Student Housing (7) Courtesy of BNKR ArquitecturaCholula Student Housing (8) context 01Cholula Student Housing (9) context 02Cholula Student Housing (10) location 01Cholula Student Housing (11) location 02Cholula Student Housing (12) plan 01Cholula Student Housing (13) plan 02Cholula Student Housing (14) plan 03Cholula Student Housing (15) plan 04Cholula Student Housing (16) plan 05Cholula Student Housing (17) elevation 01Cholula Student Housing (18) elevation 02Cholula Student Housing (19) elevation 03Cholula Student Housing (20) elevation 04Cholula Student Housing (21) section 01Cholula Student Housing (22) section 02Cholula Student Housing (23) section 03Cholula Student Housing (24) section 04Cholula Student Housing (25) form diagram 01Cholula Student Housing (26) form diagram 02Cholula Student Housing (27) form diagram 03Cholula Student Housing (28) form diagram 04Cholula Student Housing (29) form diagram 05Cholula Student Housing (3) program diagramCholula Student Housing (2) formal exploration diagrams 01Cholula Student Housing (1) formal exploration diagrams 02

House G-S / GRAUX & BAEYENS architecten

Architects: GRAUX & BAEYENS architecten
Location: Gent,
Completion: 2011
Area: 154 sqm + 25 sqm basement
Photographs: Luc Roymans 

 

House G-S in Ghent, Belgium
This 19th century corner house is located at the Muide waterfront area with a unique view on the old city harbor docks of Ghent, Belgium. The project started by stripping the dilapidated house of all excess. The essence was conserved by means of the façade, the stairwell and the roof truss, each of them serving as a rough coat to envelop the new spaces.

The rooms and living spaces are conceived as a stack of volumes, a white sculpture inserted in the existing casing. Several strategically located cutouts offer a variety of well-defined views. Inside the house, this approach brings contrast to each level, interplaying the original and new elements. Contrast is enhanced by the colours and textures of the selected material.

The living functions are inverted with respect to a conventional terraced house. This means that the bedrooms are located on the ground floor, the lounge can be found on the first floor and the kitchen, dining room occupy the top floor with an adjacent enclosed patio. The architects have aimed to create a symbiosis between contemporary residential living and the charm of a 19th century Belgian corner house.

House G-S / Graux & Baeyens Architecten © Luc RoymansHouse G-S / Graux & Baeyens Architecten © Luc RoymansHouse G-S / Graux & Baeyens Architecten © Luc RoymansHouse G-S / Graux & Baeyens Architecten © Luc RoymansHouse G-S / Graux & Baeyens Architecten © Luc RoymansHouse G-S / Graux & Baeyens Architecten © Luc RoymansHouse G-S / Graux & Baeyens Architecten © Luc RoymansHouse G-S / Graux & Baeyens Architecten © Luc RoymansHouse G-S / Graux & Baeyens Architecten © Luc RoymansHouse G-S / Graux & Baeyens Architecten © Luc RoymansHouse G-S / Graux & Baeyens Architecten © Luc RoymansHouse G-S / Graux & Baeyens Architecten © Luc RoymansHouse G-S / Graux & Baeyens Architecten © Luc RoymansHouse G-S / Graux & Baeyens Architecten © Luc RoymansHouse G-S / Graux & Baeyens Architecten © Luc RoymansHouse G-S / Graux & Baeyens Architecten © Luc RoymansHouse G-S / Graux & Baeyens Architecten © Luc RoymansHouse G-S / Graux & Baeyens Architecten © Luc RoymansHouse G-S / Graux & Baeyens Architecten © Luc RoymansHouse G-S / Graux & Baeyens Architecten © Luc RoymansHouse G-S / Graux & Baeyens Architecten © Luc RoymansHouse G-S / Graux & Baeyens Architecten © Luc RoymansHouse G-S / Graux & Baeyens Architecten © Luc RoymansHouse G-S / Graux & Baeyens Architecten © Luc RoymansHouse G-S / Graux & Baeyens Architecten © Luc RoymansHouse G-S / Graux & Baeyens Architecten © Luc RoymansHouse G-S / Graux & Baeyens Architecten © Luc Roymansplans plansscheme schemesection section