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6 Politically Motivated Cities Built From Scratch

Threatening to end Cairo’s 1,046 year dominance as the country’s capital, earlier this month the government of Egypt announced their intentions to create a new, yet-to-be-named capital city just east of New Cairo. The promise of the more than 270… Sigue leyendo

Studio Fuksas Selected to Design Canberra’s Australia Forum

Italian architects Studio Fuksas have been selected, along with Canberra-based Guida Moseley Brown Architects, to design the Australia Forum, a new national convention centre in Canberra, Australia. Located at one apex of Central Canberra’s Parliamentary Triangle, Studio Fuksas describe their design… Sigue leyendo

Lodge on the Lake Exhibition

In light of the strong responses to their Lodge on the Lake competition, organized in collaboration with the University of Canberra and won by Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts and Jack Davies in May, the Gallery of Australian Design is hosting an exhibition of the submissions to the competition, including models of the entries created specially created for the exhibition.

The competition itself was organized to mark the centenary of Canberra being named Australia’s new capital. Entrants were asked to design a new house for the Australian Prime Minister, to replace the current building on Adelaide Avenue. This building has been home to 16 of Australia’s 27 Prime Ministers since it was completed in 1927 as part of the new capital city.

Though the competition was for a design to replace the building, this is in fact an attempt to save the current Prime Minister’s home; over the years the role of the building has evolved, and this has resulted in a number of extensions and security features being added to the building which are not sympathetic to the original classical design style. By proposing a new home for the Prime Minister, the competition is suggesting a way to preserve the building as an important monument to the country’s last 100 years of history, as well as replacing a building which is no longer suited to its function.

The winner of the competition was commended for their design which “reflects the informal nature of contemporary Australian lifestyles and architecture, while providing attractive larger spaces for public gatherings”. The exhibition of the best entries is intended to raise awareness and public support for the idea of a new Prime Minister’s residence, as it is generally acknowledged that the current building is no longer fit for purpose.

Title: Lodge on the Lake Exhibition
Website: http://www.gad.org.au/exhibitions.php
Organizers: University of Canberra, Gallery of Australian Design
From: Thu, 15 Aug 2013 00:00
Until: Sat, 16 Nov 2013 00:00
Venue: Gallery of Australian Design
Address: Queen Elizabeth Terrace, Parkes ACT 2600, Australia

Lodge on the Lake Exhibition The winning entry. Image © Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies
Lodge on the Lake Exhibition Image of the exhibition. Image © Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies
Lodge on the Lake Exhibition Image of the exhibition. Image © Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies
Lodge on the Lake Exhibition Model of the winning entry. Image © Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies
Lodge on the Lake Exhibition Ground Floor Plan of the winning entry. Image © Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies
Lodge on the Lake Exhibition The winning entry. Image © Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies
Lodge on the Lake Exhibition The winning entry. Image © Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies
Lodge on the Lake Exhibition Site Plan of the winning entry. Image © Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies
Lodge on the Lake Exhibition The winning entry. Image © Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies

Lodge on the Lake Exhibition originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 26 Oct 2013.

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Lodge on the Lake Exhibition

In light of the strong responses to their Lodge on the Lake competition, organized in collaboration with the University of Canberra and won by Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts and Jack Davies in May, the Gallery of Australian Design is hosting an exhibition of the submissions to the competition, including models of the entries created specially created for the exhibition.

The competition itself was organized to mark the centenary of Canberra being named Australia’s new capital. Entrants were asked to design a new house for the Australian Prime Minister, to replace the current building on Adelaide Avenue. This building has been home to 16 of Australia’s 27 Prime Ministers since it was completed in 1927 as part of the new capital city.

Though the competition was for a design to replace the building, this is in fact an attempt to save the current Prime Minister’s home; over the years the role of the building has evolved, and this has resulted in a number of extensions and security features being added to the building which are not sympathetic to the original classical design style. By proposing a new home for the Prime Minister, the competition is suggesting a way to preserve the building as an important monument to the country’s last 100 years of history, as well as replacing a building which is no longer suited to its function.

The winner of the competition was commended for their design which “reflects the informal nature of contemporary Australian lifestyles and architecture, while providing attractive larger spaces for public gatherings”. The exhibition of the best entries is intended to raise awareness and public support for the idea of a new Prime Minister’s residence, as it is generally acknowledged that the current building is no longer fit for purpose.

Title: Lodge on the Lake Exhibition
Website: http://www.gad.org.au/exhibitions.php
Organizers: University of Canberra, Gallery of Australian Design
From: Thu, 15 Aug 2013 00:00
Until: Sat, 16 Nov 2013 00:00
Venue: Gallery of Australian Design
Address: Queen Elizabeth Terrace, Parkes ACT 2600, Australia

Lodge on the Lake Exhibition The winning entry. Image © Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies
Lodge on the Lake Exhibition Image of the exhibition. Image © Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies
Lodge on the Lake Exhibition Image of the exhibition. Image © Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies
Lodge on the Lake Exhibition Model of the winning entry. Image © Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies
Lodge on the Lake Exhibition Ground Floor Plan of the winning entry. Image © Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies
Lodge on the Lake Exhibition The winning entry. Image © Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies
Lodge on the Lake Exhibition The winning entry. Image © Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies
Lodge on the Lake Exhibition Site Plan of the winning entry. Image © Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies
Lodge on the Lake Exhibition The winning entry. Image © Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies

Lodge on the Lake Exhibition originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 26 Oct 2013.

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ARBORETUM / Tonkin Zulaikha Greer Architects

Architects: Tonkin Zulaikha Greer Architects
Location: Canberra, Australia
Collaborators: Tonkin Zulaikha Greer with Taylor CullityLethlean
Area: 4,000 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Brett Boardman

From the architect. The Village Centre is the main point of arrival for the National Arboretum Canberra, providing visitor orientation, information, education spaces and interpretation, together with retail and a high-quality café.

The building occupies the northern end of the Event Terrace, sitting below the site’s main east-west ridge, overlooking the sculpted landform of the Central Valley and the adjoining planted forests. It connects the central car park with the major Play Space and the Central Valley northwards and the Event Terrace, grassed Amphitheatre, Gardens and pedestrian pathway network to the south. Visitors enter the Arboretum from the carpark through the new building, passing through the dramatic Entry cutting formed through the forested knoll and serving as the initial orientation focus of the building.

The heart of the building is its main vaulted space, which flexibly accommodates a range of functions, including exhibitions, functions, retail, the café and programmed activities. It focuses on the dramatic views southeast to Lake Burley Griffin and city of Canberra, and opens to the north and south to the sweep of the Event Terrace. The architecture develops the long-standing tradition of significant garden buildings as transparent enclosures with dramatic internal volumes and sense of indoor-outdoor connection.

The exterior of the building is a sculptural form in the rolling topography of the site, contrasting low stone-clad wings with a high arching roof clad in weathered zinc, the form of which is inspired by the fronds of the adjoining forest of Chilean Wine Palms.

Internally, the innovative timber structure combines low environmental impact with a dramatic forest-like form, designed in a series of geometrical arcs. Slivers of glass define the roof shape towards the entry and light the arrival point inside. The building incorporates a range of energy-saving measures, supporting the environmental value of the Arboretum as a whole, with a very low-energy envelope and structure.

ARBORETUM / Tonkin Zulaikha Greer Architects © Brett Boardman
ARBORETUM / Tonkin Zulaikha Greer Architects © Brett Boardman
ARBORETUM / Tonkin Zulaikha Greer Architects © Brett Boardman
ARBORETUM / Tonkin Zulaikha Greer Architects © Brett Boardman
ARBORETUM / Tonkin Zulaikha Greer Architects © Brett Boardman
ARBORETUM / Tonkin Zulaikha Greer Architects © Brett Boardman
ARBORETUM / Tonkin Zulaikha Greer Architects © Brett Boardman
ARBORETUM / Tonkin Zulaikha Greer Architects © Brett Boardman
ARBORETUM / Tonkin Zulaikha Greer Architects © Brett Boardman
ARBORETUM / Tonkin Zulaikha Greer Architects © Brett Boardman
ARBORETUM / Tonkin Zulaikha Greer Architects Elevation
ARBORETUM / Tonkin Zulaikha Greer Architects Elevation
ARBORETUM / Tonkin Zulaikha Greer Architects Plan
ARBORETUM / Tonkin Zulaikha Greer Architects Plan
ARBORETUM / Tonkin Zulaikha Greer Architects Diagram

ARBORETUM / Tonkin Zulaikha Greer Architects originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 07 Aug 2013.

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‘The Lodge on the Lake’ Third Prize Winning Proposal / Nic Moore + Monica Earl

Designed by architects Nic Moore and Monica Earl, in collaboration with Lea Fernandez, Darryl Chandler, and Terence Yong, their third prize winning proposal for the Lodge on the Lake understands that a new Lodge needs both to fulfill the requirements of a complex brief, but also to be a strong symbol of Australian domestic and political values. This scheme is sited at the tip of Attunga Point and requires the sculpting of the Lake’s shore in order to bury a low landscape building in the ridge of the promontory. This building is made by fingers of heavy earthen walls, which project into the Lake. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Lake Burley Griffin required massive civil works. Two meters of soil was scraped from a river valley; beach sand, retaining walls and boulders were brought to an imagined shore and a sluice gate was shut to impound the Molonglo river. The Lake’s level is presently held constant to this carefully crafted shoreline by manipulations of the Scrivener and Googong dams, but this level can fluctuate with rainfall and climate.

There are eight walls in total. Where these walls terminate, ghats of stone step down to the water, whatever its level. Between these walls, the Lake’s water is held in ponds for thermal stability, bouncing light and creating calm. The proposed ghats and alluvial gardens associated with the scheme reshape the shoreline of the Lake, creating places to sit and places to fish. Siting the Lodge at the tip of Attunga Point was important because by becoming part of the Lake’s shore, the building becomes part of Canberra.

These heavy earthen walls are rammed from 425 million year old sedimentary rock belonging to the Yarralumla Formation, found on site. These walls variously enclose formal rooms, create courtyards, hold water and define paths of circulation. The heaviest and tallest wall is to the east and has one opening, the symbolic front door. The lowest and most open wall is to the west and forms a threshold to the symbolic back yard of the Lodge. These walls align with the rock on site to point towards midday in the northeastern sky. These walls frame views of the city for visitors to the Lodge and views of visitors to the Lodge for the city.

The Prime Minister’s private lodgings are held above, but perpendicular to the walls, orienting to the northwest. By orienting this way, these private lodgings find tranquility in the little bay and prospect towards Black Mountain and the National Arboretum. Private outdoor space is held within walled terraces, which step downwards for privacy and security, and become part of the symbolic back yard.

A delicate leaf-form roof is held above the earthen walls and serves simultaneously as an operable shading device, a collector of water, a collector of solar energy and, over the years, a collector of many interesting people and stories. As an equivalent to the White House, the Lodge must be the hearth of the nation – a command post, an event space, a sanctuary and an icon.

‘The Lodge on the Lake’ Third Prize Winning Proposal / Nic Moore + Monica Earl Courtesy of Nic Moore + Monica Earl
‘The Lodge on the Lake’ Third Prize Winning Proposal / Nic Moore + Monica Earl Courtesy of Nic Moore + Monica Earl
‘The Lodge on the Lake’ Third Prize Winning Proposal / Nic Moore + Monica Earl Courtesy of Nic Moore + Monica Earl
‘The Lodge on the Lake’ Third Prize Winning Proposal / Nic Moore + Monica Earl Courtesy of Nic Moore + Monica Earl
‘The Lodge on the Lake’ Third Prize Winning Proposal / Nic Moore + Monica Earl site plan
‘The Lodge on the Lake’ Third Prize Winning Proposal / Nic Moore + Monica Earl plan 01
‘The Lodge on the Lake’ Third Prize Winning Proposal / Nic Moore + Monica Earl plan 02

‘The Lodge on the Lake’ Third Prize Winning Proposal / Nic Moore + Monica Earl originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 12 Jun 2013.

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‘The Lodge on the Lake’ Competition Entry / Stephen Collier Architects

In this proposal for a new Australian Prime Ministers lodge, the core concept focused around the question; ‘What if the British had embraced Indigenous culture in 1788?’ Designed by Stephen Collier Architects, they propose to reconfigure and redefine this boundary of the lodge as a ring of landscape that is retained for public use. This land would be defined by a cluster of deciduous trees while public access to Lake Burley Griffin for all Australians will remain in perpetuity. More images and architects’ description after the break.

What if the British, instead of completely and summarily dismissing Aboriginal people and their culture, took a more open approach to Aboriginal people, culture and knowledge systems? This country would be one where the chances of an indigenous or non-indigenous Prime Minister would have been the same at every election since Federation. As a result Australia would now have an equal meeting of cultures and (cultural) influence.

We propose 3 key moves:

1.  A permanent and protective structure of roof forms (reflecting our democracy) with a flexible interior (also representing our culture) that is allowed to evolve;
2.  An undulating visually porous boundary defined on the outside edge by a ring of deciduous trees and vaulted cave-like spaces of art underneath;
3.  A private stroll garden, of amplified native landscape, gently sloping up around the outside edge and allowing local indigenous fauna to move freely, in and out, underneath it. 

After 1788 there were two opposing perspectives of landscape and home: the non- indigenous idea of home in a cultivated landscape of definitive property boundaries, and the indigenous idea of a transient home in a shared and unbounded landscape. Observing that Australia’s watery boundary is still a contested zone of arrival we acknowledge Canberra’s man-made lake and the random property alignment marking the site of the proposed new Lodge. 

We propose separating the administrative and support functions from the private domain. Key groupings of rooms, amenities and staff are arranged in a pinwheel around a central foyer, from which all parts of the landscape can be seen and from which all parts of the house can be accessed. A large private stroll garden becomes a place of reflection and repose. 

An amplified native landscape is enhanced with non-indigenous clusters of liquid amber, poplar and willow. Traces of this new landscape are entwined in and through the buildings. Narrow paths for strolling would be burnt through fields of native grasses and daisies, creating different journeys through and around the garden.

Architects: Stephen Collier Architects
Location: Canberra, Australia
Collaborators: Paolo Stracchi, Maryam Litkouhi, David Janson
Year: 2013

‘The Lodge on the Lake’ Competition Entry / Stephen Collier Architects Courtesy of Stephen Collier Architects
‘The Lodge on the Lake’ Competition Entry / Stephen Collier Architects Courtesy of Stephen Collier Architects
‘The Lodge on the Lake’ Competition Entry / Stephen Collier Architects Courtesy of Stephen Collier Architects
‘The Lodge on the Lake’ Competition Entry / Stephen Collier Architects site plan
‘The Lodge on the Lake’ Competition Entry / Stephen Collier Architects floor plan
‘The Lodge on the Lake’ Competition Entry / Stephen Collier Architects diagram 01
‘The Lodge on the Lake’ Competition Entry / Stephen Collier Architects diagram 02
‘The Lodge on the Lake’ Competition Entry / Stephen Collier Architects diagram 03
‘The Lodge on the Lake’ Competition Entry / Stephen Collier Architects diagram 04
‘The Lodge on the Lake’ Competition Entry / Stephen Collier Architects diagram 05

‘The Lodge on the Lake’ Competition Entry / Stephen Collier Architects originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 02 Jun 2013.

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The Lodge on the Lake Winning Proposal / Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies

Designed by Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, and Jack Davies, the winning proposal for The Lodge on the Lake returns to the issues bound up in Australian identity and issues of modernity. The lodge is both a development and a critique of the Australian relationship of landscape and dwelling, through an intersection of public assembly, intimate domesticity, and ground plane. From the composed house atop a plinth, to the slippages and interpolations that unravel down toward the lake, the lodge on the lake is a democratic marriage of land and architectural typology, introspective private dwelling, and public assembly. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Australia’s earliest settlers encountered a landscape they perceived to be harsh and expansive – ‘they did not see the landscape of infinite space as sublime’ (Malouf, 2010). Elizabeth Farrelly suggests this has led to a self-perpetuating condition in the national psyche – one where the immediate move towards occupation of this landscape is through an endless proliferation outward, along the ground plane. This notion paradoxically suggests both an adventurous exploration of the frontier, and a conservative lack of willingness to make a place within the landscape – to dig in.

Walter Burley Griffin’s 1912 masterplan for Canberra was predicated on the notion that modernist tropes in urban planning could be reconciled with the particularities of topography, suggesting an occupation of the Australian landscape rarely aspired to. 

Formally, the lodge is anchored by a split courtyard form, the frontal half sunk down into the earth forming a thickened, occupiable plinth on which the private volumes rest, while ancillary programs radiate out across the site. The notion of form augmented as a response to ground rewards a secondary reading; the constantly changing spatial conditions across the site resists the architecture being reduced to an idealized object. 

Externally, the building both enfolds the landscape and is subsumed by it. Retaining walls draw visitors into a choreographed entry sequence, pulling them through the earth in a series of intermediary spaces – compressing the archaic nature of the subterranean with shifting weather conditions above. 

Environmentally, the intersection of fluid topography and linear definition is equally considered; water collection aligns with human circulation patterns. These culminate in a series of carefully placed water detention areas, dedicated to purifying water, irrigation, and the prevention of flooding and erosion, depending on their location across the site. 

Materially, the building suggests an acceptance of the Australian landscape’s inherent hostility, utilizing a palette of concrete, local timber and recycled metal sheeting that will endure and record the cyclical patterns of sun, rain, and fire. This attempted reclamation by nature is welcomed, only serving to consolidate its place within the landscape. 

Internally, manipulation of the courtyard form allows a programmatic organisation attuned to both intimate spaces of repose and a monumental depth suitable for public assembly. Coupled with an awareness of the topography outside, these ever-changing patterns occurring internally, encourage inhabitants to find their way through the site – a gesture toward the nomadic Aboriginal mode of dwelling where built-form is occupied like land-form. 

Architects’ Reference: Malouf, D, and Farrelly, E. Landscape and Dwelling, broadcast for Radio National, 7 November 2010

The Lodge on the Lake Winning Proposal / Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies Courtesy of Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, and Jack Davies
The Lodge on the Lake Winning Proposal / Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies Courtesy of Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, and Jack Davies
The Lodge on the Lake Winning Proposal / Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies Courtesy of Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, and Jack Davies
The Lodge on the Lake Winning Proposal / Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies Courtesy of Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, and Jack Davies
The Lodge on the Lake Winning Proposal / Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies Courtesy of Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, and Jack Davies
The Lodge on the Lake Winning Proposal / Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies Courtesy of Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, and Jack Davies
The Lodge on the Lake Winning Proposal / Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies Courtesy of Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, and Jack Davies
The Lodge on the Lake Winning Proposal / Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies Courtesy of Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, and Jack Davies
The Lodge on the Lake Winning Proposal / Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies Courtesy of Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, and Jack Davies
The Lodge on the Lake Winning Proposal / Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies Courtesy of Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, and Jack Davies
The Lodge on the Lake Winning Proposal / Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies Courtesy of Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, and Jack Davies
The Lodge on the Lake Winning Proposal / Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies Courtesy of Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, and Jack Davies
The Lodge on the Lake Winning Proposal / Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies site plan
The Lodge on the Lake Winning Proposal / Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies floor plan
The Lodge on the Lake Winning Proposal / Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies west elevation
The Lodge on the Lake Winning Proposal / Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies section 01
The Lodge on the Lake Winning Proposal / Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies section 02

The Lodge on the Lake Winning Proposal / Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 31 May 2013.

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‘The Lodge on the Lake’ Competition Entry / Other Architects

Titled ‘A House That Floods’, the design for The Lodge on the Lake by Other Architects imagined re-inserting the narrative of the flooding and emptying the lake into the benign, artificial landscape of Canberra. The movement of water acts as a spatial device that dictates and clarifies the otherwise overlapping and confused functions of the Prime Minister’s Lodge. Drained or submerged at certain times, the spaces of the house are optimized for ceremonial events and domestic life, public access and secret meetings. More images and architects’ description after the break.

The competition for the Australian Prime Minister’s official residence was held on the anniversary of Walter Burley Griffins’ winning design for Canberra, Australia’s capital city. Our historical research revealed that the plan for Canberra, an axial and symmetrical city arranged around a man made lake, was inspired by an earlier and little known proposal by Charles Coulter. Coulter sited his capital city on the shores of Lake George, a natural lake that – fed by subterranean aquifers – mysteriously floods and empties at unpredictable intervals.

This is a house that floods and empties, its spaces and rooms shrouded or revealed by the water’s ebb and flow. Carved out of the lake’s depth, the house’s landscape is periodically inundated and reclaimed. Symmetries and reflections emerge and dissipate as the shore­ line advances and recedes. As in Archimedes’ principle, the pooling water is always equal to the volume displaced elsewhere.

Australia’s future capitol city was first glimpsed in Charles Coulter’s 190 watercolor drawing. Like a mirage, Coulter’s Venetian city materialized on the shores of Lake George. The choice of location was curious: fed by a hidden source, the mysterious lake drains and fills at unpredictable intervals. A few years later, surveyor Charles Robert Scrivener sited the capitol within the Molonglo River floodplain. Inspired by Coulter, Scrivener audaciously proposed that the Molonglo be dammed to create its own artificial lake, providing both an ornamental setting and a secure reservoir for the inland city.

Inheriting Scriviner’s concept, the Griffins extracted Canberra’s plan from the negative space of the lake. The line of the shore was drown in precise equilibrium with the constel­lation of surrounding peaks. Inscribed at the intersection of the physical and virtual, the natural and man made, the Griffins’ ideal city plan promised a place for each and every element of the new capitol.

This competition calls for the relocation of the Prime Minister’s Lodge to a site at Lake Burley Griffin, where it joins the other monumental structures connected across water by symmetrical axes and radiating geometries. A place of gathering and solitude, arrival and depar­ture, formality and domesticity, the Lodge is both private residence and public institution. Our proposal is to use the fluctuations of the lake itself to express and regulate these duali­ties.

Occupying the crest of the hill, the Upper House hosts the official activities of the Lodge. At the base of the hill, the Lower House accommodates the private residence and guest suites. The Upper House is a symbolic dwelling, its meeting spaces and function rooms are oriente­d to views of Canberra’s landmarks. Prefabricated and modular, the linear Lower House can be extended or retracted as its inhabitants see fit. The defensible zone is hidden deep within the hill.

Poised beneath the lake’s surface is a grand ceremonial space. Used only for special events, this space is revealed by draining the water within and flooding the land. Con­veyed by capillary action, the displaced water submerges access to a public boardwalk along the foreshore and conceals the private spaces of the Lower House. Lake water can also be sucked up to the Upper House and vaporized into a cloud, shielding Attungo Point from the threat of satellite surveillance, drone strike or paparazzi.

'The Lodge on the Lake' Competition Entry / Other Architects Courtesy of Other Architects
'The Lodge on the Lake' Competition Entry / Other Architects Courtesy of Other Architects
'The Lodge on the Lake' Competition Entry / Other Architects Courtesy of Other Architects
'The Lodge on the Lake' Competition Entry / Other Architects Courtesy of Other Architects
'The Lodge on the Lake' Competition Entry / Other Architects everyday mode
'The Lodge on the Lake' Competition Entry / Other Architects event mode
'The Lodge on the Lake' Competition Entry / Other Architects stealth mode
'The Lodge on the Lake' Competition Entry / Other Architects scene views
'The Lodge on the Lake' Competition Entry / Other Architects plans
'The Lodge on the Lake' Competition Entry / Other Architects section 01
'The Lodge on the Lake' Competition Entry / Other Architects section 02
'The Lodge on the Lake' Competition Entry / Other Architects section 03

'The Lodge on the Lake' Competition Entry / Other Architects originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 28 May 2013.

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The Lodge on the Lake Design Ideas Competition

As part of the celebrations for the Centenary of Canberra in 2013, the University of Canberra and the Gallery of Australian Design invite designers to participate in a Design Ideas Competition for a new official residence for the Prime Minister of Australia. To be located on the shores of Lake Burley Griffin in Canberra, this competition highlights the cultural value of the Prime Minister’s residence at Australia’s seat of government and hopes to build national significance. Submissions are due no later than May 4. To register, and for more information, please visit here.

The Lodge on the Lake Design Ideas Competition originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 06 Feb 2013.

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