Shop Talk : Rives Rash

As part of my research over the past year into the nature of craftsmanship in digital fabrication, I’ve done a handful of interviews with individuals engaging the topic in some manner. Ranging from craft researchers to fabricators, every conversation has yielded amazing insight not only into my own work, but also into how other fields are engaging the digital tools we have started to take for granted within certain circles of architecture. Rereading each text as began the format them for my research documentation, I began to feel it was wasteful to just bury them in the appendix and will be posting some of them here in the blog.

One such conversation occurred this past March with Rives Rash. I had met Rives a month earlier while assisting a friend with a workshop at the University of Kentucky College of Design where Rives teaches. Although that was the first time we talked, I had known of Rives by his reputation for a number of years as stories of a punk kid out in LA had made t…

Modelo 3d de la Ciudad de Nueva York

3D Model New York CitySeguir leyendo…

GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR

© Liam Frederick

Architects: SmithGroup JJR
Location: Phoenix, USA
Design Team: Eddie Garcia, Mark Kranz, Katheryn Terwelp, Carrie Perrone, Justin Trexler, Josh Vacca, Megan Smith
Photographs: Liam Frederick

Structural Engineer: Paragon Structural Design, Inc.
Civil Engineer: Dibble Engineering

Since 1968, GateWay Community College has built a legacy of innovation, pioneering vision and responsiveness to the needs of its community.  It was the first technical college in Arizona,  first to use community advisory committees,  first to tailor courses to the needs of business and industry, first to offer classes at off-campus locations, and even the first to install a computer. From a humble beginning in the former Korrick’s Department Store in downtown Phoenix, Maricopa Technical College has flourished over the past 40 years into today’s GateWay.

© Liam Frederick

GateWay Community College now offers more than 125 degree, certificate and workforce training options.  It’s no coincidence its motto is, “Learn more, live better”.

© Liam Frederick

Urban Revitalization

GateWay Community College is located at the geographic center of Phoenix’s  “Discovery Triangle,” a zone of focus for redevelopment that connects the city’s academic and research centers.  Historically a blighted and underutilized area of metro Phoenix, the Discovery Triangle has seen progress in recent years as a result of the city’s new light rail system. While the GateWay Community College campus is currently surrounded by a dog track, tire shops, low budget motels and abandoned lots, the project represents a scale of urban renewal not seen to date.

© Liam Frederick

Campus Transformation

The Integrated Education Building significantly transforms GateWay Community College, adding literally an entire set of program elements to the center of the campus. The three-story building creates an “academic city” that contributes to a sense of community on campus, and complements the campus’ assortment of architectural languages.  As an assemblage of warehouses that have been converted into academic functions and two new buildings constructed in the past 15 years, the IEB shifts the center of gravity of campus and re-focuses academic and student life functions. A palette of masonry, glass, galvanized metal and copper complements the campus and evolves the language looking towards the future.

© Liam Frederick

The stacking concept creates shaded terrace space on the south façade. This connects g the interior to a new campus mall, while the program cascades to the east to provide multi-level connections to the campus quad, while offering elevated outdoor study and faculty space at each floor. The Multi-Purpose Community Space is focused towards a primary light rail stop for visibility and access.

© Liam Frederick

Campus in a Box

A new urban mall is sculpted on the building’s southern edge. A series of outdoor spaces is created through desert landscaping, shade canopies and upper level balconies. The main lobby space is strategically sited  at the intersection of primary existing pedestrian flows.

Long Section

GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR © Liam Frederick
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR Plan 01 01
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR Plan 02 01
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR Plan 03 01
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR Site Plan 01
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR North Elevation 01
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR South Elevation 01
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR East Elevation 01
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR West Elevation 01
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR Long Section 01
GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR Cross Section 01

GateWay Community College / SmithGroup JJR originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 31 Aug 2012.

send to Twitter | Share on Facebook | What do you think about this?


Urban Exquis II: Open Call and Exhibit – sound and movie installation

Continue reading

Biennale Bulletin: Edible Estates by Fritz Haeg

Photo of Edible Estates #8: Lenape Edible Estate Manhattan via Fritz Haeg

This post is part of a series dedicated to the 13th Venice Architecture Biennale. In addition to on-the-ground reports, we’re featuring firms and projects showcased in the U.S. pavilion’s exhibition, Spontaneous Interventions.

Los Angeles-based artist Fritz Haeg is on a mission to replace unused domestic lawns with planted gardens, allowing families to grow their own food. The “Edible Estates” initiative began in 2005 with the planting of a garden in Salinas, Kansas, the geographic center of the United States. By replacing unoccupied front lawns with low-cost gardens, Edible Estates “invites us to reconsider our relationships with our neighbors, the sources of our food, and our connections to the natural environment immediately outside our front doors.” Read more.

Photo of Edible Estates #10: Rooftop Homestead Edible Estate Rome via Fritz Haeg

Photo of Edible Estates #10: Rooftop Homestead Edible Estate Rome after 5 months via Fritz Haeg

Since the creation of the initial site, Edible Estates has planted prototype gardens in cities across the United States and Europe. Always planted in the spring or early summer, the first season of growth is documented through a public exhibition, a series of videos and weekly garden portraits, and workshops on growing food, as well as printed brochures, calendars, and other gardening resources.

The “Spontaneous Interventions” exhibition includes a video installation by filmmaker Kelly Loudenberg, who asked exhibition participants to discuss their aspirations and concerns for the American city while pretending they were running for office or advising elected officials. Here, Fritz Haeg encourages people to get involved…

Fritz Haeg from Architizer on Vimeo.

Video credits: Kelly Loudenberg, producer/editor; Louie Metzner, assistant editor;  Alexandra Tell and Andreas Jonathan (production assistants)

“Working with the 99%” Wins a Future Cities Prize in Venice

Three winning projects were announced in the Future Cities, Planning for the 90 per cent competition: ateliermob (Portugal), Municipal Housing Secretariat of S

Lagravera / SALA FERUSIC Architects

Courtesy of SALA FERUSIC Architects

Architects: SALA FERUSIC Architects
Location: Alfarràs, Lleida, Spain
Design Team: Carles Sala, Relja Ferusic
Project Year: 2009
Photographs: Courtesy of SALA FERUSIC Architects

Project Area: 600.0 sqm
Client: Celler Lagravera SLU

La Gravera is a winery conceived under low cost criteria, where the optimization in energy and material means and resources become important. Economic sustainability usually comes together with environmental sustainability.

Courtesy of SALA FERUSIC Architects

A warehouse of the 58, belonging to an old gravel quarry industry, is recovered to reactivate and transform it into a winery, through the disposal of industrial elements.

Courtesy of SALA FERUSIC Architects

The construction elements must keep in scale economy and mass production, to minimize its impact on the environment and consequently to the economy, and they are organized under spatial, functional and higrothermal design criteria.

Courtesy of SALA FERUSIC Architects

The project is structured regarding to the following points: a four-meter-high closet that organizes the service spaces, the action centre where human activity is assisted by machines and the zona 900, a welcome lounge with a striped carpet and a bright ceiling, underneath which the cellar is located, and where the control unit monitorizes the vineyard in real-time, and the design and pedagogy of the wine takes place.

Courtesy of SALA FERUSIC Architects

In conclusion, this low cost criteria force us to claim: less (money) is more!

Section

Lagravera / SALA FERUSIC Architects Courtesy of SALA FERUSIC Architects
Lagravera / SALA FERUSIC Architects Courtesy of SALA FERUSIC Architects
Lagravera / SALA FERUSIC Architects Courtesy of SALA FERUSIC Architects
Lagravera / SALA FERUSIC Architects Courtesy of SALA FERUSIC Architects
Lagravera / SALA FERUSIC Architects Courtesy of SALA FERUSIC Architects
Lagravera / SALA FERUSIC Architects Courtesy of SALA FERUSIC Architects
Lagravera / SALA FERUSIC Architects Courtesy of SALA FERUSIC Architects
Lagravera / SALA FERUSIC Architects Courtesy of SALA FERUSIC Architects
Lagravera / SALA FERUSIC Architects Courtesy of SALA FERUSIC Architects
Lagravera / SALA FERUSIC Architects Courtesy of SALA FERUSIC Architects
Lagravera / SALA FERUSIC Architects Courtesy of SALA FERUSIC Architects
Lagravera / SALA FERUSIC Architects Courtesy of SALA FERUSIC Architects
Lagravera / SALA FERUSIC Architects Courtesy of SALA FERUSIC Architects
Lagravera / SALA FERUSIC Architects Courtesy of SALA FERUSIC Architects
Lagravera / SALA FERUSIC Architects Courtesy of SALA FERUSIC Architects
Lagravera / SALA FERUSIC Architects Courtesy of SALA FERUSIC Architects
Lagravera / SALA FERUSIC Architects Courtesy of SALA FERUSIC Architects
Lagravera / SALA FERUSIC Architects Courtesy of SALA FERUSIC Architects
Lagravera / SALA FERUSIC Architects Courtesy of SALA FERUSIC Architects
Lagravera / SALA FERUSIC Architects Courtesy of SALA FERUSIC Architects
Lagravera / SALA FERUSIC Architects Plan 01
Lagravera / SALA FERUSIC Architects Situation 01
Lagravera / SALA FERUSIC Architects Section 01
Lagravera / SALA FERUSIC Architects Section 02
Lagravera / SALA FERUSIC Architects Section 03
Lagravera / SALA FERUSIC Architects Detail 01
Lagravera / SALA FERUSIC Architects Diagram 01

Lagravera / SALA FERUSIC Architects originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 31 Aug 2012.

send to Twitter | Share on Facebook | What do you think about this?


Multimedia artist Doug Aitken describes his exploration of how creative people tell their stories

Opening on September 15, “The Source” is a six-screen installation housed in a circular pavilion built by architect David Adjaye on Liverpool’s Albert Dock, for which Aitken has filmed conversations with 15 creatives including musician Jack White, architect Jacques Herzog, contemporary artist Thomas Demand, actor Tilda Swinton, photographer William Eggleston and the artist Mike Kelley, who died soon after the interview.

Otto + David Rockwell

“I think the age of totally specific specialization as a designer is less interesting. I think what’s more interesting is to merge different interests and passions and invent something new.” – David Rockwell, Rockwell Group

Biennale Bulletin: 10 Pavilions of Note, From Least Visual To Most Over-The-Top

On the day after the public opening, the crowds died down a bit and I finally had the chance to see nearly every national pavilion. The following ten have come in first in something in these unofficial superlative rankings. Continue.

MOST NEGATIVE OUTLOOK (Also MOST CLEVER and MOST LIKELY TO SUCCEED): The Israeli Pavilion’s Aircraft Carrier

Have taken the overall theme of Common Ground quite literally, Israel used the exhibition to demonstrate who in common control the literal ground that Israel rests on.  They incorporated this theme without losing clarity of concept by selling tchotchkes with various references to Israeli politics, society, and economy. Judging by their sales so far, the shop will invariably make the Israeli pavilion most likely to succeed.

An arrow in the Isreali pavilion points toward the American pavilion.

MOST POSITIVE OUTLOOK: The US Pavilion’s Spontaneous Interventions

A timeline in the US Pavilion began with 7500 BCE Catal Huyuk and ended with 2012 Census reports declaring US cities growing faster than suburbs. Along the way it exhibited 124 projects that helped to improve US cities in recent years—small scale improvements by individuals instead of institutions. The interactive exhibition design for the banners, done by California based M-A-D design, made the content-heavy exhibition approachable.

The US Pavilion received an honorable mention for Best National Participation.

MOST MONUMENTAL: The Serbian Pavilion’s JEDAN:STO / 100

The Serbian word for “table” is much like the Serbian word for “one hundred”.  Thus the basis for the Serbian exhibition: a gigantic white table the size of 100 tables.  The length of the table allows it to act as a sounding board and visitors to the pavilion tapped with their palms to create sound vibrations in the room.

LEAST VISUAL PAVILION: The Polish Pavilion’s Making the walls quake as if they were dilating with the secret knowledge of great powers

Another space devAdd an Imageoid of objects but filled with a resonating sound: the ventilation shafts project the noises of the giardini into the aurally separated space of the pavilion.  The Polish pavilion was also the first honorable mention for Best National Participation.

BEST USE OF CARDBOARD: The Taiwanese Pavilion’s Architect/Geographer – Le Foyer de Taiwan

This pavilion looks as if it were carved by a CNC machine hanging from the ceiling into a series of cavernous rooms that form an apparently liveable home.

MOST COLORFUL: The Venezuelan Pavilion’s La ciudad socializante vs la ciudad alienante

The strong gestures and primary colors of Domenico Silvestro’s drawings in the exhibition are meant to generate interest from architects and lay people alike.

MOST FUN PAVILION: The Spanish Pavilion’s SpainLab

In addition to a meeting room located in a transparent plastic flower structure and a robotic garden, the Spanish Pavilion has a trampoline.

MOST COMFORTABLE: The Brazilian Pavilion’s Riposatevi and the Kuwaiti Pavilion’s Kethra

It really depends on your preferred resting style: peripheral cushions in the inaugural Kuwaiti pavilion or hammocks at the Brazilian pavilion.  In the case of Brazil, hanging around doesn’t mean you are lazy.  A quote by the Lúcio Costa, planner of: “The same people who rest in hammocks can, whenever necessary, build a new capital in three years’ time.”  In Kuwait’s pavilion you can contemplate something like the opposite: failed masterplans for Kuwait City are printed strewn across the wide floor.

MOST OVER-THE-TOP: The Russian Pavilion’s i-city

The lower level of the pavilion was unlit, its walls filled with peep-hole images of Russia’s 45 Cold War relic closed cities.  But upon entering the upper level you are given an ipad and gestured into a palace of QR codes.  The result is overwhelming.

TINIEST MODELS: The Japanese Pavilion’s Possible Here? Home-for-all

A focus on building back post-tsunami and not on starchitecture.  Many of these little models have a hand-made quality.  The Japanese pavilion was also the winner of the Golden Lion for best national participation.