Posts

Ginza Steak Tajima / Doyle Collection

© Satoshi Umetsu/ Nacasa&Partners

Architect: Doyle CollectionAiji Inoue
Location: Tokyo, Japan
Project Area: 103.95 sqm
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Satoshi Umetsu/ Nacasa&Partners

© Satoshi Umetsu/ Nacasa&Partners

Shiny wooden paneled walls surround the interior along with the counter. These panels exude dignity and the texture create tension and high-quality mood. “Ginza Steak TAJIMA” made its grand opening at Ginza, Tokyo, one of the leading cities in Japan.

© Satoshi Umetsu/ Nacasa&Partners

Initially, our client’s needs were to create high quality and dignity interior using genuine materials. After having further hearing, we noticed that our client was always very familiar with stones. Firstly, we proposed the idea of using solid board panels instead of stones to constitute the walls. As for the base, we cut out big horse chestnut solid board panels into 13 mm thickness, commonly used for making counters with one piece. These specially-manufactured panels have different grain pattern expressions.

© Satoshi Umetsu/ Nacasa&Partners

The panels are then laid and pasted to produce symmetric appearance. Apparently, they look like marbles, but you can still feel the warmth of the wood. Moreover, we deliberately used 3 different types of dyeing process. In this way, you will discover even more rhythmic feelings, aspects, and the shadings in the wall. Lastly, we finished up by polishing clear paints in order to make shiny surface, yet leaving the wooden texture. We were able to create totally new-type-material.

© Satoshi Umetsu/ Nacasa&Partners

Apart from this, we avoided using ordinary stones and woods. We selected Oya-stones (very famous stones that represent Japan). To make contrast with the shiny wooden panels, we pasted various sized glides of Oya-Stones. As for the wooden door of hanging cupboards, the surfaces are curved in the technique called Naguri, also famous for Japanese traditional curving.

© Satoshi Umetsu/ Nacasa&Partners

And for the private dining room, transmissive stones occupy the whole wall and grids made with mirrored square pipes are used for the interior. You will feel something very special here through these infinite beauties of the stones.

© Satoshi Umetsu/ Nacasa&Partners

“Ginza Steak TAJIMA” offers full course meal of Kobe Beef and clam that are recognized worldwide. We are glad to present our design and thoroughly detailed interior. There are no other characteristic restaurants like here.

plan01

GINZA STEAK TAJIMA / Aiji Inoue - DOYLE COLLECTION CO.,LTD. (9) © Satoshi Umetsu/ Nacasa&Partners
GINZA STEAK TAJIMA / Aiji Inoue - DOYLE COLLECTION CO.,LTD. (1) © Satoshi Umetsu/ Nacasa&Partners
GINZA STEAK TAJIMA / Aiji Inoue - DOYLE COLLECTION CO.,LTD. (2) © Satoshi Umetsu/ Nacasa&Partners
GINZA STEAK TAJIMA / Aiji Inoue - DOYLE COLLECTION CO.,LTD. (3) © Satoshi Umetsu/ Nacasa&Partners
GINZA STEAK TAJIMA / Aiji Inoue - DOYLE COLLECTION CO.,LTD. (4) © Satoshi Umetsu/ Nacasa&Partners
GINZA STEAK TAJIMA / Aiji Inoue - DOYLE COLLECTION CO.,LTD. (5) © Satoshi Umetsu/ Nacasa&Partners
GINZA STEAK TAJIMA / Aiji Inoue - DOYLE COLLECTION CO.,LTD. (6) © Satoshi Umetsu/ Nacasa&Partners
GINZA STEAK TAJIMA / Aiji Inoue - DOYLE COLLECTION CO.,LTD. (7) © Satoshi Umetsu/ Nacasa&Partners
GINZA STEAK TAJIMA / Aiji Inoue - DOYLE COLLECTION CO.,LTD. (8) © Satoshi Umetsu/ Nacasa&Partners
GINZA STEAK TAJIMA / Aiji Inoue - DOYLE COLLECTION CO.,LTD. (10) © Satoshi Umetsu/ Nacasa&Partners
GINZA STEAK TAJIMA / Aiji Inoue - DOYLE COLLECTION CO.,LTD. (11) © Satoshi Umetsu/ Nacasa&Partners
GINZA STEAK TAJIMA / Aiji Inoue - DOYLE COLLECTION CO.,LTD. (12) © Satoshi Umetsu/ Nacasa&Partners
Plan plan01
Section section01
Section section02
Section section03
Section section04
Section section05
Section section06

Ginza Steak Tajima / Doyle Collection originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 04 Jul 2012.

send to Twitter | Share on Facebook | What do you think about this?

Stöðin / Krads

© Kristinn Magnússon

Architects: Krads
Location: Borgarnes, Iceland
Project Year: 2012
Project Area: 4.84 sqm
Photographs: Kristinn Magnússon

“Stöðin”, a roadside stop in the Icelandic countryside, is a conjoined restaurant, drive-through, convenience store and gas station.

© Kristinn Magnússon

Icelandic culture is in many ways shaped by American influences due to the 65-year long presence of an American army base in the country. Stöðin addresses this cultural relationship by incorporating architectural elements from the American diner that contrast the traditional Icelandic building method of in situ cast concrete. The exposed concrete of the exterior bestows the diner with a permanence unknown by its American counterparts creating a friction between its streamlined aesthetics and the rustic materiality’s gravity.

© Kristinn Magnússon

An elongated bar-desk transforms into seating arrangements and characterizes the semicircular restaurant, which offers panoramic views of the scenic fjord Borgarfjörður.

Stöðin / Krads © Kristinn Magnússon
Stöðin / Krads © Kristinn Magnússon
Stöðin / Krads © Kristinn Magnússon
Stöðin / Krads © Kristinn Magnússon
Stöðin / Krads © Kristinn Magnússon
Stöðin / Krads © Kristinn Magnússon
Stöðin / Krads © Kristinn Magnússon
Stöðin / Krads Plan 01
Stöðin / Krads Plan 02
elevations & section elevations & section
STODIN LOCATION location

Stöðin / Krads originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 02 Jul 2012.

send to Twitter | Share on Facebook | What do you think about this?

Elqui Domos Astronomical Hotel / Rodrigo Duque Motta

© Cristóbal Palma

Architects: Rodrigo Duque Motta
Location: Pisco Elqui, Paiguano, Coquimbo Region, Chile
Design Team: Martin Holmes, Catalina Ventura, Jorge Siviero
Project Year: 2011
Renderings: Cinema Arquitectura
Photographs: Cristóbal Palma

Project Area: 164 sqm
Site Area: 4,000 sqm

Elqui Domos is a small 10-year-old hotel located in the heart of Valle del Elqui, a narrow valley stretched in between the Andes Mountains.The valley is renowned for its sharp, clear skies and pleasant weather, as well as for its great potential for wine growing, astronomy, and tourism.

Site Plan

The Hotel comprises several single wooden-structured cabins that provide translucent fabric domes, enabling an experience that encourages a close connection with nature as well as unique night-sky viewing –through the cabins’ roof hatches–while lying beneath the stars.

© Cinema Arquitectura

The project’s commission included remodeling the existing seven domes, the restaurant-lobby and the addition of several newcabins, in order to maximize the site’s potential. Our main challenge was to carry out an intervention that would improve the domes’ living condition while highlighting the elements that make this hotel so unique.

© Cristóbal Palma

To refashion the existing rooms, we emphasized the role of the terrace as main living area, and highlighted a specific sense of lightness –usually found in textile architecture– by placing the cabins’ volumes barely sitting on the land, reminiscent of foreign artifacts used for sleeping, dominating the landscape, or staring at the stars.

© Cristóbal Palma

For the new bedrooms (first build stage) the idea was to come up with a room type that would provide a complementary alternative ­–with better living standards than the fabric domes–, that would make better use of the available land, while maintaining and enhancing the conditions that make Elqui Domos such a special experience.

Cottage Section 02

The fact that the new rooms had to be placed exactly where the topography changes –between the vast vegetation of the valley and the harsh, dry mountain overhang– called for bringing this condition to light. To achieve this, we conceived a type of cabin that was raised above the ground and had an inside graded space, which would negotiate the two different views –valleyand mountains– by opposing two glass walls across the entire width of the cabin. The transparent wall that shows the mountains was suggested as a junction between wall and sky, angled in a way that would allow it’s peak to be seen from anywhere within the cabin. At the same time it would allow to recreate the feel of lying beneath the stars the existing dome cabins provide. The roof deck was the fina lelement, placed so that it revives the dominant and privileged position of the cabins towards the geography.

© Cristóbal Palma

Elqui Domos Astronomical Hotel / Rodrigo Duque Motta © Cristóbal Palma
Elqui Domos Astronomical Hotel / Rodrigo Duque Motta © Cristóbal Palma
Elqui Domos Astronomical Hotel / Rodrigo Duque Motta © Cristóbal Palma
Elqui Domos Astronomical Hotel / Rodrigo Duque Motta © Cristóbal Palma
Elqui Domos Astronomical Hotel / Rodrigo Duque Motta © Cristóbal Palma
Elqui Domos Astronomical Hotel / Rodrigo Duque Motta © Cristóbal Palma
Elqui Domos Astronomical Hotel / Rodrigo Duque Motta © Cristóbal Palma
Elqui Domos Astronomical Hotel / Rodrigo Duque Motta © Cristóbal Palma
Elqui Domos Astronomical Hotel / Rodrigo Duque Motta © Cinema Arquitectura
Elqui Domos Astronomical Hotel / Rodrigo Duque Motta © Cinema Arquitectura
Elqui Domos Astronomical Hotel / Rodrigo Duque Motta Site Plan 01
Elqui Domos Astronomical Hotel / Rodrigo Duque Motta Cottage First Floor Plan 01
Elqui Domos Astronomical Hotel / Rodrigo Duque Motta Cottage Terrace Plan 01
Elqui Domos Astronomical Hotel / Rodrigo Duque Motta Cottage Section 01 01
Elqui Domos Astronomical Hotel / Rodrigo Duque Motta Cottage Section 02 01
Elqui Domos Astronomical Hotel / Rodrigo Duque Motta Cottage East Elevation 01
Elqui Domos Astronomical Hotel / Rodrigo Duque Motta Cottage South Elevation 01
Elqui Domos Astronomical Hotel / Rodrigo Duque Motta Dome First Floor Plan 01
Elqui Domos Astronomical Hotel / Rodrigo Duque Motta Dome Second Floor Plan 01
Elqui Domos Astronomical Hotel / Rodrigo Duque Motta Dome Section 01

Elqui Domos Astronomical Hotel / Rodrigo Duque Motta originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 02 Jul 2012.

send to Twitter | Share on Facebook | What do you think about this?

Phos Restaurant in Mykonos Town / LM Architects

© Vangelis Paterakis

Architects: LM Architects
Location: , Greece
Design Team: Mariza Aggelidi, Lila Galata, Ariadni Kafetzi, Bettina Velliou
Proyect Year: 2012
Photographs: Vangelis Paterakis

© Vangelis Paterakis

The greek light, a source of inspiration in any area of artistic creation, lent its name to the new greek restaurant PHOS, Mykonos
(PHOS is the greek word for light).

In this project we handled the shaping of the restaurant area by expressing traditional elements, through a contemporary view. Selecting, as a starting point for inspiration, the shade structure of the greek islands, which owes its existence to the stark greek light, an architectural element was created that shapes the identity of the restaurant area. The deconstruction of the wooden pergola and its mutation into a sculpture expresses our view, regarding the participation of traditional notions in contemporary architecture, denoted in a subversive manner. 

Phos Restaurant In Mykonos Town / LM Architects © Vangelis Paterakis
Phos Restaurant In Mykonos Town / LM Architects © Vangelis Paterakis
Phos Restaurant In Mykonos Town / LM Architects © Vangelis Paterakis
Phos Restaurant In Mykonos Town / LM Architects © Vangelis Paterakis
Phos Restaurant In Mykonos Town / LM Architects Floor 01
Phos Restaurant In Mykonos Town / LM Architects Floor 02
Phos Restaurant In Mykonos Town / LM Architects Elevation 01

It Me Eco Fast Restaurant / Joanna Pszczó?ka + ?ukasz Brandys

© Joanna Pszczó?ka

Architects: Joanna Pszczó?ka + ?ukasz Brandys
Location: , Poland
Photographs: Joanna Pszczó?ka

   

© Joanna Pszczó?ka

It!me fast food restaurant, which is located in Dream Park in Ochaby, was created at the beginning of July, 2011. It is the first branch of the planned chain of eco-restaurants. The designers made an attempt to give this small place an image that would make it distinct from other fast food brands. A mixture of elements, such as a proper choice of materials, limited colour gamut and refined details allowed the designers to achieve an unpretentious effect of modern and delicate beauty. It determined an unambiguous identity of this brand new restaurant.

The entire image was adjusted to the small size of the place and its function. However, the project was not only confined to the decor. The designers created the entire brand, including the image which stands against other restaurants’ image, its name, logo, even the packaging project, a set of instructions for preparing food, advertising campaign and furniture.

© Joanna Pszczó?ka

The main idea was to create an eco-brand which makes use of biodegradable ecological materials. The designers had to face the problem of small and limited architectural space and to find a place for fifty sitting places as it was the investor’s requirement. In order to optically enlarge the interior, the floor to ceiling windows were used. There are no traditional tables but only table tops fastened to the load-bearing walls. Tables with no legs make it easier to keep the restaurant clean, they also enlarge the space, and enable people on wheelchairs to eat in the restaurant without designing a separate place which would be accessible to them.

© Joanna Pszczó?ka

The restaurants’ walls were made of concrete blocks covered with non-woven geotextile fabric. The light wooden construction, with slats made of coniferous plywood on top of it, was fastened to the walls. The table tops are metal with MFD panels screwed to them. The white and thick laminate, used in gastronomy, was stuck on top of them.

diagram

The chairs were made of deciduous plywood, with each element cut by use of NC milling machine and then stuck together with ecological and biodegradable glue. The warm colour of plywood and cold whiteness were complemented with green which is associated with eco-products and brands. The same colour scheme was used on the packaging and this is the essence of It!me ecology.

diagram

The designers’ aim was to use as little paper as possible, and to get rid of full packaging for hamburgers, tortillas and cakes and replace them with wrappers which reduce paper use to only 25%. The staff wraps a hamburger in a thick greaseproof paper and puts a thick and narrow cardboard with only a logo and product’s name on it. Folding of the packaging doesn’t require a glue which is possible due to special folds which hold the construction together.

diagram

It has the trapezium shape which additionally stiffens the packaging. Only Kraft paper made of waste paper and virgin fibres which can be recycled was used for packaging production. The usage of printing ink enables composting and has no impact on the quality of it. The designers tried to eliminate plastic in the process of packages designing, however, the chain is still to small to get rid of it completely and to create a well-designed material for production of mugs for carbonated drinks. All plastic elements are made of PET material which can be easily recycled. The restaurant is equipped with recycling bins and the consumer recycles the waste itself. Sorted waste is collected by a recycling company.

The designers took care of the balanced development during their entire work. Because of that all elements used in the restaurant were created with help of small companies located in the neighbourhood of Ochaby. The majority of them were small enterprises since only these companies were willing to face the challenge of creating the design. They managed to meet the requirements, both aesthetical and financial since, in comparison to other fast food chains, the budget was rather small. The entire project was complemented with graphical elements designed in the same manner as the interior and the packaging. The main colours used were white, beige and green.

The image was created by the UL DESIGN company (Joanna Pszczó?ka and ?ukasz Brandys). It took four months to achieve the final result, however, the designers are still working on the development of the It!me brand.

It Me Eco Fast Restaurant / Joanna Pszczolka (??web site), Lukasz Brandys © Joanna Pszczó?ka
It Me Eco Fast Restaurant / Joanna Pszczolka (??web site), Lukasz Brandys © Joanna Pszczó?ka
It Me Eco Fast Restaurant / Joanna Pszczolka (??web site), Lukasz Brandys © Joanna Pszczó?ka
It Me Eco Fast Restaurant / Joanna Pszczolka (??web site), Lukasz Brandys © Joanna Pszczó?ka
It Me Eco Fast Restaurant / Joanna Pszczolka (??web site), Lukasz Brandys © Joanna Pszczó?ka
It Me Eco Fast Restaurant / Joanna Pszczolka (??web site), Lukasz Brandys © Joanna Pszczó?ka
It Me Eco Fast Restaurant / Joanna Pszczolka (??web site), Lukasz Brandys © Joanna Pszczó?ka
It Me Eco Fast Restaurant / Joanna Pszczolka (??web site), Lukasz Brandys © Joanna Pszczó?ka
It Me Eco Fast Restaurant / Joanna Pszczolka (??web site), Lukasz Brandys © Joanna Pszczó?ka
drawing 01 diagram
drawing 02 diagram
drawing 03 diagram

Copperhill Mountain Lodge / AIX Arkitekter AB

Architects: AIX Arkitekter AB
Location: Åre, Sweden
Project Team: Peter Q. Bohlin, FAIA, Principal for Design – William D. Loose, AIA, Project Manager
Project Area: 183,000 GSF
Project Year: 2009
Photographer: Nic Lehoux, Jonas Kullman

© Nic Lehoux

Tucked in the north slope of Sweden’s Mount Förberget, just beneath the crest of the mountain at a height of 730 meters above the sea, Copperhill Mountain Lodge offers extensive vistas including views of Jämtland’s mountains and lake

© Nic Lehoux

The lodge stretches parallel to the site’s natural topography, preserving the tree line; its plan is layered with the terrain to maximize both daylight exposure and views of the extraordinary landscape. Each suite was prefabricated offsite and lifted into the building’s heavy timber frame. Projected windows and balconies angle outward in staccato patterns across the long wood clad facades, finished in Falu Rödfärg Black, a traditional finish with origins in the copper mines of Sweden.

 

Two slim wings flank the south facing heart of the building and their projected thin edges lighten the mass of the building which rests upon a plinth of regional Offerdal slate. A vehicular roundabout made of the same dark stone marks the entry at the elongated principal façade. The entry is on axis with a massive stone fireplace and a view of Åreskutan, the ski mountain. All of the hotel’s primary amenities are accessed from the entry level set over underground parking.

 

© Nic Lehoux

The challenge was to make a great space in this northern world of short days and cold nights. At the heart of the lodge is the fireplace, set in a tall volume of articulated pine structure and cladding. Skylights bathe the space in natural light. The lodge looks out to the alpine world and into a warm gathering place, glowing with comfort and activity.

section

Copperhill Mountain Lodge / AIX Arkitekter AB © Nic Lehoux
Copperhill Mountain Lodge / AIX Arkitekter AB © Nic Lehoux
Copperhill Mountain Lodge / AIX Arkitekter AB © Nic Lehoux
Copperhill Mountain Lodge / AIX Arkitekter AB © Nic Lehoux
Copperhill Mountain Lodge / AIX Arkitekter AB © Nic Lehoux
Copperhill Mountain Lodge / AIX Arkitekter AB © Nic Lehoux
Copperhill Mountain Lodge / AIX Arkitekter AB © Nic Lehoux
Copperhill Mountain Lodge / AIX Arkitekter AB © Nic Lehoux
Copperhill Mountain Lodge / AIX Arkitekter AB © Jonas Kullman
Copperhill Mountain Lodge / AIX Arkitekter AB © Jonas Kullman
Copperhill Mountain Lodge / AIX Arkitekter AB © Jonas Kullman
Section section
Plan plan02
Sketch Sketch

NOMA Lab / GXN (Innovation Unit of 3XN)

Architects: GXN (Innovation Unit of 3XN)
Location: Strandgade 93, 1401 ,
Project team: Kim Herforth Nielsen, Kasper Guldager Jørgensen, André van Leth, Lila Held, Morten Norman Lund, Lars-Erik Eriksson, Pedram Seddighzadeh, Matthew Scarlett, Bjørk Christensen, Kyle Baumgardner, Elliot Mistur, Tore Banke, Simon McKenzie and Jacob Hilmer
Project Area: 200 sqm
Project Year: 2012
Client: Restaurant NOMA
Photographs: Adam Mørk

 

New Inspiration

As the number one ranked restaurant on theworlds50best.com for two years in a row, the expectations for creative innovation at NOMA are higher than ever before. Therein lay the need for an inspiring ‘experimentarium’ where chefs could continue to take their skills further in the evolution and development of Nordic cuisine. This commission was given to 3XN’s Innovation Unit, GXN, whose experimental design was an excellent match for NOMA’s innovative gastronomy.

We have been happy to work with GXN on the transformation of our former meeting rooms. The result is great and has contributed to not only the space, but also organizational life and inspiration,’ says Founder and Chef of NOMA, Rene Redzepi.

Head of GXN, Kasper Guldager Jørgensen refers to the project as an Architectural Cookbook and says of the collaboration, ‘We move in parallel worlds. NOMA’s dedicated and creative engagement in gastronomy is similar in many ways to GXN’s experimental take on new materials and ingredients in the architectural world.’

Nordic, Raw and Playful

The NOMA Lab is connected to NOMA situated in a former warehouse on the national registry of protected buildings. The tight restrictions meant that GXN was required to design the interior without using so much as one single nail in the walls or flooring. The approach was to design four central multi-functional storage units; each composed from over five hundred uniquely formed wooden cubes. Curving playfully throughout the space, these units divide the 200M2 room into smaller areas accommodating the Food Lab, the herb garden, staff areas and office. Raw and simple, through colours and forms, it captures a unique Nordic aesthetic. True to the restaurant’s philosophy, the NOMA Lab is developed exclusively using Nordic materials.

The organic forms of the furniture pieces stand out through use of integrated light features, which also give the interior a lighter feel. The additional lighting is provided by GXN’s specially developed STAR lamp, whose reflective light casts dramatic geometric shadows into the surroundings.

Three Dimensional Puzzle

The NOMA Lab has been an opportunity for GXN to experiment with digital design methods. ‘For the project, we developed a ‘living software’ which made it possible to send drawings direct to fabrication from the computer. It’s kind of similar to printing a text one has just typed – but instead we are printing furniture pieces,’ explains Kasper Guldager Jørgensen on the design method. In practice, it meant that the interior was delivered as a three dimensional puzzle of over 5000 pieces that were assembled without the help of any carpenters.

In addition to the ‘direct from computer to printer’ interior pieces, furniture manufacturers GUBI, CPH Square and Gaggenau have been major contributors to the NOMA Lab.

NOMA Lab / GXN (Innovation Unit of 3XN) (11) © Adam MørkNOMA Lab / GXN (Innovation Unit of 3XN) (1) © Adam MørkNOMA Lab / GXN (Innovation Unit of 3XN) (2) © Adam MørkNOMA Lab / GXN (Innovation Unit of 3XN) (3) © Adam MørkNOMA Lab / GXN (Innovation Unit of 3XN) (4) © Adam MørkNOMA Lab / GXN (Innovation Unit of 3XN) (5) © Adam MørkNOMA Lab / GXN (Innovation Unit of 3XN) (6) © Adam MørkNOMA Lab / GXN (Innovation Unit of 3XN) (7) © Adam MørkNOMA Lab / GXN (Innovation Unit of 3XN) (8) © Adam MørkNOMA Lab / GXN (Innovation Unit of 3XN) (9) © Adam MørkNOMA Lab / GXN (Innovation Unit of 3XN) (10) © Adam MørkNOMA Lab / GXN (Innovation Unit of 3XN) (12) © Adam MørkNOMA Lab / GXN (Innovation Unit of 3XN) (13) © Adam MørkNOMA Lab / GXN (Innovation Unit of 3XN) (14) © Adam MørkNOMA Lab / GXN (Innovation Unit of 3XN) (15) © Adam MørkNOMA Lab / GXN (Innovation Unit of 3XN) (16) © Adam MørkNOMA Lab / GXN (Innovation Unit of 3XN) (17) © Adam MørkPlan Plan