Sky City, world’s tallest building, stops construction due to lack of government approval

Yin Zhi, head of Beijing Tsinghua Urban Design Institute, said, “The technique that Broad Group uses has no precedent in the world, and the cost they promised is very low. So they either have some record breaking techniques or it’s a lie. They are gambling. If they win, they will change the history of world architecture, but that’s one chance in a million.”

In China’s Hunan province, ground was broken for the next “world’s tallest skyscraper”. It was a brave ambition. The developer Broad Group planned to build an 838 meter tower with 202 stories, in just 10 months. The tower would surpass the current tallest skyscraper, Dubai’s Burj Khalifa by 10 meters. But the project has been halted over questions concerning feasibility and government permission.

Departamentos en el barrio de Bon Pastor – SV Arquitectura

Departamentos en el barrio de Bon Pastor - SV Arquitectura

Las 65 viviendas se han distribuido en dos cuerpos de PB+4 que cierran el conjunto.
El aparcamiento, de 2 plantas, ocupa la totalidad del la superficie bajo rasante del solar.
Las plantas 1, 2, 3, i 4 son idénticas: 6 núcleos de comunicaciones verticales que ventilan hacia el patio interior que permiten el acceso a 14 viviendas por planta, en agrupaciones de 2 o 3 viviendas por rellano.

Departamentos en el barrio de Bon Pastor - SV Arquitectura

En cada planta encontramos 2 viviendas de 2 y 4 dormitorios y 10 de 3. En planta baja se completa el programa solicitado mediante la disposición de 9 viviendas. El resto de superficie se destina a 6 vestíbulos de doble acceso (calle y patio) y la rampa de acceso del aparcamiento.

Departamentos en el barrio de Bon Pastor - SV Arquitectura

Excepto la tipología en esquina, la viviendas están distribuidas con los dormitorios en fachada de calle y las salas, cocinas y terrazas en fachada de patio. Esta decisión responde a la posibilidad de apertura y domesticación que ofrece el patio. En el interior de las viviendas se ha racionalizado la situación de los núcleos y servicios de instalaciones, compactando las unidades de cocina, baño y lavadero.

Departamentos en el barrio de Bon Pastor - SV Arquitectura

Arquitectos: SV Arquitectura
Año de la Obra:2010
Área construida:10887 m²
Ubicación: Barcelona, España
Equipo: Santiago Vives Sanfeliu, Cecilia Obiol
Constructora: GMK associats, S.L.
Cálculo de instalaciones: PROISOTEC S.L.P.
Dirección de ejecución: GPO Ingeniería, S.A.

Departamentos en el barrio de Bon Pastor - SV Arquitectura

Departamentos en el barrio de Bon Pastor - SV Arquitectura

Departamentos en el barrio de Bon Pastor - SV Arquitectura



House RP – Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani

Architects: Gonzalo Mardones Viviani
Location: Valle Escondido, Lo Barnechea, Santiago, Chile
Year: 2013
Photographs: Nico Saieh

Builder: Salvador Errázuriz
Landscape Gardener: Adriana Errázuriz
Lighting: Paulina Sir
Windows: Tecma
Kitchen: Poggenpohl
Closets And Bathroom Furniture: Xilofor

From the architect. The house for Marcelo Rios and his family comes from the order of this former tennis player, also former World No. 1. It’s located in Valle Escondido, a place enclosed on the foothills of Santiago de Chile within a stunning natural environment and a privileged view to the hills and the golf course.

The house places at middle levels, adapting to the slope. Also, it’s half-buried in order to appreciate and see the magnificent natural scenery from the access road. The roofs, themes from the distance, were enabled as an expanding large terrace: a place to stay, to enjoy the views, the environment and sunshine. The continuous roofs to the terrace surface were designed with natural vegetation and grass, but Marcelo, like every time he visited Wimbledon says that “The grass is for cows” so we decided to implement a roof with synthetic grass. The artificial grass was installed on rafters, which allowed generating an air bed that protects the cover from direct sunlight, preventing from overheating and affecting the air conditioning inside the house.

The entrance hall acts like a kneecap that relates and distributes the different levels generating inside a sum of continuous merged spaces seeking the views to the garden, the golf course, the remote landscape and natural light. The house was designed with two opposite faces: one closed to the street with walls containing internal circulations bathed in zenithal lighting and courtyards, and a second face completely open to the terraces, the garden and views protected from the sunlight with wide eaves and beams.

We chose to use just one material, the exposed concrete, adding titanium dioxide to the concrete in order to whiten it. Recently, nanotechnology studies have shown that titanium dioxide added to the concrete helps eliminating toxic gases produced by cars, like trees do.  (Although that was not our aim but whitening the concrete, but we believe that if it’s true, is good news). Every wall, opening, window, window sill, etc, has been faceted with a 12 cm module obtained from the measure of the phenolic sheets.

The use of the subsoil, what we call the sixth façade, is present in rooms that open, ventilate and illuminate through courtyards and the extension of the foundation to the terrace. The subsoil houses a games room, a trophy room and a cinema.

The whole interior is white in order to enhance the brightness in the house. As the white color makes the light bounce, this is strained and controlled through courtyards and side zenithal openings. The floor and skirting boards help with the idea of white in the interior. For that, bone color ceramic tiles in format 120 x 60 cm have been used. Large windows are made of aluminium, helping with the monochromatic white image of the house.

The garden was designed as a raised platform over the golf course, where it is possible to see it but not to be exposed to it.

House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nico Saieh
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nico Saieh
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nico Saieh
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nico Saieh
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nico Saieh
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nico Saieh
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nico Saieh
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nico Saieh
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nico Saieh
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nico Saieh
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nico Saieh
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nico Saieh
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nico Saieh
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nico Saieh
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nico Saieh
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nico Saieh
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nico Saieh
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nico Saieh
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nico Saieh
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nico Saieh
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nico Saieh
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nico Saieh
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nico Saieh
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nico Saieh
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nico Saieh
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nico Saieh
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nico Saieh
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nico Saieh
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nico Saieh
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani © Nico Saieh
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani First Floor Plan
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani Second Floor Plan
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani Roof Floor Plan
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani Undergorund Floor Plan
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani East Elevation
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani North Elevation
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani South Elevation
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani West Elevation
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani Section
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani Section
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani Section
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani Section
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani Section
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani Section
House RP - Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani Section

House RP – Marcelo Rios / Gonzalo Mardones Viviani originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 31 Jul 2013.

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Win a Moleskine® notebook from the Inspiration and Process in Architecture collection!

The foundation of architecture lies in the creative process. And for many architects, the beginning of that process involves none other than simple pencil and paper for jotting down those ideas, notes, and sketches to inspire the next project.

Inspiration and Process in Architecture, published by Moleskine

London’s Olympic Legacy Called into Question

After a government report earlier this month found that the London Olympics had brought a £10-billion-boost to the UK’s economy – effectively breaking even with the initial investment after just one year – the architectural community has begun to question whether the built legacy of the games will be worthwhile in the long run.

Guardian critic Olly Wainwright is scathing about the Olympic park, particularly the developments at the edge of the site: “At every junction of this roaring A-road sprouts a steroidal tower, each clad in ever more lurid colours, transforming the street into a gauntlet of competing ambitions. Looming over adjacent council estates, these brash totems are a monument to Olympian greed… Strip away all the festive colours, though, and you’ll find that these are actually mean-minded silos of tightly packed one-bedroom flats, mostly sold overseas for buy-to-let.”

Find out more about Wainwright’s investigations, and other opinions of the Olympic legacy, after the break.

Although Wainwright is also critical of East Village, the housing area within the park (“There’s little sense of human scale”), he does spout positive about Kathryn Firth and Eleanor Fawcett, calling the two architects in charge of design for the London Legacy Development Corporation (LLDC) a “convincing duo”. The pair are aiming to reconnect the Olympic Park to the surrounding area and develop neighborhoods which have more in common with the rest of East London:

“They bring a welcome voice of sanity after a disastrous failure of planning intelligence about how to make a coherent place out of this ragbag of parts,” he compliments, but warns “while their words and drawings may be reassuring, there is still precious little evidence that their hopes will come to fruition.”

Elsewhere, BDOnline has sought the opinion of two experts with differing views: Director of Oppidan Design Sowmya Parthasarathy praises the fact that “two hundred hectares of land has been cleaned and freed from a tangle of pylons, pipelines and scrapyards. More than 30 new bridges and under-passes have repaired a fragmented Lower Lea Valley.”

Parthasarathy goes on: ”While the visible icons of legacy are impressive, more modest projects in the wider area, propelled by the Games, have arguably been even more successful.”

On the other side of the argument is Michael Edwards, Senior lecturer in the economics of planning at the Bartlett. He argues that London’s Olympic bid, won in the economic boom but implemented during the recession, means that “the legacy is thus scarcely detectable in the flood of destructive social change.”

He points out that the UK government’s austerity-based economics meant that “ambitions for affordable housing were scuppered by pressure to reduce public borrowing”.

However, he does concede that the Olympics were a lifeline to the construction industry during the worst years of the recession: “in the event, the Games kept builders and designers afloat through years which would have been bleak”.

London's Olympic Legacy Called into Question originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 31 Jul 2013.

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Family Box / Crossboundaries Architects

Architects: Crossboundaries Architects
Location: Beijing, China
Architect: Crossboundaries Architects
Collaborating Architects & Engineers: BIAD International Studio & BIAD TSH International Studio
Client: Children Enterprise (UK) Limited
Area: 2,300 sqm
Year: 2011
Photographs: Chaoying Yang

From the architect. “We have learned that to raise a happy, healthy and hopeful child, it takes a family, it takes teachers, it takes clergy, it takes business people, it takes community leaders, it takes those who protect our health and safety, it takes all of us. Yes, it takes a village to raise a child.”  – Hillary Clinton 

Family Box functions both as an indoor playground and a kindergarten for children up to twelve years old, while accomodating their parents’ needs. It hosts different kinds of activities – from swimming, playing games to various classes ranging from music, dancing, crafting to cooking. Furthermore, it has a big play area, a reading area and a generous café area. Located at the outer corner of a park it is placed in a natural environment, which enhances the visibility of the building. 

The different size and height between adult and child and their different angle of view was the starting point for considering Family Box should be made by two types of spaces: a kids-scale space and an adult-scale space. How to find an inspiring balance between them? How to combine the different needs? 

Despite the complex program another challenging part of this project was to deal with an existing structural system, column grid and also the building footprint – due to a different original function of the building and the involvement of another design institute in an earlier project stage. The rigid concrete structure of the building did not seem the most suitable for the design purpose, that was counterbalanced in different ways. Since the two upper floors where not yet constructed, floor plates were shifted up and down and cut outs in the floor allowed views between the two floors. 

The use of independent rooms in the shape of free-standing boxes allows the activities to run parallel and it offers the most suitable environment for each. The rooms have their own program or theme, they all differ from the outside space in terms of color and furniture. They have their own story and inside life and allow the children to concentrate on the program offered. At the same time, small square window openings allows maintaining contact with the outside, and parents can have a peep inside to see what is going on.

The box locations are meant to break the rigid layout of the concrete columns, which is also camouflaged with a series of arches that give a different rhythm to the environment.  Visually, the common areas are treated with low contrast finishes in order to enhance and balance the space and equipments for the children.

The glass façade is wrapping all of the functions like a skin, following the given building perimeter. It has a printed pattern, which was developed out of simple single-line drawings made by children. They were modified into a pattern consisting of two different sized squares, the graphic motif is reversed: the background is white-translucent and the drawing is transparent. From far away the objects on the facade are recognizable, they indicate a building function related to children, fun and recreation.

Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects © Chaoying Yang
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects © Chaoying Yang
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects © Chaoying Yang
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects © Chaoying Yang
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects © Chaoying Yang
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects © Chaoying Yang
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects © Chaoying Yang
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects © Chaoying Yang
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects © Chaoying Yang
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects © Chaoying Yang
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects © Chaoying Yang
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects © Chaoying Yang
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects © Chaoying Yang
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects © Chaoying Yang
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects © Chaoying Yang
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects © Chaoying Yang
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects © Chaoying Yang
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects © Chaoying Yang
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects © Chaoying Yang
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects © Chaoying Yang
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects © Chaoying Yang
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects © Chaoying Yang
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects © Chaoying Yang
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects © Chaoying Yang
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects © Chaoying Yang
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects © Chaoying Yang
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects © Chaoying Yang
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects © Chaoying Yang
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects © Chaoying Yang
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects © Chaoying Yang
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects © Chaoying Yang
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects © Chaoying Yang
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects Facade Pattern
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects Society Diagram
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects Building Diagram
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects Children Diagram
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects Site Plan
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects Concept Diagram
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects Plan Phase 1 & 2
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects Plan Phase 1 Basement
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects 2nd Floor Plan Phase 1
Family Box  / Crossboundaries Architects Bookstore Diagram

Family Box / Crossboundaries Architects originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 31 Jul 2013.

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Corbu’s corpus: A review of MoMA’s ongoing Le Corbusier exhibit

by Ross Wolfe and Sammy Medina

Jean-Louis Cohen with Barry Bergdoll.
15 June-23 September 2013.
Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Originally published by the radical geography journal

Cambridge University Library Landscape Design Competition

The University of Cambridge Library, with the Department of Architecture, recently launched a landscape design competition to transform the space surrounding Cambridge University Library. Open to professionals and non-professionals alike, they are looking for bold submissions that reimagine the open spaces and environment of the iconic Giles Gilbert Scott building. A monumental presence both within the University and the city, entries to the competition will be judged on their innovative interpretation of the site, its context, use and history – as well as their ability to integrate contemporary ecological research. Entries should also promote new visibility for the Library and encourage people to think about the role of the site on the western edge of the city. The registration deadline is September 30, and the deadline for submissions is November 30. For more information, please visit here.

Cambridge University Library Landscape Design Competition originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 31 Jul 2013.

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Do We Need Fewer Architects?

In an article by the Architects’ Journal, Tony Fretton is quoted as saying there ought to be fewer architecture schools in the UK, with more difficult entry requirements and a higher failure rate. “There should be a shortage of architects in the UK,” he says, “fewer bad architects, fewer good architects”.

Citing Switzerland and the Netherlands as countries which do well with just 2 or 3 major architecture schools, he believes that architectural education should be concentrated into just a few schools in order to give students more access to the best tutors.

Read more about Fretton’s proposal after the break

Fretton’s argument is particularly relevant in the UK right now, as the Architects Registration Board (ARB) is considering a radical change to the process of architectural education. In a separate opinion piece, the AJ’s editor Christine Murray says that “the current system is flabby, and, at £9,000 a year for tuition fees, flabby isn’t fair.”

She points out that the current education system leaves little opportunity for graduates saying that “too many of these students are simply unemployable.” This would certainly seem to support Fretton’s argument that we should be producing fewer architecture graduates in the first place.

However, it is interesting to note that in many developing countries, such as Thailand, there is a severe shortage of architecture graduates, as revealed by this article in The Nation. Perhaps one response to the current crisis in UK architectural education is to better prepare graduates to find work abroad (and, judging by the popularity of our post “The 9 Best Countries for Architects to Find Work,” many graduates are already making this leap).

Should there be fewer architects? More architects abroad? Let us know what you think in the comments below…

Do We Need Fewer Architects? originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 31 Jul 2013.

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In Progress: Zhang ZhiDong and Modern Industrial Museum / Studio Daniel Libeskind

Architects: Studio Daniel Libeskind
Location: Wuhan, China
Architect Of Record: Zhong Nan Design Institute
Contractor: G.C Wisco Construction
Area: 7,240 sqm
Photographs: Studio Daniel Libeskind

From the architect. Zhang Zhidong was a 19th century leader in government who inspired the move towards modernization that established the steel industry in Wuhan. He also was responsible for city planning with industrial, cultural and financial districts that compose the contemporary city of Wuhan.

The steel industry in Wuhan was a model for China and the world. At the turn of the 20th century Wuhan was at the center of the nation connected by railroads to all the provinces of China. The story of the city of Wuhan is narrated by its aspirations for the future inspired by the unique history of the past. The Xinhai Revolution, in October, 1911, was a remarkable moment in that crystallized the modernization started by Zhang Zhidong and carried forward by modern industry.

The Zhang Zhidong and Modern Industrial Museum, in Wuhan, was designed to balance three narrative themes within an integrated building and landscape. Each of the three floors of the museum is committed to one theme; Zhang Zhidong, industry, and the city of Wuhan. The highest peak of the museum has a view toward the city. The museum floors look toward the garden which is composed of radiating lines and rings to connect past and future. The museum floors and the garden are united by the spherical geometry of the building form. The project is currently under construction.

In Progress: Zhang ZhiDong And Modern Industrial Museum / Studio Daniel Libeskind © Studio Daniel Libeskind
In Progress: Zhang ZhiDong And Modern Industrial Museum / Studio Daniel Libeskind © Studio Daniel Libeskind
In Progress: Zhang ZhiDong And Modern Industrial Museum / Studio Daniel Libeskind © Studio Daniel Libeskind
In Progress: Zhang ZhiDong And Modern Industrial Museum / Studio Daniel Libeskind © Studio Daniel Libeskind
In Progress: Zhang ZhiDong And Modern Industrial Museum / Studio Daniel Libeskind © Studio Daniel Libeskind
In Progress: Zhang ZhiDong And Modern Industrial Museum / Studio Daniel Libeskind © Studio Daniel Libeskind
In Progress: Zhang ZhiDong And Modern Industrial Museum / Studio Daniel Libeskind © Studio Daniel Libeskind
In Progress: Zhang ZhiDong And Modern Industrial Museum / Studio Daniel Libeskind © Studio Daniel Libeskind
In Progress: Zhang ZhiDong And Modern Industrial Museum / Studio Daniel Libeskind © Studio Daniel Libeskind
In Progress: Zhang ZhiDong And Modern Industrial Museum / Studio Daniel Libeskind © Studio Daniel Libeskind
In Progress: Zhang ZhiDong And Modern Industrial Museum / Studio Daniel Libeskind © Studio Daniel Libeskind
In Progress: Zhang ZhiDong And Modern Industrial Museum / Studio Daniel Libeskind Sketch

In Progress: Zhang ZhiDong and Modern Industrial Museum / Studio Daniel Libeskind originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 31 Jul 2013.

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