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I’m in Stubbins (a smaller room) tonight for a lecture by GSD Professor in Residence I

Restaurant en Beijing


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Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry / Aétrangère

The Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) is an innovative urban space that explores the value of urban hybridization as a design opportunity to address sustainable and technological issues in the definition of the contemporary public space. The starting point for the proposal by Aétrangère was to introduce an innovative approach to reach the same goals envisioned by the Seattle Center Century 21 Master Plan. Instead of conceiving the demolitions, reconstructions, new buildings, the underground parking, and the major open space as separate elements, they allow some degree of integration for sustainable features we focused on defining this public space project starting from a sustainable approach. More images and architects’ description after the break.

While society is becoming more complex, two social dynamics could have an enormous incidence in the way that public space will perform in the future. People have a growing concern about environmental matters while an increasing access to information in real time ( and to the mobile media technologies that make it possible) are defying the classical conception of public space, redefining our expectations and confronting it to evolving demands for a wide range of new social experiences.

The HUB is called to be the most important public spaces near downtown Seattle, embodying its dynamic character and showcasing its strong sustainable identity. Harmonizing urban open space with landscape and ecology, and taking the introduction of an important amount of underground parking as an opportunity, The HUB represents by its strategic position in Seattle Center a great occasion to reconfigure the Euclidian spatial framework of the campus, creating an exceptional and lively metropolitan open space in a manner which is fundamentally different from the classical conception of public space as a void.

Hybridizing architecture, landscape, ecologies, urban space, and urban media technologies, we allow the surfacing of a new kind of open space, which can be defined as a modern and integrated modern urban catalyst. A solar ribbon canopy will evolve unifying the existing buildings, creating the new ones, shaping the main new open space, and finally defining urban paths and new ways of interaction to intensify the social gathering. This new American urban hybrid, will acts as a large scale campus hinge, introducing new dynamics in the classical and balanced grid structure of the campus.

A Linked Campus

The Hub main strategy consist in taking the new layer added to the site, the underground parking complex, to transform this huge source of visitors in a real new gate for the campus. While doing that, special attention was paid to enliven the two main East-West interfaces (the Key Arena / new stadium area). The key issue was to define a new appropriate urban scale for this access, considering the role and functions that the new public space will have.

Integrating the two different campus levels, the upper one (International Fountain) and the 5th Ave. N. entry level, the proposal reveals an exiting new landscape. A cascade of green fields is displayed: large terraces are completely horizontal allowing wide range of outdoors activities, and others are gently slopped serving as a natural amphitheater to enjoy concerts and have great views across the campus. This configuration provides access from the green fields to a new public frontage, revealing new public programs, allowing direct access from the parking level to the Center House roof terrace, and creating a real urban gate for the campus.

Enlivening the Future Today

What shall be the shape and the fingerprint of the ZERO CARBON economy in the most important big cities open spaces? As well as in 1962, Seattle Center must inspire today the upcoming generations in an innovating way, showcasing a comprehensive vision of what a lively and sustainable future could be. All scales concerning the urban experience must be involved by this vision: from urban furniture which harvest rain water, or urban lighting powered by wind energy to the retrofitting of the principal campus buildings, including on site solar energy production. Actions and strategies in every scale could be replicable transforming the existing campus by the joint action of its different actors.

The HUB proposal wants to anticipate Seattle Center green future in the core of its major public space. The legacy that this proposal wants to project forward is to sustain a blueprint for Seattle’s role as a global hotspot in sustainable issues for the next half-century. While the world is looking for alternatives to fossil fuels and CO2 reduction, Seattle has the potential to be a world leader in this raising Zero Carbon economy. Considering only its solar potential, Seattle receives more sunlight than Germany, the world leader in solar power.

People involvement and environmental awareness is the most important resource to create a resilient city and to foster people to take action the education has a major role to play. The HUB seeks to integrate emerging sustainable technologies into the public space. A solar canopy will integrate solar PV on its top. A greenhouse biome host exotic plants and trees from other latitudes enhancing knowledge and becoming a major hotspot of biodiversity for the Lake to Bay Loop (between Lake Union and Elliott Bay). This new program also integrates an urban Algae bioreactor, attracting a very wider public to discover it.

A Hub Between Physical and Virtual

Our experiences in today’s cities are no longer limited to physical spaces. From smart phones and wireless technologies, to GPS systems and social media, those evolving digital technologies are increasingly shape our everyday lives and our urban environment, turning our cities into ‘hybrid cities’. The HUB proposal seeks to overpass classical Euclidian paradigm to define a new kind of social interaction in this ‘sentient’ public space.

The solar canopy will create a unique interactive media device which reacts to its surrounding environment. While providing shelter and shadow for the visitors, it will input public space with Seattle Center’s ambient and social data, amplifying people’s experience in the public space (augmented reality). Those nodes of contact between virtual and physical space created under the canopy roof will display images, sound, videos, and information, enhancing new ways of urban dialogue and fostering a shared sense of belonging and a strong sense of place and ‘ownership’.

Architects: Aétrangère
Location: Seattle, Washington, United States
Project Leader: Mario Caceres
Team: Mario Caceres, Architect and Urban Planner; Christian Canonico, Architect and Engineer
Renderings: InIMAGEnable
Project Description: New main Public Space for Seattle Center
Type: Open International Ideas Competition
Client: Seattle Center Foundation
Program: Public space, parking, open air performance area, football stadium, sustainable facilities, office, exhibition space, retail, green area, restaurant, café
Site Area: 36,500 sqm
Project Area: 10,000 sqm
Scope: Architectural, Urban and Landscape Concept Design
Project Year: 2012

Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (1) Courtesy of Aétrangère
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (2) Courtesy of Aétrangère
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (3) Courtesy of Aétrangère
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (4) Courtesy of Aétrangère
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (5) Courtesy of Aétrangère
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (6) Courtesy of Aétrangère
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (7) Courtesy of Aétrangère
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (8) master plan
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (9) section 01
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (10) section 02
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (11) diagram 01
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (12) diagram 02
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (13) diagram 03
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (14) diagram 04
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (15) diagram 05
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (16) diagram 06
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (17) diagram 07
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (18) diagram 08
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (19) diagram 09

Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry / Aétrangère

The Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) is an innovative urban space that explores the value of urban hybridization as a design opportunity to address sustainable and technological issues in the definition of the contemporary public space. The starting point for the proposal by Aétrangère was to introduce an innovative approach to reach the same goals envisioned by the Seattle Center Century 21 Master Plan. Instead of conceiving the demolitions, reconstructions, new buildings, the underground parking, and the major open space as separate elements, they allow some degree of integration for sustainable features we focused on defining this public space project starting from a sustainable approach. More images and architects’ description after the break.

While society is becoming more complex, two social dynamics could have an enormous incidence in the way that public space will perform in the future. People have a growing concern about environmental matters while an increasing access to information in real time ( and to the mobile media technologies that make it possible) are defying the classical conception of public space, redefining our expectations and confronting it to evolving demands for a wide range of new social experiences.

The HUB is called to be the most important public spaces near downtown Seattle, embodying its dynamic character and showcasing its strong sustainable identity. Harmonizing urban open space with landscape and ecology, and taking the introduction of an important amount of underground parking as an opportunity, The HUB represents by its strategic position in Seattle Center a great occasion to reconfigure the Euclidian spatial framework of the campus, creating an exceptional and lively metropolitan open space in a manner which is fundamentally different from the classical conception of public space as a void.

Hybridizing architecture, landscape, ecologies, urban space, and urban media technologies, we allow the surfacing of a new kind of open space, which can be defined as a modern and integrated modern urban catalyst. A solar ribbon canopy will evolve unifying the existing buildings, creating the new ones, shaping the main new open space, and finally defining urban paths and new ways of interaction to intensify the social gathering. This new American urban hybrid, will acts as a large scale campus hinge, introducing new dynamics in the classical and balanced grid structure of the campus.

A Linked Campus

The Hub main strategy consist in taking the new layer added to the site, the underground parking complex, to transform this huge source of visitors in a real new gate for the campus. While doing that, special attention was paid to enliven the two main East-West interfaces (the Key Arena / new stadium area). The key issue was to define a new appropriate urban scale for this access, considering the role and functions that the new public space will have.

Integrating the two different campus levels, the upper one (International Fountain) and the 5th Ave. N. entry level, the proposal reveals an exiting new landscape. A cascade of green fields is displayed: large terraces are completely horizontal allowing wide range of outdoors activities, and others are gently slopped serving as a natural amphitheater to enjoy concerts and have great views across the campus. This configuration provides access from the green fields to a new public frontage, revealing new public programs, allowing direct access from the parking level to the Center House roof terrace, and creating a real urban gate for the campus.

Enlivening the Future Today

What shall be the shape and the fingerprint of the ZERO CARBON economy in the most important big cities open spaces? As well as in 1962, Seattle Center must inspire today the upcoming generations in an innovating way, showcasing a comprehensive vision of what a lively and sustainable future could be. All scales concerning the urban experience must be involved by this vision: from urban furniture which harvest rain water, or urban lighting powered by wind energy to the retrofitting of the principal campus buildings, including on site solar energy production. Actions and strategies in every scale could be replicable transforming the existing campus by the joint action of its different actors.

The HUB proposal wants to anticipate Seattle Center green future in the core of its major public space. The legacy that this proposal wants to project forward is to sustain a blueprint for Seattle’s role as a global hotspot in sustainable issues for the next half-century. While the world is looking for alternatives to fossil fuels and CO2 reduction, Seattle has the potential to be a world leader in this raising Zero Carbon economy. Considering only its solar potential, Seattle receives more sunlight than Germany, the world leader in solar power.

People involvement and environmental awareness is the most important resource to create a resilient city and to foster people to take action the education has a major role to play. The HUB seeks to integrate emerging sustainable technologies into the public space. A solar canopy will integrate solar PV on its top. A greenhouse biome host exotic plants and trees from other latitudes enhancing knowledge and becoming a major hotspot of biodiversity for the Lake to Bay Loop (between Lake Union and Elliott Bay). This new program also integrates an urban Algae bioreactor, attracting a very wider public to discover it.

A Hub Between Physical and Virtual

Our experiences in today’s cities are no longer limited to physical spaces. From smart phones and wireless technologies, to GPS systems and social media, those evolving digital technologies are increasingly shape our everyday lives and our urban environment, turning our cities into ‘hybrid cities’. The HUB proposal seeks to overpass classical Euclidian paradigm to define a new kind of social interaction in this ‘sentient’ public space.

The solar canopy will create a unique interactive media device which reacts to its surrounding environment. While providing shelter and shadow for the visitors, it will input public space with Seattle Center’s ambient and social data, amplifying people’s experience in the public space (augmented reality). Those nodes of contact between virtual and physical space created under the canopy roof will display images, sound, videos, and information, enhancing new ways of urban dialogue and fostering a shared sense of belonging and a strong sense of place and ‘ownership’.

Architects: Aétrangère
Location: Seattle, Washington, United States
Project Leader: Mario Caceres
Team: Mario Caceres, Architect and Urban Planner; Christian Canonico, Architect and Engineer
Renderings: InIMAGEnable
Project Description: New main Public Space for Seattle Center
Type: Open International Ideas Competition
Client: Seattle Center Foundation
Program: Public space, parking, open air performance area, football stadium, sustainable facilities, office, exhibition space, retail, green area, restaurant, café
Site Area: 36,500 sqm
Project Area: 10,000 sqm
Scope: Architectural, Urban and Landscape Concept Design
Project Year: 2012

Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (1) Courtesy of Aétrangère
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (2) Courtesy of Aétrangère
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (3) Courtesy of Aétrangère
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (4) Courtesy of Aétrangère
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (5) Courtesy of Aétrangère
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (6) Courtesy of Aétrangère
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (7) Courtesy of Aétrangère
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (8) master plan
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (9) section 01
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (10) section 02
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (11) diagram 01
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (12) diagram 02
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (13) diagram 03
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (14) diagram 04
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (15) diagram 05
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (16) diagram 06
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (17) diagram 07
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (18) diagram 08
Seattle Center HUB (Hybrid Urban Bioscape) Competition Entry (19) diagram 09

Boekenberg Park / OMGEVING

Architects: OMGEVING
Location: Deurne, Belgium
Year: 2012
Photographs: Courtesy of OMGEVING

Working in a historical context, of the continental Europe where the architecture of the past is still very much present, architects are often faced with the question of whether they should restore the physical or rehabilitate the conceptual. This question came to the fore in response to the combined decision of the city of Antwerp and the heritage committee to rehabilitate the historical Boekenberg Park in Deurne. Within the framework of a public-private partnership, the office OMGEVING was appointed to give shape to the new ambitions of the city.

Based on historical analysis of the site, architects and landscape designers have proposed to approach the new development within the conceptual framework of 18th century English Garden. The concept was to bring the visitor to the already narrated and carefully arranged romantic natural setting and to confront him with emotionally charged dramatic “events.”

Therefore the degenerated landscape had to be brought to its ideal form and 20th century concrete pool, transformed into a forest pond merging gently into its surroundings. Keeping in mind that the water quality must correspond with the current health and safety regulations, it was proposed to use an ecological water treatment technology which in turn allowed for a new aquatic ecosystem to be created.

Meanwhile, on the opposite side of the water three pavilions emerge. Designed as a group of independent artifacts, their forms evoke images of the dramatic rock formations seen in 18th century paintings of Hans Gude or Peter Balke. The gaps between them, like chasms between cliffs, gently frame the views of the old woods on the opposite side of the water.

This creative reinterpretation of the history allowed the architects to take action whilst maintaining respect for a site’s history, catering to the modern standards of comfort and sustainability.

Boekenberg Park / OMGEVING Courtesy of OMGEVING
Boekenberg Park / OMGEVING Courtesy of OMGEVING
Boekenberg Park / OMGEVING Courtesy of OMGEVING
Boekenberg Park / OMGEVING Courtesy of OMGEVING
Boekenberg Park / OMGEVING Courtesy of OMGEVING
Boekenberg Park / OMGEVING Courtesy of OMGEVING
Boekenberg Park / OMGEVING Courtesy of OMGEVING
Boekenberg Park / OMGEVING Courtesy of OMGEVING
Boekenberg Park / OMGEVING Courtesy of OMGEVING
Boekenberg Park / OMGEVING Courtesy of OMGEVING
Boekenberg Park / OMGEVING Courtesy of OMGEVING
Boekenberg Park / OMGEVING Courtesy of OMGEVING
Boekenberg Park / OMGEVING Courtesy of OMGEVING
Boekenberg Park / OMGEVING Ground Floor Plan
Boekenberg Park / OMGEVING Ground Floor Plan
Boekenberg Park / OMGEVING Ground Floor Plan
Boekenberg Park / OMGEVING Upper Floor Plan
Boekenberg Park / OMGEVING Site Plan
Boekenberg Park / OMGEVING Section
Boekenberg Park / OMGEVING North Facade
Boekenberg Park / OMGEVING West Facade
Boekenberg Park / OMGEVING South-West Facade
Boekenberg Park / OMGEVING South-East Facade
Boekenberg Park / OMGEVING East Facade
Boekenberg Park / OMGEVING Roof
Boekenberg Park / OMGEVING Roof
Boekenberg Park / OMGEVING Roof
Boekenberg Park / OMGEVING Foundation
Boekenberg Park / OMGEVING Foundation
Boekenberg Park / OMGEVING Foundation

Boekenberg Park / OMGEVING originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 31 Oct 2012.

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Ha muerto Gae Aulenti

La arquitecta italiana Gae Aulenti, autora del proyecto de reforma del Museo d’Orsay de París (1980-86), falleció a los 85 años en Milán (norte), informaron hoy los medios locales…


El nuevo auditorio de Renzo Piano abre sus puertas en L’Aquila

En el centro histórico de la ciudad italiana de L’Aquila, en el centro del país, se ha inaugurado el auditorio construido por Renzo Piano en colaboración con el milanés Alessandro Traldi. El proyecto tiene el propósito de revitalizar…


Ocasa / JENDRETZKI

Architects: JENDRETZKI
Location: Long Island City, New York, United States
Area: 1,800 sqm
Year: 2010
Photographs: Pablo Corradi

This re-imagining of an Ulrich Franzen masterpiece, delicately updates materials, and reconfigures its use adapting it for a corporate headquarters of a shipping company.

The division of the individual spaces generates the creation of volumes stand distant enough to structure so that its original features are still primary to the whole. The use of wood louver cladding provides for privacy and warmth to an otherwise steril office environment.

Ocasa / JENDRETZKI © Pablo Corradi
Ocasa / JENDRETZKI © Pablo Corradi
Ocasa / JENDRETZKI © Pablo Corradi
Ocasa / JENDRETZKI © Pablo Corradi
Ocasa / JENDRETZKI © Pablo Corradi
Ocasa / JENDRETZKI © Pablo Corradi
Ocasa / JENDRETZKI © Pablo Corradi
Ocasa / JENDRETZKI © Pablo Corradi
Ocasa / JENDRETZKI © Pablo Corradi
Ocasa / JENDRETZKI © Pablo Corradi
Ocasa / JENDRETZKI © Pablo Corradi
Ocasa / JENDRETZKI © Pablo Corradi
Ocasa / JENDRETZKI © Pablo Corradi
Ocasa / JENDRETZKI © Pablo Corradi
Ocasa / JENDRETZKI © Pablo Corradi
Ocasa / JENDRETZKI © Pablo Corradi
Ocasa / JENDRETZKI © Pablo Corradi
Ocasa / JENDRETZKI © Pablo Corradi
Ocasa / JENDRETZKI © Pablo Corradi
Ocasa / JENDRETZKI © Pablo Corradi
Ocasa / JENDRETZKI © Pablo Corradi
Ocasa / JENDRETZKI Plan
Ocasa / JENDRETZKI East Elevation
Ocasa / JENDRETZKI West Elevation
Ocasa / JENDRETZKI West Elevation
Ocasa / JENDRETZKI Section
Ocasa / JENDRETZKI Section

Ocasa / JENDRETZKI originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 31 Oct 2012.

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Happy Birthday, Zaha Hadid!

Today is the birthday of Iraqi-British architect, Zaha Hadid. Known for her sculptural designs and commanding demeanor, the renown female artist is turning 61 years old this Halloween.