Posts

Bruce Munro announces plans for Solar Powered Field of Light at Uluru

© Stephen Weeks

Many of you are aware of Bruce Munro’s dazzling LED ‘Light: Installations’ currently on view until late September in the fields of Pennsylvania’s Longwood Gardens. Well, the famed artist has just announced plans to embark on his largest installation to date – a quarter million solar powered stems of light to cover one square kilometer of land in the heart of the Australian red desert at Uluru (Ayer’s Rock). Fundraising begins today and you can help make it happen.

Continue reading for more information.

 

© Mark Pickthall

The beautiful World Heritage site is both sacred to the Anangu people and seen as a symbol of by many foreigners. Made of Arkosic sandstone, Uluru rises 348 meters above the desert floor allowing it to be visible for miles. During a trip to the red desert in 1992, Munro became transfixed by the barren desert as it was transformed by dormant seeds suddenly bursting into bloom during a rain storm. Thus, making this the birthplace in which Munro first dreamt of the Filed of Light concept.

Munro’s Field of Light at Uluru will consist of 3,290 kilometers of optic fiber and 165 kilometers of recycled 12mm acrylic tube. He is devoted to energy and resource conservation, as well as protecting the land. “We’re going to be extraordinarily careful, and we’re using 500 LED solar-powered illuminators, so that the installation doesn’t waste any power,” Munro stated.

“I consider myself extraordinarily privileged to be invited to work here” said Munro. The desert will be left pristine when Field of Light is dismantled, in October 2013.”

The exhibit is set to open in May 2013. Learn how you can support the project here. The price of each stem is £12 ($18).

© Mark Pickthall

Bruce Munro announces plans for Solar Powered Field of Light at Uluru (1) © Mark Pickthall
Bruce Munro announces plans for Solar Powered Field of Light at Uluru (2) © Stephen Weeks
Bruce Munro announces plans for Solar Powered Field of Light at Uluru (3) © Mark Pickthall
Bruce Munro announces plans for Solar Powered Field of Light at Uluru (4) © Mark Pickthall
Bruce Munro announces plans for Solar Powered Field of Light at Uluru (5) © Mark Pickthall
Bruce Munro announces plans for Solar Powered Field of Light at Uluru (6) © Stephen Weeks
Bruce Munro announces plans for Solar Powered Field of Light at Uluru (7) © Stephen Weeks
Bruce Munro announces plans for Solar Powered Field of Light at Uluru (8) © Mark Pickthall
Bruce Munro announces plans for Solar Powered Field of Light at Uluru (9) © Mark Pickthall

The Green Building Council of Australia Launches Community Ratings for Sustainable Practices

The Green Building Council of has released Green Star – a new comprehensive rating system that can assess the degree to which communities, as a whole, succeed in creating livable and sustainable environments. This is a new and dynamic way to look at the culture of sustainability. “Green building” is not only reflected in individual buildings; it is the accumulation of the buildings, the infrastructure, the urban planning and design, the amenities of the community and the lifestyles that communities live. Projects such as DIY Urbanism in the Netherlands by MVRDV and “e_co_llectiva” by Athanasios Polyzoidis & Katerina Petsiou have this kind of regard for the development of holistic community.

Read on for more after the break.

 

A growing number of designs features holistic approaches to building design and that includes the street and the plaza and the communty associated with it. More than that, urban developments have more frequently begun to incorporate a mix of programming: residential, commercial, retail and recreational working together. The system will rate each community according to livability, economic prosperity, environment, design, governance and innovation. The administration hopes that it will encourage better and more creative designs for communities with improved planning. It provides an incentive that up until now has only been awarded to individual buildings.

The GBCA is setting a precedent that will hopefully be followed by other Green Building Councils. It promotes a healthy competition for the best in planning for healthy communities, both for the residents and the environment.

Find more information here! 

via Design Build Source, “Green Star: Communities Rating System Released” by Emily D’Alterio

What We Liked This Week: 06/18

Dwelling in Etura‘ by Roberto Ercilla Arquitectura

We welcomed summer this week with a slew of great projects. We saw a lot of private houses and villas (but also some museums and schools) from all corners of the world, each of which look primed for summer. Nearly all of them have spectacular views, extravagant landscaping, and, best of all minimalist pools. We thought we’d count down our top five of the last few days, so dig in, make yourself a bowl of ice cream, and scroll away. Continue.

On we go to Etura, Spain to visit this striking concrete house. The project’s most formal feature is, of course, the cantilevered volume projecting over the hillside on which the home is delicately perched. On top there’s a surrealist lawn that stretches out into the lush landscape beyond–the perfect place to picnic on a warm, breezy summer day.

Kooyong Residence / Matt Gibson Architecture

@ SMG

Architects: Matt Gibson Architecture
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: SMG

@ SMG

The brief for the renovation of this boom style double fronted Victorian home in Armadale originally called for full demolition. However, upon witnessing the possibilities of the existing dwelling the client was encouraged to retain & restore the front section with the potential that it could enable the project as a whole to provoke a richer response when co-aligned with a newer intervention.

@ SMG

Given the depth of the site and a client request for sheltered outdoor space a decision was made to separate rather than attach the new works at the rear. This availed a strip of north facing external space between old & new ‘pavilions’. The placement and articulation of which was fundamental to injecting interest within the spatial experience of the home.

@ SMG

The end result follows a story of 2 ‘pavilions’ – at the front the restoration of the existing grander section of the Victorian building and at the rear a new contemporary double storey addition. Both are seemingly separate yet connected via a metaphorical bridge that traverses the courtyard area – acting as a powerful interstitial space mediating the two buildings and history . This glazed bridge transforms through the seasons. In the colder months it performs as an enclosed way and umbilical chord between the buildings. On warmer days it may open up to become external, helping to extend the floor plate of the courtyards for gatherings and sheltered outdoor dining . Doors at either end allow flexibility to open up or close down sections of the house as required. The courtyards also serve to the break up the house into 3 strong programmatic zones –existing structure as master quarters & Drawing room, newer ground floor for living quarters and children’s quarters upstairs.

Plans

Kooyong Residence / Matt Gibson Architecture (17) @ SMG
Kooyong Residence / Matt Gibson Architecture (1) @ SMG
Kooyong Residence / Matt Gibson Architecture (2) @ SMG
Kooyong Residence / Matt Gibson Architecture (3) @ SMG
Kooyong Residence / Matt Gibson Architecture (4) @ SMG
Kooyong Residence / Matt Gibson Architecture (5) @ SMG
Kooyong Residence / Matt Gibson Architecture (6) @ SMG
Kooyong Residence / Matt Gibson Architecture (7) @ SMG
Kooyong Residence / Matt Gibson Architecture (8) @ SMG
Kooyong Residence / Matt Gibson Architecture (9) @ SMG
Kooyong Residence / Matt Gibson Architecture (10) @ SMG
Kooyong Residence / Matt Gibson Architecture (11) @ SMG
Kooyong Residence / Matt Gibson Architecture (12) @ SMG
Kooyong Residence / Matt Gibson Architecture (13) @ SMG
Kooyong Residence / Matt Gibson Architecture (14) @ SMG
Kooyong Residence / Matt Gibson Architecture (15) @ SMG
Kooyong Residence / Matt Gibson Architecture (16) @ SMG
Kooyong Residence / Matt Gibson Architecture (18) @ SMG
Plan Plan

RIBA International Award Winners Announced

Auckland Art Gallery / Toi o Tamaki, Auckland, New Zealand FJMT + Archimedia – architects in association © Gollings

Following our previous announcement revealing the 2012 RIBA Award recipients, we now present to you 12 international projects that have also received top honors from RIBA. Buildings outside the European Union by RIBE Chartered Architects and RIBA International Fellows are eligible for this award. These 2012 RIBA International Award winners will now compete for the RIBA Lubetkin Prize – an award named in honor of the Georgia-born architect who worked in Paris before coming to London in the 1930s to establish the influential Tecton Group. In 2009, the RIBA Lubetkin Prize went to the National Stadium Beijing by Herzog & de Meuron with China Architectural Design & Research Group and Arup Sport for National Stadium Company.

And now, the 12 RIBA International Award winners are…

Clayton Campus – Monash University, Melbourne, / VN Architecture

Clayton Campus – Monash University, Melbourne, Australia / VN Architecture © John Gollings

Balsillie School of International Affairs, CIGI Campus, / Kuwabara Payne McKenna Blumberg Architects

Balsillie School of International Affairs, CIGI Campus, Canada / Kuwabara Payne McKenna Blumberg Architects © cMMezulis

Guangzhou International Finance Centre, Guangzhou, China / Wilkinson Eyre Architects

Guangzhou International Finance Centre, Guangzhou, China / Wilkinson Eyre Architects © Jonathan Leijonhufvud

Innhouse hotel Kunming, China / Integer Intelligent and Green

Innhouse hotel Kunming, China / Integer Intelligent and Green © Kerun Ip

Yotsuya Tenera, Tokyo, Japan / Key Operation Inc / Architects

Yotsuya Tenera, Tokyo, Japan / Key Operation Inc / Architects © Toshihiro Sobajima

One KL, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia / SCDA Architects

One KL, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia / SCDA Architects © Albert Lim

The Troika, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia / Foster + Partners

The Troika, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia / Foster + Partners © Aaron Pocock

Auckland Art Gallery / Toi o Tamaki, Auckland, New Zealand FJMT + Archimedia – architects in association

Auckland Art Gallery / Toi o Tamaki, Auckland, New Zealand FJMT + Archimedia – architects in association © Gollings

Solaris Fusionopolis 2B, One North, Singapore / TR Hamzah and Yeang

Solaris Fusionopolis 2B, One North, Singapore / TR Hamzah and Yeang © Albert Lim

Urban housing and crèche, Geneva, Switzerland / Sergison Bates Architects with Jean-Paul Jaccaud Architectes

Urban housing and crèche, Geneva, Switzerland / Sergison Bates Architects with Jean-Paul Jaccaud Architectes © Alain Grandchamp

Frick Chemistry Laboratory, Princeton University, USA / Hopkins Architects

Frick Chemistry Laboratory, Princeton University, USA / Hopkins Architects © Morley van Sternberg

Sperone Westwater, Bowery, New York City / Foster + Partners

Sperone Westwater, Bowery, New York City / Foster + Partners © Tom Powel

Scroll through the gallery to view more images of each building.

1_Monash_University_Student_Housing_Clayton_3 - John Gollings Clayton Campus – Monash University, Melbourne, Australia / VN Architecture © John Gollings
2_Monash_University_Student_Housing_Clayton_3 - John Gollings (2) Clayton Campus – Monash University, Melbourne, Australia / VN Architecture © John Gollings
3_CIGI-Entrance Canopy cMMezulis Balsillie School of International Affairs, CIGI Campus, Canada / Kuwabara Payne McKenna Blumberg Architects © cMMezulis
4_CIGI-Courtyard cMMezulis Balsillie School of International Affairs, CIGI Campus, Canada / Kuwabara Payne McKenna Blumberg Architects © cMMezulis
5-GIFC_02_Jonathan_Leijonhufvud Guangzhou International Finance Centre, Guangzhou, China / Wilkinson Eyre Architects © Jonathan Leijonhufvud
6-GIFC_11_Jonathan_Leijonhufvud Guangzhou International Finance Centre, Guangzhou, China / Wilkinson Eyre Architects © Jonathan Leijonhufvud
Image 7 - Kerun Ip Innhouse hotel Kunming, China / Integer Intelligent and Green © Kerun Ip
Image 8 - Kerun Ip Innhouse hotel Kunming, China / Integer Intelligent and Green © Kerun Ip
yotsuya tenera 10 - Toshihiro Sobajima Yotsuya Tenera, Tokyo, Japan / Key Operation Inc / Architects © Toshihiro Sobajima
yotsuya_tenera_11 - Toshihiro Sobajima Yotsuya Tenera, Tokyo, Japan / Key Operation Inc / Architects © Toshihiro Sobajima
12 - Albert Lim One KL, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia / SCDA Architects © Albert Lim
13 - Albert Lim One KL, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia / SCDA Architects © Albert Lim
14-1307_FP428316_indesign - Aaron Pocock The Troika, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia / Foster + Partners © Aaron Pocock
15-1307_FP428349_indesign - Aaron Pocock The Troika, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia / Foster + Partners © Aaron Pocock
16-Gollings Auckland Art Gallery / Toi o Tamaki, Auckland, New Zealand FJMT + Archimedia - architects in association © Gollings
17-Gollings Auckland Art Gallery / Toi o Tamaki, Auckland, New Zealand FJMT + Archimedia - architects in association © Gollings
19-atrium and solar shaft - Albert Lim Solaris Fusionopolis 2B, One North, Singapore / TR Hamzah and Yeang © Albert Lim
20-perspective view from road - Albert Lim Solaris Fusionopolis 2B, One North, Singapore / TR Hamzah and Yeang © Albert Lim
21-Urban Housing Alain Grandchamp 04 Urban housing and crèche, Geneva, Switzerland / Sergison Bates Architects with Jean-Paul Jaccaud Architectes © Alain Grandchamp
22 - Morley van Sternberg Frick Chemistry Laboratory, Princeton University, USA / Hopkins Architects © Morley van Sternberg
23Interior Morley van Sternberg Frick Chemistry Laboratory, Princeton University, USA / Hopkins Architects © Morley van Sternberg
24Bowery elevation_photo - Tom Powel Sperone Westwater, Bowery, New York City / Foster + Partners © Tom Powel
25Bowery view - Tom Powel Sperone Westwater, Bowery, New York City / Foster + Partners © Tom Powel
26City view by night - Tom Powel Sperone Westwater, Bowery, New York City / Foster + Partners © Tom Powel

Cloud House / McBride Charles Ryan

Courtesy of McBride Charles Ryan

Architects: McBride Charles Ryan
Location: VIC,
Design Team: Rob McBride, Debbie-Lyn Ryan, Marie Chen, Cathryn Panaterri, Ben Inman, Gabriella Muto
Proyect Year: 2012
Photographs: McBride Charles Ryan

Project Area: 220.0 m2
Extension Area: 70 sqm

Brief + Design

Courtesy of McBride Charles Ryan

The Cloud House is an addition and renovation to a double-fronted Edwardian house in Fitzroy North. Over the course of close to a century, this house has received several additions and modifications.

Courtesy of McBride Charles Ryan

McBride Charles Ryan’s work for the house is designed in three parts. This allows for a sequence of distinct and unexpected episodes, with glimpses previewing oncoming spaces and experiences as you move through the home.

Courtesy of McBride Charles Ryan

The street facade has been left to demonstrate the clients’ respect for the evolution of the character of the area and the modest street alteration belies the extent of the comprehensive internal renovation work. The spaces within the original structure are largely white in colour, united by exotic floral hallway carpet. This journey through the space is followed by encountering a disintegrated red-coloured ‘box’. This is the kitchen, at the heart of the property, which acts as a bridge linking the major spaces. A cloud-shaped extrusion is the unexpected final space. Following the form of a child-like impression of a cloud it is a playful addition where family and friends can eat and have fun surrounded by the curved form.

Section

The new living addition faces due south while allowing controlled north sun into the living area and providing effective cross ventilation. The form of the ‘cloud’ conforms to setback regulations without appearing obviously determined by them. The extrusion creates a dramatic interior language where walls merge seamlessly with the floor and ceiling. The craftsmanship is remarkable throughout; it has a sense of care one typically associates with the work of a cooper or wheelwright. While the geometry is playful, the extrusion is essentially a contemporary barrel vault. It is our hope that this cloud has a ‘silver lining’.

Cloud House / McBride Charles Ryan Courtesy of McBride Charles Ryan
Cloud House / McBride Charles Ryan Courtesy of McBride Charles Ryan
Cloud House / McBride Charles Ryan Courtesy of McBride Charles Ryan
Cloud House / McBride Charles Ryan Courtesy of McBride Charles Ryan
Cloud House / McBride Charles Ryan Courtesy of McBride Charles Ryan
Cloud House / McBride Charles Ryan Courtesy of McBride Charles Ryan
Cloud House / McBride Charles Ryan Courtesy of McBride Charles Ryan
Cloud House / McBride Charles Ryan Courtesy of McBride Charles Ryan
Cloud House / McBride Charles Ryan Courtesy of McBride Charles Ryan
Cloud House / McBride Charles Ryan Courtesy of McBride Charles Ryan
Cloud House / McBride Charles Ryan Courtesy of McBride Charles Ryan
Cloud House / McBride Charles Ryan Courtesy of McBride Charles Ryan
Cloud House / McBride Charles Ryan Courtesy of McBride Charles Ryan
Cloud House / McBride Charles Ryan Courtesy of McBride Charles Ryan
Cloud House / McBride Charles Ryan Courtesy of McBride Charles Ryan
Cloud House / McBride Charles Ryan Courtesy of McBride Charles Ryan
Cloud House / McBride Charles Ryan Section
Cloud House / McBride Charles Ryan Plan

Fig Tree Pocket House 2 / Shane Plazibat Architects

© Christopher Frederick Jones

Architects: Shane Plazibat Architects
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Project Team: Shane Plazibat, Daniel Sturton, Jindrich Hozak, Vincent Teo
Project Area: 2,000 sqm
Photographs: Christopher Frederick Jones

© Christopher Frederick Jones

The brief for the Fig Tree Pocket house requested a modern 2 storey family home, to be built on a sloping north facing bushland site, with easement lane access.

© Christopher Frederick Jones

The house is organised into 2 zones in section, carport, arrival and sleeping upstairs and living, pool and courtyard downstairs. An internal 2 storey linear bamboo garden traversing the length of the house along the east-west axis creates a reference point within the plan. The garden also allows for the creation of 1 room deep planning on both levels to enhance cross ventilation and access to daylight.

© Christopher Frederick Jones

On the upper level, arrival is via a semi enclosed entry garden which is adjacent to the 3 car carport. All 3 bedrooms on the upper level face due north. On axis with the entry is the main circulation stair with a 2 storey void which seperates the bedrooms from the childrens play room.

© Christopher Frederick Jones

On the lower level a separate single storey kitchen pavilion with adjacent outdoor terrace extends out to form the western edge of the courtyard. Timber doors slide back into cavities to help blur the edge between kitchen and garden. A pantry and study nook are located directly adjacent to the kitchen for ease of access and supervision. The pool is organized to the eastern edge of the plan which contributes to the spatial enclosure of the court.

The living/dining rooms, separate from the kitchen, are located as an extension of the courtyard in plan, with the space continuing through to the internal bamboo garden. Timber sliding doors either side of the living/dining room slide away to allow for heightened engagement with the garden/court to occur. A compact family room is located behind the living room.

The courtyard on the lower level creates a place and space for family events to occur with direct viewing and interaction available from the living/dining room, kitchen and pool. The raised terrace addressing the court allows for a continuous seat for occupants and visitors to observe the landscape setting.

© Christopher Frederick Jones

The house is anchored into the slope of the land in section.  This practice of using earth against building walls for external thermal mass helps reduce heat loss in winter and maintains a steady cool indoor air temperature to the lower level during summer. This design feature reduces the need for extra mechanical cooling or heating. The cutting in of the house into the slope also contributes to the landscape nature of the dwelling.

© Christopher Frederick Jones

The overhang of the upper level bedroom “box” is positioned to allow for the black slate tiles on the living room slab to heat up during winter with the diurnal lag releasing the embodied heat in the slab during the evening. In summer the slab is shaded. The internal 2 storey garden also facilitates enhanced cross ventilation via northerly breezes through the living room. In effect it acts like a chimney, drawing air through the room.

Plan

Fig Tree Pocket House 2 (20) © Christopher Frederick Jones
Fig Tree Pocket House 2 (19) © Christopher Frederick Jones
Fig Tree Pocket House 2 (18) © Christopher Frederick Jones
Fig Tree Pocket House 2 (17) © Christopher Frederick Jones
Fig Tree Pocket House 2 (16) © Christopher Frederick Jones
Fig Tree Pocket House 2 (15) © Christopher Frederick Jones
Fig Tree Pocket House 2 (14) © Christopher Frederick Jones
Fig Tree Pocket House 2 (13) © Christopher Frederick Jones
Fig Tree Pocket House 2 (12) © Christopher Frederick Jones
Fig Tree Pocket House 2 (11) © Christopher Frederick Jones
Fig Tree Pocket House 2 (10) © Christopher Frederick Jones
Fig Tree Pocket House 2 (9) © Christopher Frederick Jones
Fig Tree Pocket House 2 (8) © Christopher Frederick Jones
Fig Tree Pocket House 2 (7) © Christopher Frederick Jones
Fig Tree Pocket House 2 (6) © Christopher Frederick Jones
Fig Tree Pocket House 2 (5) © Christopher Frederick Jones
Fig Tree Pocket House 2 (4) © Christopher Frederick Jones
Plan Plan
Plan Plan
Section Section