Museum of Underwater Antiquities Competition Entry / Charry C. Bougadellis & Associate Architects + Georges Batzios Architects

Designed by Charry C. Bougadellis & Associate Architects + Georges Batzios Architects, their proposal for the Piraeus Museum of Underwater Antiquities, which received an honorable mention, was divided in two elements based on the notion of ‘Viollet-le-Duc’: the negative element being the void, whilst the positive being the vertical and horizontal elements that define a space (walls and slabs). The link between these two elements, which defines the unity of the space is man. Therefore, the architectural space cannot be applied without the presence of man. More images and architects’ description after the break.

The change of use of the industrial Silo building into a Museum of Underwater Antiquities posed two parametric challenges. On the one hand, we had to create a functional architectural space for the public and on the other hand, to showcase the industrial functionality of the building towards the observer. Thus we engaged with contemporary and open-minded archaeologists. As ‘architects’, we had to change the building’s scale, reducing it from the size of the ‘machine’ to the size of ‘man’, without betraying the machine since as ‘archaeologists’ it was our duty to expose and highlight it in all its mechanical glory.

The deep incision which we applied through the center of the building was the optimum solution in solving these two challenges. It exposes the Silo’s industrial functionality whilst providing it with an architectural identity. This application resulted in the creation of a large central space which invites one to the reach the ‘heart’ of this building’s industrial architectural identity; an atrium; a deep fissure; the sea bed? This interpretation has an imminent impact on the visitor, on their sensitivity and their fears, their unconsciousness and their logic thought process, causing them to send out their own ‘signals’ that are activated by the building.

The ‘Industrial Park’ of the second phase of the project was divided in two areas. The first park was orientated towards the port and given a Metropolitan identity in order to relate to the millions of tourists which pass by the port of Piraeus each year whilst also geared towards the local residents of the area. The park’s form expresses the building’s previous role and industrial production, whilst the fissures take on the role of restoring the park back to the historical shoreline, along the ancient harbor wall. All elements beyond this shoreline are deconstructed into either submerged water parks or large sloped platforms ideal for various cultural events.

Therefore the Silo building becomes the feature attraction of Piraeus’ new cultural coast line. The second park along the north side of the site, between the shoreline and Kekropos Avenue, was given an urban character, targeted mainly towards the local residents of the nearby area. Positioned in front of the city and next to the proposed Museum of Immigration, the new park takes on elements from the local architecture and from the surrounding city context. It is organized based on the Hippodameian urban planning system, which is already evident in this section of urban fabric, whilst relating to the notions of immigration.

Architects: Charry C. Bougadellis & Associate Architects  + Georges Batzios Architects
Location: Piraeus, Greece
Architectural Team: Antonios Zambelis, Christos Choudeloudis, Richard Nicholas Sather, Vasiliki Theodoraki, Elena Stamouli, Aikaterini – Laoura Tsitouridou , Lyda Driva
Structural Engineers: Eblecton
Biologist: Antonios Skordilis
Landscape Strategist: Sagik Barbarian
Energy Study: 3Genergy, G. Iliadis and Co
Competition Result: Honorable mention

Museum of Underwater Antiquities Competition Entry / Charry C. Bougadellis & Associate Architects  + Georges Batzios Architects Courtesy of harry C. Bougadellis & Associate Architects  + Georges Batzios Architects
Museum of Underwater Antiquities Competition Entry / Charry C. Bougadellis & Associate Architects  + Georges Batzios Architects Ippodamian park
Museum of Underwater Antiquities Competition Entry / Charry C. Bougadellis & Associate Architects  + Georges Batzios Architects entrance 01
Museum of Underwater Antiquities Competition Entry / Charry C. Bougadellis & Associate Architects  + Georges Batzios Architects entrance 02
Museum of Underwater Antiquities Competition Entry / Charry C. Bougadellis & Associate Architects  + Georges Batzios Architects exterior entrance
Museum of Underwater Antiquities Competition Entry / Charry C. Bougadellis & Associate Architects  + Georges Batzios Architects seabed 01
Museum of Underwater Antiquities Competition Entry / Charry C. Bougadellis & Associate Architects  + Georges Batzios Architects seabed 02
Museum of Underwater Antiquities Competition Entry / Charry C. Bougadellis & Associate Architects  + Georges Batzios Architects expo 01
Museum of Underwater Antiquities Competition Entry / Charry C. Bougadellis & Associate Architects  + Georges Batzios Architects expo 02
Museum of Underwater Antiquities Competition Entry / Charry C. Bougadellis & Associate Architects  + Georges Batzios Architects piloti
Museum of Underwater Antiquities Competition Entry / Charry C. Bougadellis & Associate Architects  + Georges Batzios Architects concept
Museum of Underwater Antiquities Competition Entry / Charry C. Bougadellis & Associate Architects  + Georges Batzios Architects plans
Museum of Underwater Antiquities Competition Entry / Charry C. Bougadellis & Associate Architects  + Georges Batzios Architects sections
Museum of Underwater Antiquities Competition Entry / Charry C. Bougadellis & Associate Architects  + Georges Batzios Architects museology
Museum of Underwater Antiquities Competition Entry / Charry C. Bougadellis & Associate Architects  + Georges Batzios Architects photogram

Museum of Underwater Antiquities Competition Entry / Charry C. Bougadellis & Associate Architects + Georges Batzios Architects originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 31 Mar 2013.

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Meritxell Inaraja, La Seca Espai Escènic Brossa en Barcelona

La palabra ‘seca’ (en español, ‘ceca’) tiene su origen en la palabra árabe sekka y significa ‘lugar donde se fabrica moneda’. En Barcelona La Seca fue el nombre que tomó la Real Fábrica de Moneda de la Corona de Aragón, donde se acuñó desde el…


Los despojos de la Expo de Shanghái

Da pena caminar por el recinto de lo que fue la Exposición Universal de Shanghái. Nada más salir de la nueva estación de metro, ubicada al lado del pabellón de China…


El hombre que troceó el Empire State

La de veces que cambiaron de manos las tierras que John Thompson compró en Nueva York en lo que hoy es un espacio copado por grandes edificios…


Clausuran el estadio olímpico de Río de Janeiro

La Alcaldía de Río de Janeiro anunció el cierre temporal del estadio João Havelange, conocido como “Engenhão”, el más moderno de la ciudad y que será usado…


Sichang Road Teahouse / Miao Design Studio

Architects: Miao Design Studio
Location: Kunshan, China
Design Architect : Pu Miao
Local Architect: Shanghai Landscape Architecture Design Institute
Area: 300 sqm
Year: 2008
Photographs: Courtesy of Pu Miao

Landscape Architect: Zhuang Wei
Structure Engineer: Xu Man
Plumbing Consultant: Li Wen
Electrical Engineer: Zhou Leyan

This project tries to address a mega problem at a micro scale — the increasing isolation of chinese urban resisdents from nature. Kunshan is in the Yangtze River delta region, a flat land with lots of rainfall. Towns in the region historically developed a unique landscape of crisscross canals and numerous ponds. Traditional buildings were next to or even cantilevered over the canals. Unfortunately, the rapid urban expansion and renewal of the past three decades have not only made cities bigger, but also transformed such intricate urban water areas into six-lane streets and dense towers. Even though developers created some fountains in their projects, these features tend to be of dead water. Various regulations further keep people and buildings from any intimate contact with remaining rivers and lakes. As a result, today’s urban children often forget the feeling of natural water, along with earthworms and crickets, which are part of the symptoms of apathy towards nature in Chinese high-density cities.

The attempt was to alleviate this big problem with a small step – designing buildings that encourage people to develop an intimacy with natural water so that they will love nature more and demand a more holistic urban environment.

Located between an urban street and a preserved river in a new residential area of Kunshan, the design of the teahouse explored ways to allow users to truly be close to the water. The river level fluctuates greatly. Therefore we designed an intermediating pool that draws its water from the river. Viewed from the teahouse, the pool appears to merge with the river. A row of metasequoia trees along the river bank continues into the pool. Ten private tea rooms take the form of glass pods surrounded by water and are half-sunken into the pool. Users can open the windows and touch the water under their elbows, just like in a boat. Tiny fountains (drawing water from the river) are bubbling in the gaps between the pods. A layer of wood trellises with vines above the glass roof affords people the feeling of peeking into the bright river from under the dark shades. The design of the trellises also experimented on a double curved version of “flat curve”–a form often seen in traditional Chinese architecture- with a low-tech and low-cost method.

Sichang Road Teahouse / Miao Design Studio Courtesy of Pu Miao
Sichang Road Teahouse / Miao Design Studio Courtesy of Pu Miao
Sichang Road Teahouse / Miao Design Studio Courtesy of Pu Miao
Sichang Road Teahouse / Miao Design Studio Courtesy of Pu Miao
Sichang Road Teahouse / Miao Design Studio Courtesy of Pu Miao
Sichang Road Teahouse / Miao Design Studio Courtesy of Pu Miao
Sichang Road Teahouse / Miao Design Studio Courtesy of Pu Miao
Sichang Road Teahouse / Miao Design Studio Courtesy of Pu Miao
Sichang Road Teahouse / Miao Design Studio Courtesy of Pu Miao
Sichang Road Teahouse / Miao Design Studio Courtesy of Pu Miao
Sichang Road Teahouse / Miao Design Studio Section
Sichang Road Teahouse / Miao Design Studio First floor Plan
Sichang Road Teahouse / Miao Design Studio Site Plan

Sichang Road Teahouse / Miao Design Studio originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 31 Mar 2013.

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Especial: Casas en la Playa Parte V

Hoy presentamos otro resumen de Casas en la Playa publicadas en Tecnohaus. ¡Que lo disfruten!

Casa Roura Inostroza - Daniel Rojo
Casa Roura Inostroza – Daniel Rojo

Esta segunda vivienda se emplaza en un terreno con pendiente considerable (ladera sur) y con una vista privilegiada hacia el mar. (LEER MAS…)

Casa en Playa Las Gaviotas - Gomez de la Torre y Guerrero arqs
Casa en Playa Las Gaviotas – Gomez de la Torre y Guerrero arqs.

Esta casa se emplaza en la Playa Gaviotas , balneario de Asia.
Ubicada frente al mar, se desarrolla en un terreno de 230 m2, en dos niveles, primer piso (planta baja) y sótano, con un área techada de 215 m2. (LEER MAS…)

Casa en Huentelauquén - Izquierdo Lehmann
Casa en Huentelauquén – Izquierdo Lehmann

Esta casa de vacaciones está ubicada en un predio rural en la localidad de Huentelauquén, en la Cuarta Región, frente al mar, en el borde de una meseta barrida por el viento, levantada cuarenta metros sobre la playa. (LEER MAS…)

Casa La Ventolera - Estudio Valdes Arquitectos
Casa La Ventolera – Estudio Valdes Arquitectos

Esta casa de vacaciones, esta resuelta como un solo cuerpo construido, que contiene 2 viviendas para ser usadas por 3 generaciones de una misma familia, manteniendo condiciones de privacidad y relaciones de interdependencia bastante adaptables y libres, conforme a los patrones de convivencia que pueden establecerse entre padre, hijos y nietos. Una sola unidad contiene una “casa nodriza” y una menor que se nutre de la primera. (LEER MAS…)

Casa en Playa La Isla - Arq. Juan Carlos Doblado
Casa en Playa La Isla – Arq. Juan Carlos Doblado

La casa está ubicada frente al mar, con vista hacia las islas de Asia. El proyecto pretende evidenciar la conexión entre una arquitectura abstracta y su entorno, estableciendo una relación entre el hombre y la naturaleza, entre el desierto y el mar. (LEER MAS…)

Aqui pueden ver las reseñas anteriores:

Casas en la Playa Parte I
Casas en la Playa Parte II
Casas en la Playa Parte III
Casas en la Playa Parte IV



Diseño de Escaleras #54

Este post es parte de nuestra serie semanal con imagenes de escaleras que les serviran de inspiración para sus diseños, seleccionadas por Tecnohaus y por nuestros lectores.
Si quieres participar y compartir tu inspiración para el diseño en escaleras, envíanos tus imagenes, inspiración o lo que has hecho a Best Images (http://best-images.tumblr.com/submit), y no te olvides de enviar tu nombre, o bien a través de Twitter enviando a http://twitter.com/tecnohaus

Diseño de Escaleras #54

Tumblr

Diseño de Escaleras #54
Stairway of Light, 2002 by Hiroshi Sugimoto

Diseño de escaleras #54
Villa F by Hornung And Jacobi Architecture

Diseño de escaleras #54
Casa São Paulo – Arquiteto Paulo Mendes da Rocha

Diseño de escaleras #54
house in London by Paul McAneary Architects

Diseño de escaleras #54
Paulo Merlini | Dental clinic in Oporto | Lisboa, Portugal

aros

Diseño de escaleras #54
STEEL STAIRS

Diseño de escaleras #54
RESIDENCIA ITAHYE / APIACÁS ARQUITECTOS + BRITO ANTUNES ARQUITECTURA

msalas

Diseño de escaleras #54
DS JARDIM PAULISTA/ São Paulo,Brazil / Studio ArthurCasas

justthedesign

Diseño de escaleras #54
Staircase At The Lake Residence By Uptic Studios

Diseño de escaleras #54
Staircase At KAP By Komada Architects’ Office

Comparte tu inspiración para el diseño en escaleras, a través de Twitter enviando a http://twitter.com/tecnohaus #stairs

@blogyarq

Diseño de escaleras #54
Body House – Monolab

Diseño de escaleras #54
Body House – Monolab

Envíanos tus imagenes, inspiración o lo que has hecho a Best Images (http://best-images.tumblr.com/submit).

designed-for-life

Diseño de escaleras #54
Rooftop Apartment by Amitzi Architects

Diseño de escaleras #54
by Gisele Taranto

amadion

Diseño de escaleras #54
NYU Department of Philosophy – Steven Holl

architectureland

Diseño de escaleras #54
41 Cooper Square New York, USA by Morphosis Architects

subtilitas

Diseño de escaleras #54
Noname29 – Casa Alien, Cabo de las Huertas 2006. Via, photos (C) David Frutos.

Fragments of architecture

Diseño de escaleras #54
Casa Rural, San Vicente De La Sonsierra / Blur arquitectura

Diseño de escaleras #54
Interior Restoration of an Attic Duplex / Cavaa Arquitectes

cjwho

Diseño de escaleras #54
Watertower of Living by ZECC Architects

cabbagerose

Diseño de escaleras #54
Hewlett Street House, Bronte | Australia (by MPR Design Group)

detailsorientedbyshapepluspace

Diseño de escaleras #54

Tecnohaus

Diseño de escaleras #54
Residencia Utriai – Architectural Bureau G.Natkevicius & Partners

Diseño de escaleras #54
Casa en Menorca – Dom Arquitectura

Diseño de escaleras #54
Casa en la Cascada – Frank Lloyd Wright

Diseño de escaleras #54
Casa Castro Guevara – G arquitectos

Mas escaleras en:Diseño de Escaleras #53
En esta categoria especial:Escaleras



AD Recommends: Best of the Week

Five great projects from last week you can’t miss! Like the great House in Muko designed by Fujiwarramuro Architects or GLUCK+’s Urban Townhouse in New York. Check out the Monument for the 150th Anniversary of the Battle of Puebla, a beautiful wooden urban space by TEN Arquitectos. Finally, revisit the first built tower by Zaha Hadid Architects or the recently completed Queen Alia International Airport by Foster + Partners.

AD Recommends: Best of the Week originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 31 Mar 2013.

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FBI’s Brutalist Hoover Building Faces Serious Makeover

“Originally seen to reflect the democratic attributes of a powerful civic expression – authenticity, honesty, directness, strength – the forceful nature of Brutalist aesthetics eventually came to signify precisely the opposite: hostility, coldness, inhumanity. […] Separated from its original context and reduced in meaning, Brutalism became an all-too-easy pejorative, a term that suggests these buildings were designed with bad intentions.” – “BRUTAL”/“HEROIC” by Michael Kubo, Chris Grimley and Mark Pasnik

Brutalism, an architectural movement that peaked in the 1960′s, inspired the development of countless governmental buildings in Washington DC as well as across the world. Though Brutalism’s original intentions may have been good, many believe that the actual manifestation of these buildings was not and consider them to be little more than an eyesore on the District’s landscape. One such concrete structure, the FBI’s J. Hoover Building, is currently facing possible redevelopment as the government has decided to relocate FBI headquarters and given the private sector the rare opportunity to transform this so-called “monolith” into a new kind of monument.

More on the Hoover Building after the break…

Gregory Hoss, a partner at David M. Schwarz Architects, writes: “Instead of a monolith that has no connection to the cityscape, no rapport with people in and around it, and no relationship to its place on that grandest of all American boulevards, Pennsylvania Avenue, we can exercise an almost unheard-of prerogative to create something worthy of respect for generations to come.”

This is the vision that Hoss and other designers and developers have for the site of the Hoover Building – to create something “vital, vibrant and economically satisfying,” now that the General Services Administration and the District have stepped aside and put the building’s future into the public’s hands. It is indeed a unique chance to take a very large and complex building and re-imagine it into something new and worthy of its important location.

Hoss warns, however, that we must be careful to not design a building that meets or barely exceeds contemporary norms. As an example, he sites the repetitive glass and steel structures that have popped up along DC’s K Street within the past 10 years, all indistinguishable from each other and all equally uninspiring. He also explains that designers and developers will have to face challenges with the building’s enormous size and its re-integration into the existing neighborhood fabric, taking care to re-establish dozens of obliterated retail outlets. This would create a truly multi-functional and well-integrated space where people could live, work and be entertained.

But what does this mean for the futures of other Brutalist buildings? Will the development of the Hoover Building create a new trend of remodeling the Brutalist buildings of the world? And how can we be so sure that Brutalism is an invaluable movement that should be erased entirely?

References: The Washington Post 

FBI's Brutalist Hoover Building Faces Serious Makeover originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 31 Mar 2013.

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