Florida Researchers to develop virtual reality game using architecture to teach math to middle-school students

Florida State University College of Education’s Fengfeng Ke, an assistant professor in the Educational Psychology and Learning Systems department, is creating a computer game called Earthquake Rebuild that encourages creativity in design and uses architecture to teach geometry and other math skills. Ke and her team of fellow educators have been awarded a $549,937 National Science Foundation grant to support the creation of this game-based learning platform.

Over 150 Years of Architectural Photography in upcoming Getty exhibition

The long historical relationship between architecture and photography comes to focus once again in the Getty Center’s “In Focus: Architecture” exhibition beginning Oct. 15 until March 2, 2014.

Curated by Amanda Maddox, assistant curator of photographs at the J. Paul Getty Museum, “In Focus: Architecture” will look into the beginnings of architectural photography when 19th-century photographers documented historical sites and structures. As the cityscape modernized in the 20th century, so did architectural photography as inventive uses of the medium emerged — and continue to do so in contemporary times.

The upcoming exhibition will showcase more than 20 works from the Getty’s permanent collection including recently acquired photos from Andreas Feininger, Ryuji Miyamoto, and Peter Wegner.

Other additions to the exhibit are an accompanying book, “Architecture in Photographs,” with an essay by Gordon Baldwin and a lecture by Dietrich Neumann, Royce Family Professor of History of …

Jean-Claude Carrière Theatre / A+ Architecture

Architects: A+ Architecture
Location: Montpellier, France
Area: 2,620 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Jean-Yves Gilbert

From the architect. The president of the Conseil Général de l’Hérault and l’Assemblé départementale reinforced their commitment to the cultural sector. Considering the success of cultural events currently taking place at the domaine d’O, the present theatre (with a capacity of only 220 seats) has reached its limits.

Just like the similar project at the Comédie Française, the structure is entirely built out of wood panels (KLH). From the very beginning, the design has been designed taking the natural environment of the location into account : a construction which can be entirely dismantled, the use of wood, a light architectural expression, respecting the surrounding wooded zone. The building is entirely built of recyclable material, using for instance PECF labelled wood, providing an outstanding carbon footprint for this project.

The theatre is more than remarkable in terms of energy efficiency, including the innovative heating system, an excellent insulation system and the exclusive use of LED for the lightning systems. The acoustic insulation system has been optimized in order to avoid neighborhood sound pollution and to create perfect interior acoustic settings for the stage. Retractable seating solutions, a modular stage frame, a construction that can entirely be dismantled, optimized technical zones, a bright and welcoming hallway.

Jean-Claude Carrière Theatre / A+ Architecture © Jean-Yves Gilbert
Jean-Claude Carrière Theatre / A+ Architecture © Jean-Yves Gilbert
Jean-Claude Carrière Theatre / A+ Architecture © Jean-Yves Gilbert
Jean-Claude Carrière Theatre / A+ Architecture © Jean-Yves Gilbert
Jean-Claude Carrière Theatre / A+ Architecture © Jean-Yves Gilbert
Jean-Claude Carrière Theatre / A+ Architecture © Jean-Yves Gilbert
Jean-Claude Carrière Theatre / A+ Architecture © Jean-Yves Gilbert
Jean-Claude Carrière Theatre / A+ Architecture © Jean-Yves Gilbert
Jean-Claude Carrière Theatre / A+ Architecture © Jean-Yves Gilbert
Jean-Claude Carrière Theatre / A+ Architecture © Jean-Yves Gilbert
Jean-Claude Carrière Theatre / A+ Architecture © Jean-Yves Gilbert
Jean-Claude Carrière Theatre / A+ Architecture Diagram
Jean-Claude Carrière Theatre / A+ Architecture Elevation
Jean-Claude Carrière Theatre / A+ Architecture Elevation
Jean-Claude Carrière Theatre / A+ Architecture Elevation

Jean-Claude Carrière Theatre / A+ Architecture originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 30 Sep 2013.

send to Twitter | Share on Facebook | What do you think about this?

last week, Olly Wainwright investigates the fortunes of other Stirling Prize winners - finding that in many cases critical acclaim and awards do not necessarily translate to long term success. His study brings into question what qualities should be awarded, and seems to imply that there should be a greater focus on post-occupancy awards, such as the 10-year award started by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat’s (CTBUH) this year, and another being considered by the RIBA. You can read Wainwright's full investigation here.

Sigue leyendo '>

RIBA Stirling Prize Winners: How Prize-Worthy Are They?

With Astley Castle winning this year’s Stirling Prize last week, Olly Wainwright investigates the fortunes of other Stirling Prize winners – finding that in many cases critical acclaim and awards do not necessarily translate to long term success. His study brings into question what qualities should be awarded, and seems to imply that there should be a greater focus on post-occupancy awards, such as the 10-year award started by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat’s (CTBUH) this year, and another being considered by the RIBA. You can read Wainwright’s full investigation here.

RIBA Stirling Prize Winners: How Prize-Worthy Are They? originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 30 Sep 2013.

send to Twitter | Share on Facebook | What do you think about this?

Manzanita House by Klopf Architecture

The owners of this semi-rural lot wanted a home that related to its natural setting with an open, light-filled plan that utilized sustainable materials.

Custom Mid Century Modern Remodel by Klopf Architecture

Klopf Architecture’s goal was to create a harmonious center space for family and friends in an Eichler style home of Mid-Century vintage balancing minimalism and modernism.

Eichler Bedroom Wing Remodel by Klopf Architecture

The intent to modernize and brighten a dark and dingy Eichler.

Winners of 2013 RIBA Manser Medal and Stephen Lawrence Prize

Also presented with institute honors that night were two projects which represent the UK’s most excellent small projects: the 2013 Manser Medal for the best new home went to Slip House by Carl Turner Architects, and the 2013 Stephen Lawrence Prize in recognition of fresh talent and smaller construction budgets went to Montpelier Community Nursery by AY Architects.

Previously:

Shortlist for the 2013 RIBA Manser Medal highlights the UK’s best new homes

Six houses shortlisted for RIBA Stephen Lawrence Prize 2013

Family House In Pereda / Zwei Estudio Creativo

Architects: Zwei Estudio Creativo
Location: Pereda, Mieres del Camino, Asturias, Spain
Architect In Charge: Talía Fernández Fernández, Andrea Fernández Fernández
Director Of Works: Daniel Izquierdo García
Technical Project Manager: Talía Fernández Fernández, Andrea Fernández Fernández
Area: 522.0 sqm
Year: 2011
Photographs: Javier Granda

Construction Company: Construcciones y Proyectos Corporativos
Geotechnical Study: Geotecnia Alperi
Geothermal Energy And Under Floor Heating: Asturcántabro instalaciones

From the architect. A young couple and a privileged parcel in the middle of a rural core mark the starting points of this project.The beginning of this project goes through a complex analysis of the environment, starting with the surroundings directly affected by the town planning regulations and subsequently advancing to the surrounding environment, of which several singularities are valued. This analysis forces the stakeout of the existing limitations in the current regulations, with a preservative character and that determine completely the final shape of the housing. Therefore, a first decision in the project was ‘to quarantine’ several considerations of the legislation that didn’t seem to take into account the place. Nay its restrictions seemed to give way to a ‘non-place’, formulating answers based on the past to the present environment that, at the same time, turns empty and devoid of identity, an identity that, however, is recognized in the unbuilt surroundings.

Several considerations to which the own place is responding are joined to this starting point: orientations, relations with the nearby surroundings through linking spaces, the relation with the farther environment, integrating landscape contributions provided by the valley by including them as reflections in the facade,… With a simple composition of square volumes, of full and empty spaces, of transparencies and blind panels, of sequences and facade rhythms, of reflections and contrasts,… the house is responding sensitively to the site with an identity, with its own personality and according to the place it belongs.

In parallel, the need of energetic efficiency and sustainability is marked as one of the strengths of the project, trying to go one step ahead of the current legislation. Again limited by legal conditions, seriation, prefabrication and industrialization are discarded, using resources provided by the surroundings and by the very design of the spaces. The development line considers a project that optimizes bioclimatic/passive resources and that is able to be articulated clearly in the existing plot, organizing formally the building in volumes that groups functions according to their use.

Wood, stone block, working with thermal lag in walls, solutions that maximizes the use of the greenhouse effect, the reinterpretation of “trombre” wall, … are some of the concepts we try to work in this project to develop a passive sustainability so, the house, through its final design, has thermo regulating capacity being able to retain heat in winter and to dissipate it in summer through the use of different resources and passive conditioning systems. Accordingly, the house should achieve its thermal comfort consuming as little energy as possible. As active energy response we choose to use a renewable energy covering 100% of the energy demand for hot water, heating and cooling, compared to the minimum standards imposed by the regulations.

Family House In Pereda / Zwei Estudio Creativo © Javier Granda
Family House In Pereda / Zwei Estudio Creativo © Javier Granda
Family House In Pereda / Zwei Estudio Creativo © Javier Granda
Family House In Pereda / Zwei Estudio Creativo © Javier Granda
Family House In Pereda / Zwei Estudio Creativo © Javier Granda
Family House In Pereda / Zwei Estudio Creativo © Javier Granda
Family House In Pereda / Zwei Estudio Creativo © Javier Granda
Family House In Pereda / Zwei Estudio Creativo © Javier Granda
Family House In Pereda / Zwei Estudio Creativo © Javier Granda
Family House In Pereda / Zwei Estudio Creativo © Javier Granda
Family House In Pereda / Zwei Estudio Creativo Basament Floor Plan
Family House In Pereda / Zwei Estudio Creativo Site Plan
Family House In Pereda / Zwei Estudio Creativo Site Plan
Family House In Pereda / Zwei Estudio Creativo Elevation
Family House In Pereda / Zwei Estudio Creativo Detail
Family House In Pereda / Zwei Estudio Creativo Detail
Family House In Pereda / Zwei Estudio Creativo Plan
Family House In Pereda / Zwei Estudio Creativo Section
Family House In Pereda / Zwei Estudio Creativo Plan

Family House In Pereda / Zwei Estudio Creativo originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 30 Sep 2013.

send to Twitter | Share on Facebook | What do you think about this?

Are Dining Rooms Becoming Obsolete?

formal dining room 1 Are Dining Rooms Becoming Obsolete?

It’s a question that begs to be answered and worth delving into. In order to best answer this question we need to take a look at today’s modern families and their lifestyles. We are busier than ever before. Our days are longer than in the past. Today’s school children have longer days  with more activities and more homework, perhaps, than those of previous generations. The greatest difference may be that today’s homes consist of, primarily, two working parents/partners.

Gone are the days where the mother stayed home and tended to the house and greeted her husband and children when they came home at the end of the day. Gone are the days when the workday ended at 5:00pm. Today’s family members come and go at various times and into the late evening hours. Because of this it is not uncommon to have a staggered family meal, depending on what time everyone gets home. For those who do sit down and plan a family meal, this can take a great amount of coordination and effort and, does not often happen 7 days a week. What does this have to do with the dining room? A great deal!

dining room Are Dining Rooms Becoming Obsolete?

How often is the dining room used?

Our lifestyles tend to be more casual today, and our homes are a direct reflection of this shift. Older homes, those built between 1920 and 1970s, with the smaller kitchen were outfitted with dining rooms just off the kitchen. Food was prepared in the kitchen and then transported into the dining room. Once a meal was finished, people would then relocate to another room… to the kitchen, perhaps, to clean and do the dishes, or to the common living area or to a bedroom.

Dining rooms, once used daily are not seeing much use at all these days. Some use them from time to time while others not at all. Whether a dining room is used or not really comes down to lifestyle. Very few of these rooms are used on a daily basis. Many are used for entertaining or for family gatherings and holiday meals. Some use this room but just once or twice a year.

formal dining room eat in kitchen Are Dining Rooms Becoming Obsolete?

Where are people dining?

Our kitchens see more traffic and more use, perhaps, than any other room in the house. This is especially the case with busy families. The kitchen has become central not only in our homes, but in our home life. We are spending more and more time in the kitchen. It is where we cook, congregate, work, entertain, discuss the day’s events, plan future engagements and pay bills. We also happen to eat in here. Our kitchens are outfitted with music and television sets and this space has become a true living room. Today’s kitchens are larger than those of years past and often have more than one seating area.  It is not uncommon to see both an island surrounded with chairs and a separate space large enough to fit a table and several chairs. With two eating areas is there really a need for another?

 Are Dining Rooms Becoming Obsolete?

What’s happening to existing dining rooms?

Many  formal dining rooms are sitting vacant, empty – gathering dust and cobwebs. Others, however, aware of this grand wasted space and have decided to turn these unused rooms into something that better fits their lifestyle. These unused dining rooms are being converted to accommodate today’s lifestyle. We are seeing them become dens, playrooms, offices, libraries,. craft rooms, art studios, exercise rooms…

formal dining room 3 Are Dining Rooms Becoming Obsolete?

The walls are coming down!

Expanded spaces and open floor plans are very much in demand these days. Newer homes are built with this thought in mind, and older homes are being reconfigured and redeveloped so that they too can have this open feel. Even small Colonial and Cape style houses can have an open floor plan. As long as weight is redistributed properly, load-bearing walls can easily be removed. For many this is ideal. Not only does this open up the home, making it feel larger, but for those with young families, some feel it’s easier to keep tabs on everyone without having to be in the same room. Homes with open floor plans are hot commodities in the real estate market, in fact, Realtors often promote their listings as having an “open floor plan” to create interest among buyers. This isn’t, however, the case for every home.

formal dining room 7 Are Dining Rooms Becoming Obsolete?

Open floor plan vs separate, traditional dining room

Which is more desirable, the newer, open floor plan or the more traditional, dining room? There is no right or wrong answer here and people seem to be equally divided here. Some prefer the modern look and feel of a more open floor plan while others prefer the traditional setup with separate living areas. As with everything, the beauty here, too, is in the eye of the beholder. It comes down to family, living and lifestyle and perhaps even tradition.

Those who grew up with traditional dining rooms, with memories of great holiday meals, loud, boisterous and energetic family get togethers may want to continue with tradition and pass this down to future generations. While some view these rooms as a waste of valuable space, others prefer to hang tight to these rooms, even if they are only used a handful of times a year. It’s about preference, lifestyle and choice. In an informal poll, about half the people responded to preferring a separate, closed off dining room with the other half preferring a specified dining space, but not  in a separate, closed off space.

formal dining area 5 Are Dining Rooms Becoming Obsolete?

Dining areas in smaller homes and apartments

Many Americans and most Europeans live in homes and apartments too small for separate dining areas. For those residing in apartments, lofts and smaller homes, the kitchen is, once again, the center of the home for entertaining as well as dining purposes. In lofts with open floor plans, large farm tables are often central to the space. Much in the same way a kitchen table has become multi-functional, these have as well, providing hours of family meals, and entertainment as well as a place for homework, crafts and board games.

office bedrooms Are Dining Rooms Becoming Obsolete?

The family dynamic is changing

With the rising costs of living and a poor economy, many young people cannot afford to live on their home. It is becoming more and more common for today’s youth, after finishing university, to move back home while they look for work and to try to save a little money. In addition to this, as our population ages and is living longer, many elders are moving in with their children as well, making many homes multi-generational and redefining the term modern family. For these families more living space is therefore needed as opposed to the need for a separate dining area.

formal dining area converting space Are Dining Rooms Becoming Obsolete?

In conclusion

Whether or not a formal dining room is wanted or needed depends a great deal on tradition, lifestyle as well as size of the home. Those who view the space to be antiquated and unnecessary opting to turn these spaces into offices, bedrooms and libraries. Some, however, are choosing to have a room that is multi functional – a room that can best be served for different purposes – a room that could be converted from office or library to dining area, and if designed properly, this conversion is easily done. Maximizing the use of a home’s square footage is most important all around.

You’re reading Are Dining Rooms Becoming Obsolete? originally posted on Freshome.

The post Are Dining Rooms Becoming Obsolete? appeared first on Freshome.com.