CH2 Melbourne City Council House 2 / DesignInc

CH2 Melbourne City Council House 2 / DesignInc © Dianna Snape

Architects: DesignInc
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Project Team: Rob Adams (Project Director -City of Melbourne), Mick Pearce (Design Director), Stephen Webb (Design Architect), Chris Thorne (Design Architect), Jean-Claude Bertoni (Project Architect), Vi Vuong (Architect), Aldona Pajdak (Interior Designer)
Area: 12,500 sqm
Photographs: Dianna Snape, David Hannah

Consultant Team: Hansen Yuncken (Builder), Bonacci Group (Structural / Civil Consultant), Lincolne Scott (Services Consultant), Marshall Day (Acoustics Consultant), Advanced Environmental Concepts (Environmental Consultant), Donald Cant Watts Corke (Quantity Surveyor), City of Melbourne (Landscape Consultant)
Client: City of Melbourne
Constructions Value: $51M

The Council House 2 (CH2) office building was designed in collaboration with City of Melbourne to be a holistic system with its occupants as participants. The design follows a model that promotes a more interactive role between the city and nature, in which all parties depend on each other.

The City of Melbourne aims to achieve zero emissions for the municipality by 2020. A major contribution to this strategy is the reduction in energy consumption of commercial buildings by 50%. CH2 was piloted in an effort to provide a working example for the local development market. The brief required a building that as far as possible relied on passive energy systems while producing a premium grade building.

CH2 employs both literal and metaphorical expressions of environmental intentions in its architectural composition. Nature is used as inspiration for façades that moderate climate, tapered ventilation ducts integrate with day lighting strategies and an evocative undulating concrete floor structure that plays a central role in the building’s heating and cooling.

It was the first new commercial office building in Australia to meet and exceed the six star rating system administered by the Green Building Council of Australia. Equally important to its environmental features is that it provides 100% fresh air to all occupants with one complete air change every half hour.

The benefits of superior indoor air quality and conservative estimates on energy costs will see the building pay for all its innovation within five to ten years.

CH2 Melbourne City Council House 2 / DesignInc © Dianna Snape
CH2 Melbourne City Council House 2 / DesignInc © Dianna Snape
CH2 Melbourne City Council House 2 / DesignInc © Dianna Snape
CH2 Melbourne City Council House 2 / DesignInc © Dianna Snape
CH2 Melbourne City Council House 2 / DesignInc © Dianna Snape
CH2 Melbourne City Council House 2 / DesignInc © Dianna Snape
CH2 Melbourne City Council House 2 / DesignInc © David Hannah
CH2 Melbourne City Council House 2 / DesignInc © Dianna Snape
CH2 Melbourne City Council House 2 / DesignInc © Dianna Snape
CH2 Melbourne City Council House 2 / DesignInc © Dianna Snape
CH2 Melbourne City Council House 2 / DesignInc © Dianna Snape
CH2 Melbourne City Council House 2 / DesignInc © Dianna Snape
CH2 Melbourne City Council House 2 / DesignInc Section / © DesignInc
CH2 Melbourne City Council House 2 / DesignInc Section / © DesignInc
CH2 Melbourne City Council House 2 / DesignInc Plan / © DesignInc
CH2 Melbourne City Council House 2 / DesignInc Bioclimatic Section Day / © DesignInc
CH2 Melbourne City Council House 2 / DesignInc Bioclimatic Section Night / © DesignInc
CH2 Melbourne City Council House 2 / DesignInc Section Detail / © DesignInc
CH2 Melbourne City Council House 2 / DesignInc Elevation / © DesignInc
CH2 Melbourne City Council House 2 / DesignInc Plan / © DesignInc
CH2 Melbourne City Council House 2 / DesignInc Plan / © DesignInc
CH2 Melbourne City Council House 2 / DesignInc Plan / © DesignInc
CH2 Melbourne City Council House 2 / DesignInc Plan / © DesignInc
CH2 Melbourne City Council House 2 / DesignInc Plan / © DesignInc
CH2 Melbourne City Council House 2 / DesignInc Plan / © DesignInc

CH2 Melbourne City Council House 2 / DesignInc originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 30 Jun 2013.

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Ways to Read Freshome After Google Reader Shuts Down

If you’re reading this post in Google Reader, you won’t be doing so next week. After July 1st 2013 that’s this coming Monday! Google Reader is shutting down FOR GOOD. Our RSS feeds have been pretty reliant on Google Reader for years. (For those who don’t know- Google Reader was a free service that pulled new posts, or “RSS feeds”, from blogs & websites, pooling all of the content onto one easy to read page. It was an incredibly convenient way to keep up with all of your favorite blogs.) If you’re a Google Reader user, obviously you need a new tool to read your subscriptions. We have a few thoughts for you on that, so here are our favorite alternatives.

feedly freshome Ways to Read Freshome After Google Reader Shuts Down

Feedly

Feedly has become one of the more popular choices, as it very closely resembles the same features as Google Reader. The import process is a breeze, so you won’t lose any content. They also have more detailed migration instructions here: Tips for Google reader users migrating to feedly.

freshome flipboard Ways to Read Freshome After Google Reader Shuts Down

FLIPBOARD

Flipboard is the most popular of the magazine-like content aggregator apps. In addition to its own curated feeds, it connects with a variety of social networks that can collect news feeds – including Twitter, Facebook, and Google+. For many readers, though, Flipboard’s lack of a web or desktop client will be a deal-breaker. At least for now, it’s iOS and Android only. You can follow us on Flipboard – just download the app for Apple or from Google Play. Use these instructions to migrate your Google Reader feeds into Flipboard.

blogloving freshome Ways to Read Freshome After Google Reader Shuts Down

Bloglovin’

Bloglovin’ is a great alternative to Google Reader, especially if you like to read blog posts on the blogs themselves, rather than reading the full text inside of a reader. You can follow Freshome on Bloglovin here.

Finally …if you don’t use RSS you can read us any time on your favorite social network.

Facebook

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Twitter

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Google+

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You’re reading Ways to Read Freshome After Google Reader Shuts Down originally posted on Freshome.

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Aluminium Flower Garden / Moriyuki Ochiai Architects

Aluminium Flower Garden / Moriyuki Ochiai Architects Courtesy of Moriyuki Ochiai Architects

Architects: Moriyuki Ochiai Architects
Location: Tokyo, Japan
Year: 2013
Photographs: Courtesy of Moriyuki Ochiai Architects

Since they give the space its singularity, we adapted the assembly method of the aluminum ceiling parts so as to be able to disassemble and reinstall them when moving the business to a different location. In doing so, we devised a way to effectively reduce the costs of moving.

Aluminium Flower Garden / Moriyuki Ochiai Architects Courtesy of Moriyuki Ochiai Architects
Aluminium Flower Garden / Moriyuki Ochiai Architects Courtesy of Moriyuki Ochiai Architects
Aluminium Flower Garden / Moriyuki Ochiai Architects Courtesy of Moriyuki Ochiai Architects
Aluminium Flower Garden / Moriyuki Ochiai Architects Courtesy of Moriyuki Ochiai Architects
Aluminium Flower Garden / Moriyuki Ochiai Architects Courtesy of Moriyuki Ochiai Architects
Aluminium Flower Garden / Moriyuki Ochiai Architects Courtesy of Moriyuki Ochiai Architects
Aluminium Flower Garden / Moriyuki Ochiai Architects Courtesy of Moriyuki Ochiai Architects
Aluminium Flower Garden / Moriyuki Ochiai Architects Courtesy of Moriyuki Ochiai Architects
Aluminium Flower Garden / Moriyuki Ochiai Architects Courtesy of Moriyuki Ochiai Architects
Aluminium Flower Garden / Moriyuki Ochiai Architects Courtesy of Moriyuki Ochiai Architects
Aluminium Flower Garden / Moriyuki Ochiai Architects Courtesy of Moriyuki Ochiai Architects
Aluminium Flower Garden / Moriyuki Ochiai Architects Floor Plan
Aluminium Flower Garden / Moriyuki Ochiai Architects Section
Aluminium Flower Garden / Moriyuki Ochiai Architects Section
Aluminium Flower Garden / Moriyuki Ochiai Architects Section

Aluminium Flower Garden / Moriyuki Ochiai Architects originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 30 Jun 2013.

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‘Occupy Infrastructure’: MOMA PS1 Rockaway Call for Ideas Winning Proposal / Barkow Leibinger Architects

'Occupy Infrastructure': MOMA PS1 Rockaway Call for Ideas Winning Proposal / Barkow Leibinger Architects Courtesy of Barkow Leibinger Architects

One of the selected entries in the MOMA PS1 Rockaway Call for Ideas, the ’Occupy Infrastructure’ proposal by Barkow Leibinger Architects is three-fold. The main idea is to construct a network of retaining berms based on priority and need with local materials and by the communities that they protect. These berms are not continuous (like a wall) but overlap to allow beach access, gateways, and to maintain visual and spatial openness and continuity between beaches and neighborhoods.  More images and architects’ description after the break.

We need to repair these communities from the damage that has been done, then, to protect them from future destruction as our waters rise, but also to offer something new. Social and event spaces that are made from protective infrastructure. These are in a sense multi-tasking systems: you can walk on them like a boardwalk, you can use them as amphitheaters, they create spaces behind them on the landside for farming, gardens, sports, swimming, shops, events, pavilions or camping. It’s an open-ended system: The communities that they protect will determine different ways how to use them based on need and interest. Its flexible and what we are showing is not set in stone but is a kind of demonstration of how this might work.

There is also an idea that focuses on how you make such a project: How do you build it? We have a lot of experience with smart materials. For examples, communities can collect waste plastic for example from the ocean: you can recycle it combining it with cement to make infralight concrete, 1/3 the weight of regular construction concrete that can at the same time make really strong retaining structures. These are building blocks of a variety of shapes that can be made on-site and with local participation. Smart, light, and strong. These blocks are interlocking and open so plants can grow between them and water can drain through them and return to the ocean.

This project can be phased over time, you don’t have to do it all at once, as needed and by priority: this is a democratic process and will be determined by the communities. No barrier, this idea is like a protective landscape that can open and close making a sequence of spaces like an emerald necklace. Over time the berms will be integrated into the beach as they are partially covered in sand, by vegetation and trees. Boardwalks and bridges zigzagging across the crowns of the berms will connect meadows, orchards, sport fields, swimming pools, and pavilions and shops.

Rockaway can take possession of this landscape, use it and extend neighborhoods into them. Occupy Infrastructure that is pragmatic but also poetic.

Click here to view the embedded video.

'Occupy Infrastructure': MOMA PS1 Rockaway Call for Ideas Winning Proposal / Barkow Leibinger Architects Courtesy of Barkow Leibinger Architects
'Occupy Infrastructure': MOMA PS1 Rockaway Call for Ideas Winning Proposal / Barkow Leibinger Architects Courtesy of Barkow Leibinger Architects
'Occupy Infrastructure': MOMA PS1 Rockaway Call for Ideas Winning Proposal / Barkow Leibinger Architects Courtesy of Barkow Leibinger Architects
'Occupy Infrastructure': MOMA PS1 Rockaway Call for Ideas Winning Proposal / Barkow Leibinger Architects Courtesy of Barkow Leibinger Architects
'Occupy Infrastructure': MOMA PS1 Rockaway Call for Ideas Winning Proposal / Barkow Leibinger Architects Courtesy of Barkow Leibinger Architects
'Occupy Infrastructure': MOMA PS1 Rockaway Call for Ideas Winning Proposal / Barkow Leibinger Architects site plan
'Occupy Infrastructure': MOMA PS1 Rockaway Call for Ideas Winning Proposal / Barkow Leibinger Architects site sections
'Occupy Infrastructure': MOMA PS1 Rockaway Call for Ideas Winning Proposal / Barkow Leibinger Architects post-Sandy concept diagram
'Occupy Infrastructure': MOMA PS1 Rockaway Call for Ideas Winning Proposal / Barkow Leibinger Architects diagram

'Occupy Infrastructure': MOMA PS1 Rockaway Call for Ideas Winning Proposal / Barkow Leibinger Architects originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 30 Jun 2013.

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Split House / TWS & Partners

Split House / TWS & Partners Courtesy of TWS & Partners

Architects: TWS & Partners
Location: West Jakarta, Indonesia
Photographs: Courtesy of TWS & Partners

Split House, a name that is dragged from its own concept including the backgrounds and functions that are not only happen by now but already have been processing since the existing building was standing and the renovation construction was on. Located in the very dense residential area in West Jakarta, the typology of residential is divided by several housing land lots, usually designed in rows that each is separated by a street.

This project is a renovation project of an existing house on 6

Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler

Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler © Vincent Monthiers

Architects: Agence Bernard Bühler
Location: Toulouse, France
Consulting Engineers: ETBA (Bétons) CGB Concept (Thermique) Freddy Charrier (Paysagiste)
Area: 3,489 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Vincent Monthiers, Courtesy of Agence Bernard Bühler

The building is defined by two sorts of façade. The characteristic of the south façade are loggias, protected by colored glass slides and a casing of wood slatted. The façade is changing according to the point of view. The north façade is colored, contrasting the south façade, while highlighting its moving side.

Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler © Vincent Monthiers
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler © Vincent Monthiers
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler © Vincent Monthiers
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler © Vincent Monthiers
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler Courtesy of Agence Bernard Bühler
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler © Vincent Monthiers
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler © Vincent Monthiers
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler © Vincent Monthiers
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler © Vincent Monthiers
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler © Vincent Monthiers
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler © Vincent Monthiers
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler © Vincent Monthiers
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler © Vincent Monthiers
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler © Vincent Monthiers
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler © Vincent Monthiers
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler © Vincent Monthiers
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler © Vincent Monthiers
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler Courtesy of Agence Bernard Bühler
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler Courtesy of Agence Bernard Bühler
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler Courtesy of Agence Bernard Bühler
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler Courtesy of Agence Bernard Bühler
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler Courtesy of Agence Bernard Bühler
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler Courtesy of Agence Bernard Bühler
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler Courtesy of Agence Bernard Bühler
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler Courtesy of Agence Bernard Bühler
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler Courtesy of Agence Bernard Bühler
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler Courtesy of Agence Bernard Bühler
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler Courtesy of Agence Bernard Bühler
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler Courtesy of Agence Bernard Bühler
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler Courtesy of Agence Bernard Bühler
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler Courtesy of Agence Bernard Bühler
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler Courtesy of Agence Bernard Bühler
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler Plan
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler Plan
Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler Site Plan

Residence Origami / Agence Bernard Bühler originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 30 Jun 2013.

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Casa Citriodora | Seeley Architects

Casa Citriodora 6

La Casa Citriodora es una bonita villa diseñada por el estudio Seeley Architects y construida en la ciudad de Anglesa Australia. Hecha de madera para una perfecta integración en el entorno, sino que también ofrece grandes espacios interiores y una magnífica terraza panorámica.

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Súper realistas y alucinantes esculturas humanas | Ron Mueck

Súper realistas y alucinantes esculturas humanas 1

Al igual que varios otros escultores hiperrealistas Ron Mueck comenzó su carrera en el entretenimiento de la escultura, donde comenzó a trabajar como titiritero, la creación de modelos y títeres para películas infantiles y programas de televisión. Lo más notable es que él trabajó en la película Laberinto de Jim Henson, e incluso prestó su voz para el personaje de Ludo. En 1996 hizo el cambio a las bellas artes y se levantó rápidamente a la prominencia con exposiciones en la Real Academia y la Galería Nacional de Londres.

In The Mood For Cheongsam | FARM

In The Mood For Cheongsam 1

En su estado actual, moderna Shanghai está en auge con la arquitectura, la moda, las finanzas y la tecnología. Como la ciudad más grande de población en el mundo, los viajeros acuden a la metrópoli para disfrutar de una ciudad llena de luces, aventura y una interpretación única de la cultura pop occidental. Aunque hay mucho que celebrar sobre el movimiento moderno de la ciudad, es innegable que Shanghai en los años 1920 y 30, denominado por los chinos como el “viejo Shanghai”, resume la más glamorosa y con más estilo de la China en el siglo pasado.

El Museo Nacional de Singapur presentó recientemente el glamour de “Old Shanghai” en una exposición titulada ‘In The Mood For Cheongsam‘. Aludiendo al título de la muestra, el diseño juega a los misterios y las sutilezas de la Cheongsam, el cuerpo que abraza una sola pieza del vestido chino tradicional para las mujeres. Evocados por la calidad sensual de Cheongsam, la exposición, que fue diseñado por el estudio de diseño basado en Singapur FARM, toma la forma de las paredes curvas como un vestido, grandes bolsillos escultura de espacios en los que cada uno esconde y revela la pantalla, se burla y sorpresas.

In The Mood For Cheongsam 2

La exposición es un espacio continuo singular, con paredes curvas que atrae a los visitantes y se mueven a través del espacio. Los creativos en FARM han diseñados bolsas blandas de espacios a lo largo de la exposición, a veces, otras veces convexas cóncavas en la naturaleza, a veces extensas, a veces íntimas. La exposición es una experiencia espacial que sigue sorprendiendo a diferentes secciones dentro de la idea singular.

In The Mood For Cheongsam 3

Proporcionar un marco para las diversas secciones es clave para proporcionar diferenciación y una narración a la exposición. Basamentos circulares, empleadas todo, alteran en forma de sugerir estos cambios en la narrativa y el contexto. Los objetos o muebles sencillos correspondiente a la época o el tema de la sección también se integran junto con el Cheongsam en la pantalla para crear una puesta en escena dentro de la sección.

In The Mood For Cheongsam 4

El diseño del cheongsam todavía tiene influencia en la moda de hoy en día, ya que se ha convertido en la inspiración para las colecciones recientes, como la colección de Jason Wu Otoño / Invierno 2012, la colección de Gucci Otoño / Invierno 2012, y la colección Primavera / Verano 2013 de Emilio Pucci, por lo que el título de la exposición ‘In The Mood For Cheongsam”extremadamente relevante.

In The Mood For Cheongsam 5

Colección Ray para Fabbian Illuminazione | Lagranja Design

Colección Ray para Fabbian Illuminazione 1

Lagranja Design ha diseñado una colección de lámparas llamadas Ray para Fabbian Illuminazione.
Toma el ejemplo de persianas típicamente mediterráneas. La luz que se “escapa” entre los listones diseñada por la forma de la lámpara. La calidad es en el centro del proyecto. Ray crea una luz directa sobre una mesa o superficie de trabajo y una luz difusa indirecta en el resto de la habitación. La colección de lámparas Ray consiste en una lámpara de suspensión, una lámpara de mesa y una lámpara de pie, todos hechos de policarbonato blanco con estructura de metal con recubrimiento de polvo y apoyada en policarbonato. Estas lámparas cuentan con una bombilla halógena, el acoplamiento E27 es también compatible con las bombillas de bajo consumo.

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