Vivienda familiar en Ohio

sh_300613_02

Seguir leyendo…

Madong Masterplan Winning Proposal / HYHW Architects

Madong Masterplan Winning Proposal / HYHW Architects Courtesy of HYHW & Space Syntax

Designed by HYHW Architects and Planners, the local development strategy and strategic focus of the Madong Masterplan is aimed at building upon history, automotive culture, sports culture, encouraging advances in manufacturing and modern services, with cultural charmand continual innovation in a technologically advanced green city. Serviced by a highway to the North and with Jiading Forest to the South-West, it benefits from convenient transport connections and the close proximity to the ecological landscape. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Jiading district in the Northwest of Shanghai is an important node in the Yangtze River Delta region and is Shanghai’s most significant automotive industrial base. Our site, Madong District situated within Jiading New Town, is located in the East of the future center. With careful consideration of the site conditions (through research of densities and traffic flow) and the proximity of the natural resources, the masterplan’s orientation and connections are determined for maximum benefit.

Synthesizing the local development strategy of Shanghai City and our design goals of creating a dense, mixed-use development at a human scale, we strive for a seamless connection into the existing infrastructure and the preservation and utilization of natural resources to ensure that Madong District is a self sustaining, vibrant area of Jiading.

The area will be developed as a water town taking advantage of existing waterways. It is a compact, multi-nodal, mixed-use modern center of high density: home to small businesses, cultural facilities, hotels and mixed housing connected by waterways and pedestrian paths, creating a vibrant, inhabited space.

The waters edge is one of the most important parts in the landscape design, and the most active element in the area. The main planning objective is to create a modern form with traditional features of a water town, linked by a network of routes to ensure full integration into the urban fabric promoting positive movement through all spaces.

Architects: HYHW Architects
Location: Shanghai, China
Consulting Company: Space Syntax Ltd
Client: Shanghai Planning Bureau & Shanghai Jiading Planning Bureau
Area: 14.5 sqkm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Courtesy of HYHW & Space Syntax

Madong Masterplan Winning Proposal / HYHW Architects Courtesy of HYHW & Space Syntax
Madong Masterplan Winning Proposal / HYHW Architects Courtesy of HYHW & Space Syntax
Madong Masterplan Winning Proposal / HYHW Architects Courtesy of HYHW & Space Syntax
Madong Masterplan Winning Proposal / HYHW Architects Courtesy of HYHW & Space Syntax
Madong Masterplan Winning Proposal / HYHW Architects Courtesy of HYHW & Space Syntax
Madong Masterplan Winning Proposal / HYHW Architects Courtesy of HYHW & Space Syntax
Madong Masterplan Winning Proposal / HYHW Architects masterplan
Madong Masterplan Winning Proposal / HYHW Architects regional plan
Madong Masterplan Winning Proposal / HYHW Architects local plan
Madong Masterplan Winning Proposal / HYHW Architects land use plan 01
Madong Masterplan Winning Proposal / HYHW Architects land use plan 02
Madong Masterplan Winning Proposal / HYHW Architects schematic diagram
Madong Masterplan Winning Proposal / HYHW Architects edges
Madong Masterplan Winning Proposal / HYHW Architects site photos

Madong Masterplan Winning Proposal / HYHW Architects originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 30 Jun 2013.

send to Twitter | Share on Facebook | What do you think about this?

MGM, Teatro Ramos Carrión en Zamora

Situado en el centro histórico de Zamora, el teatro Ramos Carrión, inaugurado en 1916, es un edificio modernista que ha sufrido diversas vicisitudes a lo largo del siglo xx. Durante una época se acondicionó como sala de cine…


Egipto queda desgarrado tras las manifestaciones contra Morsi

Cientos de manifestantes protestan esta mañana contra el presidente egipcio, Mohamed Morsi, tras haber pernoctado en tiendas de campaña en la cairota plaza Tahrir, mientras…


Architect Rem Koolhaas on London’s skyline

Rem Koolhaas discusses the London skyline, the future of the creative development of cities and the politics of building design. Koolhaas tells John Plunkett…


Architect Rem Koolhaas on London’s skyline

Rem Koolhaas discusses the London skyline, the future of the creative development of cities and the politics of building design. Koolhaas tells John Plunkett…


Ferrum House / Mark Merer + Landhouse

Ferrum House / Mark Merer + Landhouse © Louis Porter

Architects: Mark Merer, Landhouse
Location: Bruton, England, UK
Client: Andrew Pennock & Dana Anderson
Area: 211 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Louis Porter

The design consists of a SIPs construction with Timber cladding on the ground floor and Corten steel cladding on the 1st and 2nd floors.

The building sits alongside an old bacon factory which has been converted into flats. Corten steel was chosen to echo the industrial heritage of the site while sitting comfortably with the stone wall of the old factory on the east boundary of the site.

The steel cube is set back from the road and sits on top of the chard timber clad ground floor which overall shape infill’s the site from west to east. This has the affect of the top 2 floors or the cube seeming as though it is perched on the timber base which is further enhanced by projecting the northern end of the building over the front entrance.

Ferrum House / Mark Merer + Landhouse © Louis Porter
Ferrum House / Mark Merer + Landhouse © Louis Porter
Ferrum House / Mark Merer + Landhouse © Louis Porter
Ferrum House / Mark Merer + Landhouse © Louis Porter
Ferrum House / Mark Merer + Landhouse © Louis Porter
Ferrum House / Mark Merer + Landhouse © Louis Porter
Ferrum House / Mark Merer + Landhouse © Louis Porter
Ferrum House / Mark Merer + Landhouse © Louis Porter
Ferrum House / Mark Merer + Landhouse © Louis Porter
Ferrum House / Mark Merer + Landhouse © Louis Porter
Ferrum House / Mark Merer + Landhouse © Louis Porter
Ferrum House / Mark Merer + Landhouse © Louis Porter
Ferrum House / Mark Merer + Landhouse © Louis Porter
Ferrum House / Mark Merer + Landhouse © Louis Porter
Ferrum House / Mark Merer + Landhouse © Louis Porter
Ferrum House / Mark Merer + Landhouse © Louis Porter
Ferrum House / Mark Merer + Landhouse First Floor Plan
Ferrum House / Mark Merer + Landhouse Second Floor Plan
Ferrum House / Mark Merer + Landhouse Ground Floor Plan
Ferrum House / Mark Merer + Landhouse North Elevation
Ferrum House / Mark Merer + Landhouse West Elevation
Ferrum House / Mark Merer + Landhouse South Elevation
Ferrum House / Mark Merer + Landhouse East Elevation

Ferrum House / Mark Merer + Landhouse originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 30 Jun 2013.

send to Twitter | Share on Facebook | What do you think about this?

‘Party Wall’ by CODA: Winner of the 2013 Young Architects Program at MoMA PS1

CODA: Winner of the 2013 Young Architects Program at MoMA PS1

The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1 in New York City have announced that CODA, Caroline O’Donnell in Ithaca, NY, is the winner of the annual Young Architects Program. Now in its 14th edition, the Young Architects Program (YAP) at MoMA and MoMA PS1 is committed to offering emerging architectural talent the opportunity to […]

We Made 2012: A Look Back at the London Olympics

On July 9th, The Building Centre will debut “We Made 2012″, an exhibition that looks back at the venues, landscape and legacy that made up the London 2012 Olympic Games and the individuals and organizations that made it possible. The exhibition celebrates the UK construction industry composed of architects, engineers, manufacturers, suppliers, and contractors.  It was made possible partially because the on January 27, 2013 the British Olympic Association launched the ‘Suppliers Recognition Scheme’ which allowed members of the construction industry to apply for a free license, which, once issued, allowed participants to talk freely about their contributions.

“We Made 2012″ looks at the Games as they have contributed to the legacy of Britain, through the urban planning, architecture and influx of tourism during the Games and after them.   In East London, for example, the games acted as a catalyst for urban regeneration.  The Queen Elizabeth II Park will be opening on July 27th, on the anniversary of the Opening Ceremony, in a part of the city once derelict and industrial.  Today it is accessible as parkland, waterways and cultural spaces of landmark venues.

The exhibition will include film, photography, architectural models, and sketches to relate the story of the Olympic Games and their influence.  It will provide a closer look at the components and materials of the structures that made up the Olympic Village such as the Velodrome’s distinctive cable-net roof.

In early 2013, We Made 2012 and The Building Centre called for entries to the exhibition.  Any companies involved in the planning, design or construction of a London Olympic project was invited to participate.  This included permanent or temporary structures, infrastructure, and work on the legacy stage.  The entries were assessed by a panel of former LOCOG officials, The Building Centre and key personnel to ensure that the participants that were accepted into the exhibition would provide a high quality presentation for the website and exhibition.  Each entry was regarded as a Case Study and were collected until the 31st of May.

The selected case studies, that are to be featured at the exhibition, will also be available in an online directory at http://www.wemade2012.co.uk/ at the launch of the exhibit.  The organizers will also launch a series of talks that will run parallel to the show.

Making a Legacy @ The Building Centre: July 11, 2013 8:30am – 9am
Jerome Frost, Arup; Simon Fraser, Allies and Morrison; Andrew Harland, LDA ; Chaired by Selina Mason, LLDC

Venues @ The Building Centre: July 24, 2013 8:30am – 9am
Mike Taylor, Hopkins; Stanton Williams; Chaired by Alex Lifschutz, Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands

Power and Waste @ The Building Centre: July 31, 2013 8:30am – 9am
Kay Hughes

Designing for Fun @ The Building Centre: August 6, 2013 8:30am – 9am

More info at http://www.buildingcentre.co.uk/ and http://www.wemade2012.co.uk/

We Made 2012: A Look Back at the London Olympics originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 30 Jun 2013.

send to Twitter | Share on Facebook | What do you think about this?

San Francisco To Transform City with Eco-Districts

San Francisco's Eco-Districts, Starting with the Central Corridor San Francisco; Photo Courtesy of Flickr User KP Tripathi

San Francisco’s Planning Department is working with California’s sustainability guidelines to structure growth within the city in accordance with the state’s requirements and the city’s goals through the department’s Sustainability Development Program.  The program aims to reduce water consumption, reduce waste and enhance community-scale energy resources.  To aid in the fulfillment of these goals, the program is implementing a tool called Eco-Districts – a community of property owners, businesses and residents within a neighborhood that collaborate to develop and initiate sustainable development projects in their area.  Using a set of performance metrics, neighborhoods can shape their projects with custom strategies for their community.

The Eco-District is fundamentally a community-driven development that has the potential to achieve the smart growth of sustainable ideas but also build local urban identity and enforce a sense of place among its residents.  The Eco-District movement has already taken shape in Austin (TX), Boston (MA), Seattle (WA),  Washington DC, and Portland (OR) in various degrees of development.  San Francisco’s adoption of this tool will help drive the successes of the Sustainability Development Program with a focus on holistic approaches of neighborhood development and support with environmentally conscious improvements.

Read on for more on San Francisco’s Eco-Districts.

San Francisco’s Planning Department has identified four types of Eco-Districts: The Blank Slate, The Patchwork Quilt, The Strengthened Neighborhood and the Industrial Network.  Eco-Districts have a developed roadmap:  establishing the framework, organizing government and community engagement, assessment, and policy and finance, which is ultimately distributed to projects concerning buildings and infrastructure and people and education. However, within this general framework, each Eco-District typology has a unique set of steps and guides that work best for the quality and character of existing development.

The Blank Slate sounds exactly like what it is.  This type of eco-district is typically composed of swaths of undeveloped land owned by a single property owner.  The development of this type of eco-district allows for the accommodation of the most basic infrastructural elements in accordance with sustainability practices that includes energy, water, and waste infrastructure systems built in preparation for eventual vertical development.  It can also be thought to provide the most optimal and comprehensive sustainable development.

The Patchwork Quilt is a combination of undeveloped, underdeveloped and developed land owned by different property owners.  Projects may also be developing under different time frames in this type of Eco-District, creating a neighborhood in constant flux.  The planning department focuses on aligning the development time frames of various projects within the Eco-District to maximize infrastructural improvements within the frame of environmental goals.  It works closely with the community to build improvements within the context of the existing neighborhood character, as well as integrate the physical qualities of the neighborhood.

The Strengthened Neighborhood consists of already developed and supported residential communities and their commercial corridors.  The strategy for this type of Eco-Districts is to support eco-friendly behavior and provide guides for improvements rather than growth.  These improvements are considered within the context of the already developed character of the neighborhood.

The Industrial Network type of Eco-District focuses closely at the connections between the city’s production, distribution and repair uses.  In this case the planning department focuses on streamlining these industries and development efficient systems by which these different facets of industry can work together.

The first Eco-Districts to be developed by San Francisco’s Planning Department is the Central Corridor, a Type 2 Patchwork Quilt District identified for redevelopment in August 2012.  As the 24-square-block area of the neighborhood currently undergoes planning and rezoning to accommodate the new Central Subway, a growing urban population and its economic viability, it was selected to be developed using Eco-District strategy.  In an article on SPUR, Sustainable Development Policy Director Laura Tam, details the diversity of opportunity that the Central Corridor offers for public and private investment and the areas which would benefit from sustainable development on the neighborhood scale.

The Central Corridor Eco-District is in its first stages of development with the first phase being to organize a neighborhood governing entity to manage district sustainable and identify how it will progress.  As a whole, the Eco-District is aiming to meet the city’s environmental goals of greenhouse gas reductions, zero waste, water conservation and efficiency, storm water management, renewable energy, transportation and more.  Tam mentions that the “‘all-of-the-above, everywhere’ approach” to sustainable development may falter here, which is why the focus of the Eco-District will help orient its efficiency.  ”Some things stand out as real possibilities to accelerate sustainability,” she writes, “In these cases, proximity to a specific project or opportunity — and to property owners interested in making it happen — could make all the difference.”

Among these advantages is the opportunity to aggregate resources to invest in energy and water systems – community shared solar development, on site water treatment, recycling water, waste management, or street landscape irrigation.  The Eco-District Organizations also have the potential to reach out to private property owners and help coordinate their sustainability development within the context of the neighborhood.

Some specific ideas already emerged concerning the Central Corridor’s development.  One idea is to implement stormwater collection through the foundations of existing and proposed buildings that are below the water table, diverting this excess water from entering the sewer system.  Another example is implementing storm water collection under Highway 80 that runs through the district, where it could be captured and redirected to community and rooftop gardens.  Like the proposals from Under the Elevated by the Design Trust, this could be an opportunity to host infrastructural facilities under an underused infrastructural asset.  The city has released a Draft Plan in April 2013 for public review, using community engagement to contribute to the planning development.

Optimizing the sustainable improvements of the Central Corridor, and future Eco-Districts, requires analyzing the existing conditions and their potential development.  This includes analysis of the existing built-up conditions as well as the environmental factors, such as solar and wind analysis, water flow, energy use and heat gain.  These factors play into the future assessment and development of sustainable systems that can then be introduced to private and public investors.  Ultimately, the success of Eco-District’s implementation rests on collaboration between the city’s planning department and the stakeholders willing to participate in the development of sustainable neighborhoods.

via San Francisco Planning Department and SPUR

San Francisco To Transform City with Eco-Districts originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 30 Jun 2013.

send to Twitter | Share on Facebook | What do you think about this?