Cyberpocalypse at Brickworld 2013

“We hoped the canals would simply make it easier to move around the city, for civilians and police but the reality is Water Level is one giant port of entry for whoever has the cash.”
– Yoko Aramaki, City Planner

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Chambers Eat + Drink / Mr. Important Design

Chambers Eat + Drink / Mr. Important Design © Jeff Dow

Architects: Mr. Important Design
Location: San Francisco, CA, USA
Design Team: Charles Doell, Principal and Gui Bez
Area: 50 sqm
Year: 2011
Photographs: Jeff Dow

Client: Joie de Vivre Hotels
Main Contractor: Mills General

Circuit of The Americas / Miró Rivera Architects

Circuit of The Americas / Miró Rivera Architects © Paul Finkel | Piston Design

Architects: Miró Rivera Architects
Location: Austin, TX, USA
Year: 2013
Photographs: Paul Finkel | Piston Design, Circuit of the Americas, Tomas Segura, Ted Parker, Jr. | Circuit of the Americas, Steve Colburn, Courtesy of Miró Rivera Architects, Dorna Sports, Michael Hsu | Miró Rivera Architects

Austin-based Miró Rivera Architects are the designers of the signature buildings at the Circuit of The Americas, the first purpose-built Formula 1 Grand Prix™ facility in the United States. The architectural features of this new world-class motorsports and entertainment venue include a 251-foot tall Observation Tower, the Grand Plaza, the 6,500-seat Austin360 Amphitheater, the MainGrandstand, ticketing buildings,concession areas and two bridges over the track. As the designers of the main public spaces and buildings around the 3.4-mile track, Miró Rivera Architects are responsible for the aesthetic and much of the experiential qualities of the site.

The main architectural language of the facility evokes the precision, dynamism and performance-driven design of racecars. It is also visually stimulating, incorporating banners, billboards, and bold graphics. The architects bring their innovative approach to the structural systems: rather than being concealed behind a building’s façade they are articulated and become significant parts of the design. An architectural theme reoccurring throughout the site is the use of red steel tubes. The tubes cascade down the side of the Observation Tower to form a canopy for the Amphitheater stage and also frame the Main Grandstand. Evocative of sports cars and movement, this element ties the structures together creating a consistent visual experience.

The Observation Tower serves as the centerpiece of the complex, which rises over the racetrack offering sweeping views of the entire venue, downtown Austin, and the nearby Hill Country. The tower, a dramatic backdrop to the Amphitheater, provides a visual end to the Grand Plaza and also serves as a reference point for spectators throughout the site. Its observation platform at the top can hold up to 75 people and features glass railings and a glass floor.

Austin360 Amphitheater is a 6,761-seat amphitheater and is the largest outdoor amphitheater in Central Texas, with total spectator capacity of 15,000 people.

The amphitheater, carved into the center of the Circuit of America’s Grand Plaza, will be used for large-scale music and entertainment events. Spectators will enter the amphitheater at the back of the lawn and descend toward the stage passing two tiers of fixed seating with a capacity of 5,233. The front center section with fixed seating and premium views of the stage are occupied by nine rows of box seats. The floor seating area gives the venue the flexibility to host a variety of events with options for an additional 1,528 temporary seats, banquet tables, or standing room areas. The stage itself is located at the base of the observation tower whose red steel tubes start at the top of the 251’ tall tower, spill down and spread out to form a canopy over the stage. The canopy protects performers from the elements and acts as the stage’s hanging grid to support stage lighting and speaker arrays.

The Observation Tower and Austin360 Amphitheater serve as a memorable backdrop for the Circuit’s Grand Plaza. The 27-acre plaza, bordered by the track on three sides, lies in the heart of the Circuit and defines the public experience of the complex for most users entering the venue. As visitors enter the plaza they are greeted by a large hardscaped plaza and lawn containing a reflecting pool of nearly 16,000 square feet.. With the reflecting pool at one end and the tower and amphitheater at the other, this strong axial relationship across the plaza creates a dramatic moment of arrival. The plaza contains varying landscape zones that enclose the space and define unique areas of activity. The plaza’s location inside the arc of the track captures the energy of racing: its speed, noise, and excitement. The race rushes around visitors on all sides, heightening the experience of the track.

A promenade along the north side of the Grand Plaza hosts concessions, retail areas, restroom facilities, and the Turn 15 Grandstands. Along the promenade is a monumental lawn, sized to accommodate a variety of events throughout the year, including soccer games and music festivals. Pedestrian bridges, located at Turns 3 and 16, provide access for visitors to other areas of the circuit complex. The buildings of the promenade create a trellis-covered boulevard, which serves as a significant gathering point for visitors enjoying the many activities of the Grand Plaza. At the end of this promenade visitors will find a pedestrian bridge at Turn 16, which connects visitors to the track infield and to another bridge at Turn 3, which allows visitors to completely cross the track.

The Main Grandstand is located in front of the start and finish lines with views of Turn 1 and provides seating to over 9,000 spectators on three levels. The ground level houses offices and concessions, while the second floor contains amenities, including a 6,500 square-foot lounge and event space. The third floor hosts a second lounge and 29 private suites.

The Main Grandstand and the concessions buildings in the Grand Plaza were conceived as a modular system consisting of several components that can be arranged according to need. The concessions, with banners and deep canopies, can be expanded with restrooms, permanent seating or suites. Inherent to this “kit-of-parts” construction system is flexibility allowing the site to grow and change.

Circuit of The Americas / Miró Rivera Architects © Paul Finkel | Piston Design
Circuit of The Americas / Miró Rivera Architects © Circuit of the Americas
Circuit of The Americas / Miró Rivera Architects © Tomas Segura
Circuit of The Americas / Miró Rivera Architects © Ted Parker, Jr. | Circuit of the Americas
Circuit of The Americas / Miró Rivera Architects © Ted Parker, Jr. | Circuit of the Americas
Circuit of The Americas / Miró Rivera Architects © Steve Colburn
Circuit of The Americas / Miró Rivera Architects Courtesy of Miró Rivera Architects
Circuit of The Americas / Miró Rivera Architects Courtesy of Miró Rivera Architects
Circuit of The Americas / Miró Rivera Architects © Circuit of the Americas
Circuit of The Americas / Miró Rivera Architects © Dorna Sports
Circuit of The Americas / Miró Rivera Architects © Ted Parker, Jr. | Circuit of the Americas
Circuit of The Americas / Miró Rivera Architects © Michael Hsu | Miró Rivera Architects
Circuit of The Americas / Miró Rivera Architects © Circuit of the Americas
Circuit of The Americas / Miró Rivera Architects © Paul Finkel | Piston Design
Circuit of The Americas / Miró Rivera Architects © Michael Hsu | Miró Rivera Architects
Circuit of The Americas / Miró Rivera Architects © Michael Hsu | Miró Rivera Architects
Circuit of The Americas / Miró Rivera Architects © Paul Finkel | Piston Design
Circuit of The Americas / Miró Rivera Architects © Paul Finkel | Piston Design
Circuit of The Americas / Miró Rivera Architects © Michael Hsu | Miró Rivera Architects
Circuit of The Americas / Miró Rivera Architects © Ted Parker, Jr. | Circuit of the Americas
Circuit of The Americas / Miró Rivera Architects © Ted Parker, Jr. | Circuit of the Americas
Circuit of The Americas / Miró Rivera Architects © Michael Hsu | Miró Rivera Architects
Circuit of The Americas / Miró Rivera Architects © Ted Parker, Jr. | Circuit of the Americas
Circuit of The Americas / Miró Rivera Architects © Paul Finkel | Piston Design
Circuit of The Americas / Miró Rivera Architects © Paul Finkel | Piston Design
Circuit of The Americas / Miró Rivera Architects © Paul Finkel | Piston Design
Circuit of The Americas / Miró Rivera Architects © Ted Parker, Jr. | Circuit of the Americas
Circuit of The Americas / Miró Rivera Architects Sketches
Circuit of The Americas / Miró Rivera Architects Plan

Circuit of The Americas / Miró Rivera Architects originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 29 Jun 2013.

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Imagine Our Digital Future and Join the Glass House Conversations’ Last Online Dialogue

Imagine Our Digital Future and Join the Glass House Conversations' Last Online Dialogue From left: Andy Warhol, David Whitney, Philip Johnson, Dr. John Dalton, and Robert A. M. Stern in the Glass House in 1964. © David McCabe

How can the web best inspire new dialogue? What does preservation mean in the digital world? How do you imagine your digital future? 

Since 2010, Glass House Conversations have brought together an illustrious group of hosts and participants from many creative disciplines, including architecture, art, design, landscape architecture, and preservation. Now, for their 100th and final online dialogue, the Glass House Conversations would like for you to consider the questions above and share your thoughts on our collective digital future here on their website.

The Conversation is open to comments from the public now through July 7, at 8pm ET.

Imagine Our Digital Future and Join the Glass House Conversations' Last Online Dialogue originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 29 Jun 2013.

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National Museum of Korean Contemporary History / JUNGLIM Architecture

National Museum of Korean Contemporary History / JUNGLIM Architecture © Namgoong Sun

Architects: JUNGLIM Architecture
Location: Sejong-daero, Jongno-gu, Seoul, Korea
Client: Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism
Area: 6,444.7 sqm
Photographs: Namgoong Sun

Three issues; National Museum of Korean Contemporary History has three crucial design issues. First issue is remodelling the old building that has been used since 1950. It is to recollect and retain the 50 years of Korean modern history in Gwanghwa gate circus.

Secondly, it has got symbolical representation as the site is located in Korean symbolic central axis 1. The axis starts from Gyeongbok Palace of Joseon to Nam Mountain to Han River. The issue was raised how to begin and what to contain at the starting point of symbolic axis.

Lastly, it has a role of informing the Korean modern history. Although the period of history is 50 to 60 years, there have been many remarkable events and historical moments to remember and this museum should stand as a role example to demonstrate the history of Korea.

National Museum of Korean Contemporary History / JUNGLIM Architecture © Namgoong Sun
National Museum of Korean Contemporary History / JUNGLIM Architecture © Namgoong Sun
National Museum of Korean Contemporary History / JUNGLIM Architecture © Namgoong Sun
National Museum of Korean Contemporary History / JUNGLIM Architecture © Namgoong Sun
National Museum of Korean Contemporary History / JUNGLIM Architecture © Namgoong Sun
National Museum of Korean Contemporary History / JUNGLIM Architecture © Namgoong Sun
National Museum of Korean Contemporary History / JUNGLIM Architecture © Namgoong Sun
National Museum of Korean Contemporary History / JUNGLIM Architecture © Namgoong Sun
National Museum of Korean Contemporary History / JUNGLIM Architecture © Namgoong Sun
National Museum of Korean Contemporary History / JUNGLIM Architecture First Floor Plan
National Museum of Korean Contemporary History / JUNGLIM Architecture Third Floor Plan
National Museum of Korean Contemporary History / JUNGLIM Architecture Fifth Floor Plan
National Museum of Korean Contemporary History / JUNGLIM Architecture Sixth Floor Plan
National Museum of Korean Contemporary History / JUNGLIM Architecture Seventh Floor Plan
National Museum of Korean Contemporary History / JUNGLIM Architecture Site Plan
National Museum of Korean Contemporary History / JUNGLIM Architecture Section
National Museum of Korean Contemporary History / JUNGLIM Architecture Elevation
National Museum of Korean Contemporary History / JUNGLIM Architecture Elevation

National Museum of Korean Contemporary History / JUNGLIM Architecture originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 29 Jun 2013.

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Bracket 2: Goes Soft

Bracket 2: Goes Soft Bracket 2: Goes Soft

From the Publisher. Bracket 2 examines physical and virtual soft systems, as they pertain to infrastructure, ecologies, landscapes, environments, and networks. In an era of declared crises—economic, ecological and climatic, amongst others—the notion of soft systems has gained increasing traction as a counterpoint to permanent, static and hard systems. Acknowledging fluid and indeterminate situations with complex feedback loops that allow for reaction and adaption, the possibility of soft systems has re-entered the domain of design. Bracket 2 critically positions and defines soft systems through 27 projects and 12 articles. From soft politics, soft power and soft spaces to fluid territories, software and soft programming, Bracket 2 unpacks the use and role of responsive, indeterminate, flexible, and immaterial systems in design.

Publisher: ACTAR , InfraNet Lab
Editors: Neeraj Bhatia , Lola Sheppard
Language: English
Format: 20 x 27 cm (Soft Cover)
Illustrations: Color and duotone
Pages: 284
ISBN: 978-84-15391-02-9





Bracket 2: Goes Soft originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 29 Jun 2013.

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Iron Market Reconstruction / John McAslan + Partners

Iron Market Reconstruction / John McAslan + Partners © Hufton+ Crow

Architects: John McAslan + Partners
Location: Port-au-Prince, Département de l’Ouest, Haiti
Architect In Charge: John McAslan
Area: 4,645 sqm
Year: 2011
Photographs: Hufton+ Crow, Roger Leymone

Structural Engineer: Alan Baxter & Associates, Axis Design Group
Steel Engineer: O’BRIEN Steel Consulting
Specialist Metalwork: Arts and Ambiance

The Iron Market in Port-au-Prince has been an iconic symbol of Haitian community aspiration for over 120 years. Prefabricated in France by the celebrated engineers Baudet Donon & Cie, the iron structure was initially destined to serve as a railway station in Cairo (possibly explaining the building’s Islamic minarets), but for unknown reasons ended up in Haiti where it was inaugurated in 1891. Having suffered extensive fire damage in 2008 which destroyed the Market’s north hall, the central section and part of its southern range suffered severe damage in the devastating 2010 earthquake. The restored structure was inaugurated on January 11 2011, within one year of the earthquake.

John McAslan + Partners led a multi-disciplinary team, which included scores of local artisans, to resurrect the Market. Key details were preserved or repaired where possible and elements of new design in the restoration incorporate current thinking on earthquake resistance and seismic requirements. The practice also ensured high quality manufacture and finishes to reduce any maintenance requirements in the future.

The Iron Market is an important commercial and social hub for the residents of Port-au-Prince and a cultural, historic and architectural landmark in Haiti – a significant symbol for the country’s recovery from devastation. Fully back in use, it forms the cornerstone of a new cultural quarter redevelopment strategy.

Iron Market Reconstruction / John McAslan + Partners © Hufton+ Crow
Iron Market Reconstruction / John McAslan + Partners © Hufton+ Crow
Iron Market Reconstruction / John McAslan + Partners © Hufton+ Crow
Iron Market Reconstruction / John McAslan + Partners © Hufton+ Crow
Iron Market Reconstruction / John McAslan + Partners © Hufton+ Crow
Iron Market Reconstruction / John McAslan + Partners © Hufton+ Crow
Iron Market Reconstruction / John McAslan + Partners © Hufton+ Crow
Iron Market Reconstruction / John McAslan + Partners © Hufton+ Crow
Iron Market Reconstruction / John McAslan + Partners © Hufton+ Crow
Iron Market Reconstruction / John McAslan + Partners © Roger Leymone
Iron Market Reconstruction / John McAslan + Partners © Roger Leymone
Iron Market Reconstruction / John McAslan + Partners Floor Plan
Iron Market Reconstruction / John McAslan + Partners Site Plan
Iron Market Reconstruction / John McAslan + Partners Section
Iron Market Reconstruction / John McAslan + Partners North Elevation
Iron Market Reconstruction / John McAslan + Partners East Elevation

Iron Market Reconstruction / John McAslan + Partners originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 29 Jun 2013.

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Taichung City Cultural Center Competition Entry / RMJM

Taichung City Cultural Center Competition Entry / RMJM Courtesy of RMJM

With arts and culture at the core of Taichung’s urban identity, and the vision to lead in innovation and technology, this design proposal by RMJM seeks to bring together these significant attributes in a building emblematic of Taichung’s achievements and vision. Located at the corner of Taichung Gateway Park, the project becomes an urban oasis and a vital link between existing communities and future urban development, providing a social and cultural focus and an arrival gateway to the park. More images and architects’ description after the break.

We live in an archival era characterized by an impulse to collect, where all our experiences are supported by technological additions and digital information monitoring. A cultural center is a place of learning and a repository of information, in essence, a large archive. This accumulation of information can be thought of as a sort of “digital cloud,” an invisible archive of sorts.

Linked to this technological framework, the design is envisioned as a “Cultural Cloud” symbolizing what is at once both ethereal and of our age, ancient and futuristic. The “Cultural Cloud” will be an iconic landmark for Taichung, and a tribute to Taiwan’s transformation from an agricultural island to one of the high-tech leaders in the Asia-Pacific region, with Taichung as the gateway.

The building and its landscape work in harmony to satisfy a multitude of programmatic uses and to reinforce the connection to the park. The ground plane is transformed into a rolling landscape accessible from every direction, with the structure lifted off the ground, creating a cultural and recreational plaza. 

A floating building mass comprised of shifting volumes is shrouded in a porous wrap, creating a perpetual geometric cloud which hovers above the site in the boundless sky. A delicate, semi-transparent structure forms this geometric cloud and facilitates a combination of photovoltaic and translucent panels at its surface. The cloud’s surface will harness the solar power and provide shading for the floating gardens, observation decks, and roof top terraces that inhabit the interstitial space between the cloud and the building mass, offering a unique experience for patrons and visitors.

While the program for the library and the museum are unified into a single articulated mass, the building is organized to allow for independent operation with shared public spaces located in the sunken plaza. Rooted in the belief that the ultimate structural expression is when the structure is unseen yet implied, the structural system, while reinforcing the building design, for this gravity defying, floating mass is yet one more step in the projection of that design philosophy. 

With sustainability as a central theme, each element of the design strategy reflects an ambitious effort towards achieving sustainable architecture both in the building’s organization, innovative use of efficient materials and construction solutions. The design combines passive solar energy strategies of direct gain and natural ventilation, with sustainable mechanical strategies towards an overall strategy for CO2 reduction. 

Building programs are positioned to take advantage of daylight and views. The elevated building mass with staggered volumes enhances site’s permeability, while creating shading and wind passage-ways for outdoor thermal comfort. The cloud wrap is designed to act as a double façade enclosure providing for integration of PV panels which also double as shading screen, while providing for air circulation and natural cooling.

Architects: RMJM
Location: Taichung, Taiwan
Design Team: Mahasti Fakourbayat (Design Principal); Andrea Pietrucci (Team Leader); Hao Li (Design Architect); Stefano Tronci, Alice Yeh, Anson Tsui, Dominika Henzel, Edward Wu (Design Team)
Landscape Design: RMJM
Mep/Sustainability: Arup
Structural Engineer: Severud Associates
Program: Public Library and Fine Arts Museum
Status: Competition entry
Size: Total GFA 63,700sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Courtesy of RMJM

Taichung City Cultural Center Competition Entry / RMJM Courtesy of RMJM
Taichung City Cultural Center Competition Entry / RMJM Courtesy of RMJM
Taichung City Cultural Center Competition Entry / RMJM Courtesy of RMJM
Taichung City Cultural Center Competition Entry / RMJM Courtesy of RMJM
Taichung City Cultural Center Competition Entry / RMJM Courtesy of RMJM
Taichung City Cultural Center Competition Entry / RMJM plan
Taichung City Cultural Center Competition Entry / RMJM east elevation
Taichung City Cultural Center Competition Entry / RMJM sustainable building strategies diagram

Taichung City Cultural Center Competition Entry / RMJM originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 29 Jun 2013.

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Blanc, Showroom L’Antic Colonial / Fran Silvestre Arquitectos

Blanc, Showroom L'Antic Colonial / Fran Silvestre Arquitectos © Fernando Alda

Architects: Fran Silvestre Arquitectos
Location: Villareal, Castellón
Design Team: Fran Silvestre Jordi, Martínez, María José Sáez
Area: 29 sqm
Photographs: Fernando Alda

Collaborators: Ángel Fito, Adrián Mora, Maria Masià

A large format stereotomy states all benefits of natural stone.

Two kinds of white marble with slightly greyish seams and three kinds of finishings to them. Polished, brush hammered and sandblasted, they supply altogether a range of ten different textures in a space full with contrasts even within its continuity.

Changes of colour in natural light reflect on their surfaces during day-time. Artificial light is introduced into a recess of the stone, allowing for backlighting. A night-time illumination rich in warm, almost golden tones.

Blanc, Showroom L'Antic Colonial / Fran Silvestre Arquitectos © Fernando Alda
Blanc, Showroom L'Antic Colonial / Fran Silvestre Arquitectos © Fernando Alda
Blanc, Showroom L'Antic Colonial / Fran Silvestre Arquitectos © Fernando Alda
Blanc, Showroom L'Antic Colonial / Fran Silvestre Arquitectos © Fernando Alda
Blanc, Showroom L'Antic Colonial / Fran Silvestre Arquitectos © Fernando Alda
Blanc, Showroom L'Antic Colonial / Fran Silvestre Arquitectos © Fernando Alda
Blanc, Showroom L'Antic Colonial / Fran Silvestre Arquitectos Floor Plan
Blanc, Showroom L'Antic Colonial / Fran Silvestre Arquitectos Floor Plan

Blanc, Showroom L'Antic Colonial / Fran Silvestre Arquitectos originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 29 Jun 2013.

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Oceanfront Residence in Hawaii Displaying A Creative Design Approach

exterior North Shore Beachfront Home 02 Oceanfront Residence in Hawaii Displaying A Creative Design Approach

At a first glance, you may believe this is an enticing resort. In fact, the property in the photos below is as intimate as can get. Currently listed on Sotheby’s for $9,500,000, this massive oceanfront residence in Hawaii features an impressive overall layout, three bedrooms and plenty of outdoor leisure opportunities. The first level is completely open, with pillars separating the spaces and supporting the floor above. A perfect setting composed of lush vegetation and a pond surrounds the building.

architecture North Shore Beachfront Home 28 Oceanfront Residence in Hawaii Displaying A Creative Design Approach

With its unique location, the house offers many incentives: “Launch your windsurfer, stand-up board or kayak from your own backyard located on this exclusive cove in Spreckelsville. Built to last a lifetime the home has a travertine exterior as well as travertine lanai floors, a copper shingle roof, copper clad windows and copper roll-up garage doors. 16 poured concrete columns support the dramatic cantilevered upper level. Walk inside and feel as though you are on the ocean“. How would you comment on the overall design and layout of this property?

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