Unconventional Home Layout in 4 Separate Volumes: The Me Too House

architecture Me Too residence Unconventional Home Layout in 4 Separate Volumes: The Me Too House
Building a home on a land usually implies constructing a single unit and taking it further from there. However, the architects at LADAA came up with a different idea for this family residence located in Sagunto, Valencia, Spain. The Mee Too House consists of four interconnected volumes each with a different height, “thus reaching for the maximum integration with the topography of the surrounding area and a natural decomposition of the requirement program“. Gray concrete, zinc panels and steel columns delimit the profile of the building from the generously-sized garden lot which opens to the surrounding views.
design Me Too residence Unconventional Home Layout in 4 Separate Volumes: The Me Too House

As you probably noticed, the volumes are single-leveled, except for the construction accommodating the bedrooms (top floor for the parents and ground floor for the children). The indoor-outdoor transition is visually striking: “Outwardly we wanted to show the house as quiet and simple. And on the inside changing the scale, here showing it as extroverted, exaggerated and luxurious“. Each volume servers a certain function (day area  & social zones, night area) and the connection is achieved through passages with stairs. How would you comment on this home’s unusual layout? Find it appealing?
exterior Me Too residence Unconventional Home Layout in 4 Separate Volumes: The Me Too House Me Too residence 4 Unconventional Home Layout in 4 Separate Volumes: The Me Too House Me Too residence 5 Unconventional Home Layout in 4 Separate Volumes: The Me Too House Me Too residence 6 Unconventional Home Layout in 4 Separate Volumes: The Me Too House Me Too residence 7 Unconventional Home Layout in 4 Separate Volumes: The Me Too House Me Too residence 8 Unconventional Home Layout in 4 Separate Volumes: The Me Too House Me Too residence 9 Unconventional Home Layout in 4 Separate Volumes: The Me Too House Me Too residence 10 Unconventional Home Layout in 4 Separate Volumes: The Me Too House Me Too residence 11 Unconventional Home Layout in 4 Separate Volumes: The Me Too House Me Too residence 12 Unconventional Home Layout in 4 Separate Volumes: The Me Too House Me Too residence 13 Unconventional Home Layout in 4 Separate Volumes: The Me Too House Me Too residence 14 Unconventional Home Layout in 4 Separate Volumes: The Me Too House Me Too residence 15 Unconventional Home Layout in 4 Separate Volumes: The Me Too House Me Too residence 16 Unconventional Home Layout in 4 Separate Volumes: The Me Too House Me Too residence 17 Unconventional Home Layout in 4 Separate Volumes: The Me Too House Me Too residence 18 Unconventional Home Layout in 4 Separate Volumes: The Me Too House Me Too residence 19 Unconventional Home Layout in 4 Separate Volumes: The Me Too House Me Too residence 20 Unconventional Home Layout in 4 Separate Volumes: The Me Too House Me Too residence 21 Unconventional Home Layout in 4 Separate Volumes: The Me Too House Me Too residence 22 Unconventional Home Layout in 4 Separate Volumes: The Me Too House Me Too residence 23 Unconventional Home Layout in 4 Separate Volumes: The Me Too House Me Too residence 24 Unconventional Home Layout in 4 Separate Volumes: The Me Too House Me Too residence 25 Unconventional Home Layout in 4 Separate Volumes: The Me Too House Me Too residence 26 Unconventional Home Layout in 4 Separate Volumes: The Me Too House

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Happy 78th Birthday Sir Norman Foster

Sir Norman Foster, arguably the leader of a generation of British architects, turns 78 today. Foster gained recognition as early as the 1970s as a key architect in the high-tech movement, which continues to have a profound impact on architecture as we know it today.

Foster’s architecture is remarkably diverse; he has designed skyscrapers, offices, galleries, airports, stadiums, parliament buildings, city masterplans and even a spaceport. Yet his work is unified by one theme, identified in the jury citation for his 1999 Pritzker Prize: “from his very first projects, it was evident that he would embrace the most advanced technology appropriate to the task”. It is this devotion to the latest architectural technology that earned him his place in the high-tech movement, with buildings such as the Willis Faber & Dumas headquarters and the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts.

Since these early successes, his practice Foster + Partners has been prolific, earning Foster two Stirling Prizes, an RIBA Gold Medal, an AIA Gold Medal and a knighthood in addition to his Pritzker Prize. Designs such as the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank, The Gherkin in London, The Hearst Tower in New York and Masdar City have ensured that Foster has secured his place as one of the greatest architects of the 21st century.

On the occasion of Sir Norman Foster’s birthday, we invite you to look at some of the outstanding projects from his exceptional career:

Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts
Masdar Institute
Hearst Tower
Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank
Apple Campus
Queen Alia International Airport
Beijing Airport
Spaceport America
Willis Headquarters

Happy 78th Birthday Sir Norman Foster originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 01 Jun 2013.

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Living Architectures: Gehry’s Vertigo / Ila Bêka & Louise Lemoine

Fourth project of the Living Architectures series, Gehry’s Vertigo offers to the spectator a rare and vertiginous trip on the top roofs of the Guggenheim Museum of Bilbao. Through the portrait of the climbing team in charge of the glass cleaning, their ascensions, their techniques and difficulties, this film observes the complexity and virtuosity of Frank Gehry’s architecture.

“Living Architectures” is a series of films that seeks to develop a way of looking at architecture which turns away from the current trend of idealizing the representation of our architectural heritage.

Through these films, Ila Bêka and Louise Lemoine put into question the fascination with the picture, which covers up the buildings with preconceived ideas of perfection, virtuosity and infallibility, in order to demonstrate the vitality, fragility and vulnerable beauty of architecture as recounted and witnessed by people who actually live in, use or maintain the spaces they have selected. Thus, their intention is to talk about architecture, or rather to let architecture talk to us, from an «inner» point of view, both personal and subjective.

Unlike most movies about architecture, these films focus less on explaining the building, its structure and its technical details than on letting the viewer enter into the invisible bubble of the daily intimacy of some icons of contemporary architecture. Through a series of moments and fragments of life, an unusually spontaneous portrait of the building would emerge. This experiment presents a new way of looking at architecture which broadens the field of its representation.

DVD CONTENTS

Gehry’s Vertigo:
Time length:48 min
Language:Spanish
Subs:English, French

Living Architectures:
Time length:37 min
Language:Multilingual
Subs:English, French

Dvd Pal:Region All

BOOK CONTENTS

– Foreword
– The Diary
– Behind the Image

Publisher: BêkaPartners
Authors: Ila Bêka & Louise Lemoine
Format:19.5 x 22.8 (1 Book + 1 DVD)
Pages:140 (Hardcover)
Language: English, French
ISBN: 979-10-92194-03-6

Living Architectures: Gehry's Vertigo / Ila Bêka & Louise Lemoine originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 01 Jun 2013.

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Happy 72nd Birthday, Toyo Ito!

Toyo Ito (June 1, 1941) turns 72 today, only three days after receiving the Pritzker Prize in Boston. In his acceptance speech Wednesday night, Ito explained that for him, “the task of the architect is to release people from [conventional and] restrictive frameworks by creating spaces in which they feel at ease and in which they can attain some degree of freedom.”

Not only is Toyo Ito renowned for striving to make flexible spaces that appeal to the human senses, he also draws most of his inspiration from the organic forms of nature and prioritizes fluidity between the natural world and the built form in his designs. Yet despite having a specific perspective on what architects and architecture should aspire to be, Ito defies definition – each of his many works is extremely unique and he is famous for being able to “synthesize many architectural languages and functionalities in the expression of one personal ‘syntax’.”

We invite you to explore the work of this year’s most celebrated architect after the break.

Toyo Ito’s work on ArchDaily:

The Life and Work of Toyo Ito
Odate Dome 
Yatsushiro Municipal Museum 
White U 
Silver Hut 
Sendai Mediatheque 
Tower of Winds 
Serpentine Gallery Pavilion

Happy 72nd Birthday, Toyo Ito! originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 01 Jun 2013.

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School Classroom / Loïc Picquet Architecte

Architects: Loïc Picquet Architecte
Location: Montreux-Vieux, Alsace, France
Architect In Charge: Loïc Picquet Architecte
Year: 2012
Photographs: Stéphane Spach

This building emphasizes the ludic sense of teaching and learning. The classroom’s design shows cheerfully its use and attributes on “learn by playing”.

Through its shape and colors, the building becomes a remarkable point in the village and an good reference for the kids. The classroom is bathed in a natural luminosity that evolves during the day without ever presenting a discomfort to its occupants.

The glassed front porch let the kids feel that they are outside even while they are in class, making school look like somewhere where learning can be fun and uncomplicated.

School Classroom / Loïc Picquet Architecte © Stéphane Spach
School Classroom / Loïc Picquet Architecte © Stéphane Spach
School Classroom / Loïc Picquet Architecte © Stéphane Spach
School Classroom / Loïc Picquet Architecte © Stéphane Spach
School Classroom / Loïc Picquet Architecte © Stéphane Spach
School Classroom / Loïc Picquet Architecte © Stéphane Spach
School Classroom / Loïc Picquet Architecte © Stéphane Spach
School Classroom / Loïc Picquet Architecte First Floor Plan
School Classroom / Loïc Picquet Architecte Elevation
School Classroom / Loïc Picquet Architecte Detail

School Classroom / Loïc Picquet Architecte originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 01 Jun 2013.

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Monterey Design Conference 2013

Hosted by the American Institute of Architects, California Council (AIACC), the Monterey Design Conference 2013 will offer participants three days of talks by–and relaxed conversations with– internationally and nationally significant architects. Taking place September 27-29 in the Elysian setting of the Northern California coast, participants will find themselves strolling on the beach, wandering the Julia Morgan designed grounds or sitting on the deck of the main lodge engaging in conversation with a Pritzker Prize winner or many of the most innovative and catalytic thinkers in architecture, as if they were invited into their own backyard. This is truly a premier opportunity to be a participant in the dialog about design. For more information, please visit here.

Monterey Design Conference 2013 originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 01 Jun 2013.

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Terminal Conection / Danielsen

Architects: Danielsen
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
Architect In Charge: Kasper Danielsen Arkitekter A/S
General Contractor: Promecon
Engineer: Moe & Brødsgaard A/S
Area: 4,500 sqm
Year: 2007
Photographs: Courtesy of Danielsen

Copenhagen Airport is continuously voted one of the best airports in the world and is a major hub in Scandinavia. As part of the Client goal to maintain this position the Terminal Connector was required to have iconic architectural presence while still being contextual with the existing terminal buildings. Further client requirements included, that the 300 meter long building was to function as a noise deflector at least 13 m high, and also provide a cantilevered roof for column free bus parking area.

The Terminal Connector represents an unconventional solution to an unconventional design challenge. It is a prime example showing how a well thought out architectural solution can combine government regulations, technical enhancements and client requirements and actually improve a facility in all aspects with one expressive move. Also structurally the building is unusual, as more than 50% of the cross section is cantilevered. The curved steel construction forms distinct pointed arches, which has resulted in many public nicknames such as the “Whale” or the “Cathedral”.

Daylight is an active contributor to the experience as the traveller moves through the connector. As the natural light and the weather changes, light is reflected off the exposed structure through carefully placed windows and skylights adding an extra dimension as well as a clear sense of »Airside« and »Landside«.

The Terminal Connector is an example of tight collaboration between Client, Contractor, Architect and other consultants to deliver a technically demanding project with a compressed schedule.

Terminal Conection / Danielsen Courtesy of Danielsen
Terminal Conection / Danielsen Courtesy of Danielsen
Terminal Conection / Danielsen Courtesy of Danielsen
Terminal Conection / Danielsen Courtesy of Danielsen
Terminal Conection / Danielsen Courtesy of Danielsen
Terminal Conection / Danielsen Courtesy of Danielsen
Terminal Conection / Danielsen Courtesy of Danielsen
Terminal Conection / Danielsen Courtesy of Danielsen
Terminal Conection / Danielsen Courtesy of Danielsen
Terminal Conection / Danielsen Courtesy of Danielsen
Terminal Conection / Danielsen Courtesy of Danielsen
Terminal Conection / Danielsen Courtesy of Danielsen
Terminal Conection / Danielsen Courtesy of Danielsen
Terminal Conection / Danielsen Courtesy of Danielsen
Terminal Conection / Danielsen Courtesy of Danielsen
Terminal Conection / Danielsen Courtesy of Danielsen
Terminal Conection / Danielsen Section
Terminal Conection / Danielsen Section
Terminal Conection / Danielsen Plan
Terminal Conection / Danielsen Detail
Terminal Conection / Danielsen Sketch

Terminal Conection / Danielsen originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 01 Jun 2013.

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Hotel + Congress Center Proposal / OOIIO

OOIIO Architecture shared with us ‘Unbalance Hotel’, their latest project for a landmark hotel and congress building in Lima, Perú. Located in a city which is currently enjoying a constant growth, the interesting topography is what the architects decided to take advantage of to start the hotel design. The outstanding building silhouette immediately grabs pedestrian’s attention and it becomes an actual landmark for the more than 8 million inhabitants of Lima, and the whole country of Peru. More images and architects’ description after the break.

We have designed this singular hotel for a Latin American promoter interested in creating a unique, innovative and worldwide recognizable building with a moderate investment. The plot is located in front of the Pacific Ocean, in a quiet area outside of the city center, hanging on a cliff with a relative height that appears due to the proximity of the Andes to the Pacific Ocean. 

A hotel with these characteristics and dimensions constructed in a traditional way would be a visual barrier, so we bet on a frame building that hosts a huge program that could block the ocean´s view, but thanks to its peculiar shape, the landscape is now even more relevant, we have framed it! And the observer will appreciate both, sea and land through our building.

The building has 125 rooms but there are an important percentage dedicated to restaurants, conference rooms, meeting rooms, exhibitions, etc. the unique building´s shape will be the perfect “frame” to attract people and activities into it. This hotel achieves an extra profitability due to the surprising, interesting and original design.

Architects: OOIIO Architecture
Location: Lima, Perú
Team: Joaquín Millán Villamuelas, Lourdes Martinez Nieto, Cristina Vicario del Cojo, Patricia Moreno Blasco
Area: 16,070 m2

Hotel + Congress Center Proposal / OOIIO Courtesy of OOIIO Architecture
Hotel + Congress Center Proposal / OOIIO Courtesy of OOIIO Architecture
Hotel + Congress Center Proposal / OOIIO Courtesy of OOIIO Architecture
Hotel + Congress Center Proposal / OOIIO Courtesy of OOIIO Architecture
Hotel + Congress Center Proposal / OOIIO Courtesy of OOIIO Architecture
Hotel + Congress Center Proposal / OOIIO model 01
Hotel + Congress Center Proposal / OOIIO model 02
Hotel + Congress Center Proposal / OOIIO model 03
Hotel + Congress Center Proposal / OOIIO model 04
Hotel + Congress Center Proposal / OOIIO model 05
Hotel + Congress Center Proposal / OOIIO model 06
Hotel + Congress Center Proposal / OOIIO model 07
Hotel + Congress Center Proposal / OOIIO floor plans 01
Hotel + Congress Center Proposal / OOIIO floor plans 02
Hotel + Congress Center Proposal / OOIIO floor plans 03
Hotel + Congress Center Proposal / OOIIO level 10 plan and section
Hotel + Congress Center Proposal / OOIIO sections
Hotel + Congress Center Proposal / OOIIO diagram 01
Hotel + Congress Center Proposal / OOIIO diagram 02

Hotel + Congress Center Proposal / OOIIO originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 01 Jun 2013.

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Taringa House / Loucas Zahos Architects

Architects: Loucas Zahos Architects
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Architect In Charge: Loucas Zahos Architects
Design Team: Con Zahos, George Hazell
Area: 509 sqm
Photographs: Christopher Frederick Jones

Builder: Gray Construction Group
Engineer: Geo Consulting
Landscaping: Conlon Birrell Landscape Architects
Interiors: Eileen Middleton Interior Design

The Taringa house, originally a four-room worker’s cottage is located along Stanley Terrace, a traditional street lined with character housing in an inner west suburb of Brisbane. Topographically, the street follows the natural ridge line of the area. The site falls away from the street, sloping to the rear boundary. This rear boundary is bordered by a creek and lined with sub-tropical vegetation. These landscape conditions are common to many of the properties that run parallel to Stanley Terrace.

Concept

The program, driven by the desire to accommodate the majority of family activity within the addition, has generated two juxtaposed but contrasting building forms defined in this text as the ‘old’ and the ‘new’.

Pragmatically, the ‘old’ cottage functions as an entrance from street level, also accommodating a guest bedroom, bathroom and overflow living space. The ‘new’ addition is the core of everyday living in the house. It contains the kitchen, main living area, dining and bedrooms. The existing cottage and the addition are articulated as separate identities. The cottage retains its principal role of addressing the street and tying into the existing street fabric. The addition faces the rear of the site and celebrates the landscape.  The functions of the old and the new remain distinct; public and private, street and backyard, visitor and family, entry and living. The cottage retains much of its original detail, whilst the addition is contemporary in form, which is not immediately  apparent from the street.

Topography and Section

A priority within the brief was to ensure connectivity between the living spaces and the natural ground. Sites that fall away from the street, often allow entry at ground level at the front of the site, however, as the site slopes, result in indoor and outdoor living areas to the rear of the site raised high above natural ground and disconnected from the ground. This relationship to the natural ground was resolved through an internal staircase, which strings the point of entry at the cottage to the main living area at the lower level. The circulation spine begins as a small insertion at the entrance to the cottage, unfolding to become an intrinsic part of the new addition.  Connecting the two contrasting building forms, the circulation spine creates a ceremonial entrance from the existing cottage at the top of the site.

A key element of the existing landscape is an existing Jacaranda tree located almost in the centre of the site. The Jacaranda has been retained and celebrated as a focal point to the addition. A double height glazed living area central to the addition opens out to the Jacaranda and sub-tropical vegetation of the backyard, blurring the boundaries between inside and out.

Accommodating the main living space in proximity to the natural ground level has meant that the addition has been cut into the slope on the high side of the site. This has created a single storey structure where the addition meets the adjacent existing cottage that matches the scale of the cottage.

A second entry at the mezzanine level between the existing cottage and the addition becomes a functional entrance, allowing access to parking underneath the existing cottage whilst also mediating between the old and the new.

Taringa House / Loucas Zahos Architects © Christopher Frederick Jones
Taringa House / Loucas Zahos Architects © Christopher Frederick Jones
Taringa House / Loucas Zahos Architects © Christopher Frederick Jones
Taringa House / Loucas Zahos Architects © Christopher Frederick Jones
Taringa House / Loucas Zahos Architects © Christopher Frederick Jones
Taringa House / Loucas Zahos Architects © Christopher Frederick Jones
Taringa House / Loucas Zahos Architects © Christopher Frederick Jones
Taringa House / Loucas Zahos Architects © Christopher Frederick Jones
Taringa House / Loucas Zahos Architects © Christopher Frederick Jones
Taringa House / Loucas Zahos Architects © Christopher Frederick Jones
Taringa House / Loucas Zahos Architects © Christopher Frederick Jones
Taringa House / Loucas Zahos Architects Floor Plan
Taringa House / Loucas Zahos Architects Floor Plan
Taringa House / Loucas Zahos Architects Floor Plan
Taringa House / Loucas Zahos Architects Elevation

Taringa House / Loucas Zahos Architects originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 01 Jun 2013.

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The Old Market Square Stage / 5468796 Architecture

Architects: 5468796 Architecture
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba
Area: 784 sqm
Year: 2010
Photographs: James Brittain

“The Old Market Square Stage”, (otherwise known as “The Cube”) is an open-air performance venue situated in Old Market Square, an iconic green space and summer festival hub in Winnipeg’s historic Exchange District. In 2009, 5468796 Architecture won an invited competition with a multi-functional design that throws out the old bandshell concept on the grounds that when a conventional stage is not in use it would look forlorn – especially through the city’s long winters.

A concrete cube enclosed by a flexible metal membrane, The Cube functions as a multipurpose environment. The membrane is composed of 20,000 identical hollow aluminum pieces strung together on aircraft cables. The orientation of the pieces alternates, forming a flexible and shimmering curtain – a contemporary take on medieval chain mail, that can stand like a wall, be pulled in to reveal the performance space, or function as a light-refracting surface – allowing it to morph into a projection screen, performance venue, shelter or sculptural object. The curtain’s flexibility also allows for acoustical fine tuning.

Internal lighting refracts through the mesh so that the The Cube softly glows on the outside. An internal projector also enables images to be projected on the front curtain. The membrane’s diamond extrusions capture and refract light and images to their outer surface, creating a unique pixel matrix for artists to appropriate at will.

The Old Market Square Stage / 5468796 Architecture © James Brittain
The Old Market Square Stage / 5468796 Architecture © James Brittain
The Old Market Square Stage / 5468796 Architecture © James Brittain
The Old Market Square Stage / 5468796 Architecture © James Brittain
The Old Market Square Stage / 5468796 Architecture © James Brittain
The Old Market Square Stage / 5468796 Architecture © James Brittain
The Old Market Square Stage / 5468796 Architecture © James Brittain
The Old Market Square Stage / 5468796 Architecture © James Brittain
The Old Market Square Stage / 5468796 Architecture © James Brittain
The Old Market Square Stage / 5468796 Architecture © James Brittain
The Old Market Square Stage / 5468796 Architecture © James Brittain
The Old Market Square Stage / 5468796 Architecture © James Brittain
The Old Market Square Stage / 5468796 Architecture © James Brittain
The Old Market Square Stage / 5468796 Architecture © James Brittain
The Old Market Square Stage / 5468796 Architecture © James Brittain
The Old Market Square Stage / 5468796 Architecture © James Brittain
The Old Market Square Stage / 5468796 Architecture © James Brittain
The Old Market Square Stage / 5468796 Architecture © James Brittain
The Old Market Square Stage / 5468796 Architecture Detail
The Old Market Square Stage / 5468796 Architecture Diagram
The Old Market Square Stage / 5468796 Architecture Diagram
The Old Market Square Stage / 5468796 Architecture Model

The Old Market Square Stage / 5468796 Architecture originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 31 May 2013.

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