Diseño de Escaleras #37



Este post es parte de nuestra serie semanal con imagenes de escaleras que les serviran de inspiración para sus diseños, seleccionadas por Tecnohaus y por nuestros lectores.
Si quieres participar y compartir tu inspiración para el diseño en escaleras, envíanos tus imagenes, inspiración o lo que has hecho a Best Images (http://best-images.tumblr.com/submit), y no te olvides de enviar tu nombre, o bien a través de Twitter enviando a http://twitter.com/tecnohaus

Diseño de Escaleras #37
Franken House By Bekhor Architecte.TumblrDiseño de Escaleras #37
House in Shimane, Japan by y+Mdo Design Office Co.
Diseño de escaleras #37
House in Tokio, Japan by Apollo Architects & Associates
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Old Bearhurst / Duggan Morris Architects
Diseño de escaleras #37
House in Las Estancias, México by Agustin Landa Ruilboa
Diseño de escaleras #37
House in Monterrey, Nuevo León, México by Agustin Landa Ruiloba
fragments of architectureDiseño de escaleras #37
Sticotti Residence / Alejandro Sticotti
Diseño de escaleras #37
Fez House / Alvaro Leite Siza Vieira
beverlyhillsbliss
Diseño de escaleras #37

justthedesign
Diseño de escaleras #37
Residence By Tzannes Associates
Diseño de escaleras #37
Yarra House In Melbourne Shot By Peter Bennetts
Comparte tu inspiración para el diseño en escaleras, a través de Twitter enviando a http://twitter.com/tecnohaus #stairs

@actiuDiseño de escaleras #37
PARQUE TECNOLÓGICO ACTIU proyecto certificado LEED® GOLD por el U.S. Green Building Council en 2011
@blogyarqDiseño de escaleras #37
Casa de la Colina – Johnston Marklee & Associates
iamamarkDiseño de escaleras #37

arosDiseño de escaleras #37
APOLLO ARCHITECTS AND ASSOCIATES: SBD25
urban-mouseDiseño de escaleras #37
House at Rua Alabarda / Affonso Risi
Diseño de escaleras #37
Rome Residence by Fung + Blatt Architects
Diseño de escaleras #37

haleyanne-kerryDiseño de escaleras #37

Diseño de escaleras #37

odes-to-a-houseDiseño de escaleras #37
La Maison Unique, Longchamp Store by Thomas Heatherwick
Tecnohaus
Diseño de escaleras #37
Casa Comunidad – Matías Aguado
Diseño de escaleras #37
Casa Comunidad – Matías Aguado
Diseño de escaleras #37
Edificio Argerich – Daniel Ventura
Diseño de escaleras #37
Edificio Argerich – Daniel Ventura
Diseño de escaleras #37
07CMM – Spaceworkers
Diseño de escaleras #37
Casa en Matsubara – Ken’ichi Otani Architects
Diseño de escaleras #37
Casa en Matsubara – Ken’ichi Otani Architects
Diseño de escaleras #37
Casa en Matsubara – Ken’ichi Otani Architects
Mas escaleras en:Diseño de Escaleras #36
En esta categoria especial:Escaleras



Lighthouse for the Dutchman / Urban Playground

Designed by Urban Playground, the ‘Lighthouse for the Dutchman’ project was proposed for the chapel at the entry of the Los Dutchman State Park in Phoenix, Arizona. Through a rearrangement of an embryological, mathematical reference known as “Shrek’s Surface”, spatial varieties are derived as a way to alter the combined experiences of both the spiritual and natural environment in the Arizona desert. The prototypical, curved surface is morphed and manipulated, creating contextual and functional relationships that are then translated into a series of parameters for the building’s morphology. More images and architects’ description after the break.

The beautiful and special landscape of south-central Arizona, presents an experience for visitors unlike any other place. Dry, hot summers with a brief rainy season during mid-summer and late-winter, offers a unique planting palette inconsistent with most deserts around the world. Towering Saguaros, groves of man-sized chollas and prickly-pear cactus, dot the landscape amidst a rocky terrain. Located at the base of the Superstition Mountains—whose name derives from an old tale of a lost prospector whose gold treasure, as well as himself, have never been found—offers spectacular views of the massive mountain and valley floor below. The remoteness of the landscape offers a secluded environment perfect for contemplation and self-reflection.

The double-layered chapel space is surrounded by a continuous hallway at the perimeter which expands inward at each corner. A concavity in the middle area of each side, accommodates separate programmatic functions. Based on the distance from the entrance, this constant passage offers varying degrees of privacy. We believe this is a way to create a cognitive programmatic separation without the use of physical barriers. Different from the universal spatial density of the hallway, the chapel space has a defined hierarchy over the altar. Looking toward the mountain peak, the altar clerestory contains a transparent window differing from the translucent channel glass used in the other volumes. Visitors then communicate with natural changes in the landscape through this window. The glazing above the chapel dome supported by a gridiron steel frame, has a series of operable roof hatches for natural ventilation and passive cooling. Wind passing in-between the raised clerestory volumes, increases wind velocity eliciting the Venturi effect.

Instead of a randomly defined edge on the exterior, the morphed structure is given a strict spatial limitation through the use of a simple boundary. In specifying the functional elements—walls for the chapel, raised clerestories, roof over the hallway, and so on—the structural homogeneity of the exterior boundary regulates the entire spatial variation. We wanted the structure to have a very clear orthogonal sense of both horizontality and verticality in its morphing operations, and experimented with how they coordinated the spatial complexity in strict and constant rules. As a result, the overall structure is acknowledged as an “inserted” entity into a box form, contrasting with typical and regional design custom.

This is clearly a counter experiment from the precedential orthodox and local practice found in Arizona. This proposal brings some objections against collective imagery regarding regional aspects. We see the most common building type here as being composed of a fragmented assemblage with an identically segmented materiality. We set forth an unfamiliar position, one that distances itself from the widespread architectural design methods such as mixing standardized products for custom detail developments, and the study of planar and/or sectional proportions for juxtaposed materials.

Architects: Urban Playground
Location: Phoenix, Arizona, United States
Team: Bhujon Kang, Andre Bighorse
Visualization Support: Christoph Kaiser
Project Year: 2012

Lighthouse for the Dutchman (1) Courtesy of Urban Playground
Lighthouse for the Dutchman (2) Courtesy of Urban Playground
Lighthouse for the Dutchman (3) Courtesy of Urban Playground
Lighthouse for the Dutchman (4) public area
Lighthouse for the Dutchman (5) pastor's desk
Lighthouse for the Dutchman (6) reflection
Lighthouse for the Dutchman (7) meeting hall
Lighthouse for the Dutchman (8) entry
Lighthouse for the Dutchman (9) model 01
Lighthouse for the Dutchman (10) model 02
Lighthouse for the Dutchman (11) model 03
Lighthouse for the Dutchman (12) model 04
Lighthouse for the Dutchman (13) model 05
Lighthouse for the Dutchman (14) model 06
Lighthouse for the Dutchman (15) model 07
Lighthouse for the Dutchman (16) model 08
Lighthouse for the Dutchman (17) model 09
Lighthouse for the Dutchman (18) model 10
Lighthouse for the Dutchman (19) model 11
Lighthouse for the Dutchman (20) model 12
Lighthouse for the Dutchman (21) model 13
Lighthouse for the Dutchman (22) site plan
Lighthouse for the Dutchman (23) plans and sections
Lighthouse for the Dutchman (24) diagram

Lighthouse for the Dutchman / Urban Playground originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 30 Sep 2012.

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La deconstrucción del Club Med gana la Bienal Europea del Paisaje

El proyecto de restauración del paraje de Tudela-Culip, al norte del cabo de Creus (Girona), ha ganado la Bienal Europea del Paisaje. En este increíble lugar, geológicamente (ver video)…


La Universidad Rône-Alpes gana el concurso Solar Decathlon 2012

‘Canopea’, el prototipo de vivienda solar de la Universidad Rhône Alpes ha sido la propuesta vencedora de la Solar Decathlon Europe 2012, un concurso de arquitectura…


Museo Astrup Fearnley, Renzo Piano en Oslo

Situado en el borde de un fiordo cruzando el agua de un canal, el museo inaugurado por Renzo Piano en el muelle Tjuvholmen de Oslo busca, junto a la Opera House construida por Snohetta en 2007, potenciar…


Bayside House / Grzywinski+Pons

Architects: Grzywinski+Pons
Location: Bayside, New York, United States
Design Team: Matthew Grzywinski, Amador Pons
Project Year: 2008
Project Area: 3,200 sq ft
Photographs: Floto + Warner/OTTO

This residence was built for a family in the Bayside neighborhood of Queens in New York City. The 3200 square foot triplex home houses three generations under the same roof so it is in essence a two family house. We disguised the bulk of this project, complied with zoning regulations and kept it lower than most of it’s mock tudor neighbors by locating much of the program below grade with a second yard excavated away from the street elevation. The retaining walls and glazing were configured to allow maximum daylight penetration and the two lower levels feature contiguous interior and exterior public space. Because the yard is small we minimized the amount of hardscape without abridging functionality.

Our client desired to live in a clean, bright, open and uncluttered environment. We didn’t see the inclusion of young children and grandparents and that intention as mutually exclusive so we created lots and lots of strategically placed and evenly distributed built in storage and specified finishes that were as durable and warm as they were toothsome.

Bayside House / Grzywinski+Pons © Floto + Warner/OTTO
Bayside House / Grzywinski+Pons © Floto + Warner/OTTO
Bayside House / Grzywinski+Pons © Floto + Warner/OTTO
Bayside House / Grzywinski+Pons © Floto + Warner/OTTO
Bayside House / Grzywinski+Pons © Floto + Warner/OTTO
Bayside House / Grzywinski+Pons © Floto + Warner/OTTO
Bayside House / Grzywinski+Pons © Floto + Warner/OTTO
Bayside House / Grzywinski+Pons © Floto + Warner/OTTO
Bayside House / Grzywinski+Pons © Floto + Warner/OTTO
Bayside House / Grzywinski+Pons © Floto + Warner/OTTO
Bayside House / Grzywinski+Pons © Floto + Warner/OTTO
Bayside House / Grzywinski+Pons © Floto + Warner/OTTO
Bayside House / Grzywinski+Pons Sketch 01
Bayside House / Grzywinski+Pons Sketch 02

Bayside House / Grzywinski+Pons originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 30 Sep 2012.

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Casa E4

eh_290912_01
Seguir leyendo…

The New Crew

Last year’s design/buildLAB crew has moved on to Fourth Year,and a new crew has stepped up to answer the call. This year, a team of 18 students will be working on two projects in Clifton Forge, VA- schematic design for the Shenandoah Autism Center, and Phase 2 of the Masonic Amphitheater site.

AIA Small Project Awards 2013 – Call for Entires

The Small Project Practitioners (SPP) Knowledge Community presents the ninth annual Small Project Award Program to recognize the work of small project practitioners and to promote excellence in small project design. This Award Program strives to raise public awareness of the value and design excellence that architects bring to all project types, including renovations and additions, no matter the limits of size and budget.

Award winning projects will be recognized in AIA publications and electronic media, including the SPP Journal and website. Projects will also be displayed at the 2013 AIA National Convention and Design Exposition. Select residential award winning projects will be included in Fine Homebuidling magazine’s annual awds issue, HOUSES, and on finehomebuilding.com.

Judging Criteria

Each entry will be judged for the success with which the project meets its individual program intent and requirements. Entries will be weighed individually, not in competition with each other. Criteria for judging will include the following:

The submission complies with all submission requirements
The project demonstrates exemplary skill in meeting program intent and requirements
The project achieves excellence in design

Award Categories

There are three built categories and one unbuilt category:

Category 1: A small project construction, object, work of environmental art or architectural design element up to $150,000.
Category 2: A small project construction, up to $1,500,000.
Category 3: A small project construction, object, work of environmental art, or architectural design under 5,000 SF constructed by the architect. The architect must have had a significant role in the construction, fabrication and/or installation of the work, in addition to being the designer.
Category 4: Unbuilt architectural designs under 5,000 SF for which there is no current intent to build, of all project types including purely theoretical, visionary projects, with or without a client.

Applicants may enter the same project in more than one category. The entry fee is on a per category basis (e.g. the same project entered in two categories will be charged two entry fees).

The Small Project Practitioners Knowledge Community encourages submissions of projects in all building types: commercial, retail, industrial, educational, public and private, as well as residential. In addition, projects may include fully completed new and renovations or elements of built projects. There is no limitation other than the quality of the final work. We invite the submission of projects accessible to people of all abilities. New construction and renovations are equally welcome.

Finally, the Small Project Practitioners Knowledge Community strongly encourages submissions from the many diverse Small Project Practitioner (SPP) members of the AIA and the profession.

Eligibility

Open to architects licensed in the United States.
Built projects completed after January 1, 2009.
Entry photography by the submitting architect is welcomed, but there is no restriction on professional photography.
Maximum of four entries per firm – (a single project may be entered in two different categories with applicable fees for each entry). Maximum of two unbuilt entries per firm.
No projects are permitted that have previously received a national AIA award.

Submissions

2013 Entries must be submitted before 4:59:59 p.m. Eastern Time on November 12, 2012.

The submission deadline date will be strictly observed; no exceptions will be made. No entry fee will be refunded for entries that are disqualified, late, or not completed. Payments and submissions will only be accepted online.

Notifications will be made to Award Recipients mid to late February 2013.

Please review the 2013 AIA Small Project Awards Walk Through and Concealed ID Forms before beginning your submission. When you are ready to submit, go to the Submission Website.

Fees

Built Projects (Categories 1, 2 and 3):

AIA members – $150 for each entry
Nonmembers – $300 for each entry

Unbuilt Designs (Category 4):

AIA members – $75 for each entry
Nonmembers – $150 for each entry

All entry fees are nonrefundable.

2013 Jury

Leonard Kady, AIA (Chair) – Leonard Kady Architecture + Design – New York, NY
Julie Beckman – KBAS – Philadelphia, PA
Christopher Herr, AIA – Studio H:T – Boulder, CO
Laura Kraft, AIA – Laura Kraft Architect – Seattle, WA
Rob Yagid – Fine Homebuilding magazine – Newtown, CT

Check out the recipients of the 2012 Small Project Awards here! 

AIA Small Project Awards 2013 – Call for Entires originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 30 Sep 2012.

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Here’s What You Missed This Week

It’s been an exciting week here at Architizer. We concluded a competition, helped launch a brand new Google app, and counted off the best saunas (and “hobbit-holes”) from around the world. All while bringing you the best in architecture and design. It’s likely that you missed something, so we’ve rounded up our top posts of the week for you. This week promises to be even bigger than last, so make sure to stay tuned.

Click for the best of the week, here.

Architizer Partners With Google For New “Field Trip” App

Google tapped us to be a content partner for a new app called Field Trip—and that free app is now available for download in the Android Play Store! Says Google: “Through great partners such as Architizer, Field Trip users can discover thousands of interesting places and experiences around them.” Read more.