Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau

© Luis Salazar

Architects: James & Mau
Location: Reus, Spain
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Luis Salazar

Project Area: 100.0 sqm
General Contractor And Manager: Infiniski

The house of 100m2 is designed in the shape of a cube organized on one level, including a central living area with an open kitchen, 2 rooms and a common bathroom.

© Luis Salazar

Located in the country side of the Tarragona Province, the project was thought of as a weekend house, which needed to be easy to use, efficient and which would take full advantage of its natural surroundings. The house was designed as a “living Box” which can be “opened”, “closed”, “switched on” “heated”, “cooled down” efficiently, easily and rapidly. The house is designed as a cube ? rational and functional ? where the transition between exterior and interior areas is as fluid as possible.

© Luis Salazar

The façade system uses Corten Steel panels which create an eye?catching contrast with its natural surroundings. The shutters play an important role both for the aesthetic value of the house and its energetic efficiency. The Shutters, which are completely integrated within the façade, use perforated panels of Corten Steel. The panels are perforated with the shape of Mint leaves which project luminous forms in the interior during day and in the exterior at night, a little like a “light box”. Those perforated shutters, when closed also work as a solar protector allowing air and light to pass through.

© Luis Salazar

The project relies on a bioclimatic architecture adapting the form and positioning of the house to its energetic needs: natural ventilation, passive solar design, intelligent façade system, natural shades ect.

© Luis Salazar

Instead of using shipping containers, Infiniski decided to use 4 prefabricated (inhouse) metal modules. The house uses 3 modules (ISO transport) which serve as structure. The walls are composed of an eco?friendly insulation layer made of sheep wool, and cellulose panels. With the joint action of its bioclimatic design, the use of eco?friendly building materials, the use of renewable energies ( in this case Biomass heating and solar panels) the house gains very high thermal efficiency and was recognized with the highest level of energetic efficiency (Certification A) by the Regional Institute of Energy ICAEN. This allows a reduction up to 60% of energetic consumption.

© Luis Salazar

The house cost 100.000 Euros and was built in 3 months.

Plan

Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau © Luis Salazar
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau Plan 01
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau Plan 02
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau Elevation 01
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau Elevation 02
Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau Section 01

Infiniski Menta House / James & Mau originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 31 Jul 2012.

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Cherokee Lofts by Gwynne Pugh Urban Studio

The 32,000 sq. ft. building is the first LEED Platinum (pending) Certified building in Hollywood and is the first LEED Platinum Certified mixed-use or market rate multi-family building in Southern California. The building distinguishes itself from most conventionally developed projects in that it incorporates energy efficient measures that exceed standard practice, optimize building performance, and ensure reduced energy use during all phases of construction and occupancy. The project received a 2011 AIA/COTE Top Ten Green Proj

A Peek Inside The Canadian Pavilion At The 2012 Venice Biennale

‘Migrating Landscapes.’ Image: Ryan Archer.

The thirteenth annual International Architecture Biennale will kick off at the end of August, with pavilions from 55 participating nations. This year’s theme, set by curator David Chipperfield, is ‘Common Ground,’ and Canada’s national pavilion will compliment it greatly.

Winniped-based 5468796 Architecture in conjunction with University of Manitoba professor Jae Sung Chon have formed Migrating Landscapes Organizer (MLO), the curating agency for the pavilion, which will feature 18 works from architects and students under 45. The theme, ‘Migrating Landscapes,’ will examine issues surrounding globalization and immigration, specifically in the context of architecture. It seeks to answer the question: how does design cross cultural, social, and political borders?

Image: Grajewski Fotograph

To investigate this new world of mobile people and ideas, MLO first created a conceptual grid from rectangular extrusions of various types of wood. In the words of MLO, “the landscape is envisioned as a grid mosaic – an abstraction of the physical [configuration], social [relationship], economic [size] and political [hierarchy] conditions that form Canada’s pluralistic cultural identity.” The projects, winners of a 2011 national competition, are then placed within this landscape, nestling into it but not being overwhelmed by the larger composition.

Image: Jacqueline Young

‘In Between the Countryside and the City’ by Jean-Nicholas Bouchard and Philippe Charest. Image: Grajewski Fotograph.

‘Meta’ by Jason Hare. Image: Grajewski Fotograph.

Migrating Landscapes Organizer (MLO)

[Images via designboom]

Casa L – Christian Pottgiesser


Casa L - Christian Pottgiesser

La casa L, surge a partir de un antiguo invernadero del siglo 18 que formó parte en sus orígenes de un castillo en Yvelines, Francia. La estructura original de características patrimoniales, quería ser integrada a una vivienda preexistente que albergaba a una familia con cuatro hijos y cuyo espacio se había hecho muy reducido para sus integrantes. Por éstos motivos se le encarga el desarrollo del proyecto al arquitecto francés Christian Pottgiesser.

Casa L - Christian Pottgiesser

Casa L - Christian Pottgiesser

Resultado de un continuo debate entre el arquitecto y el cliente, el programa tomó forma considerando las importantes limitaciones de su localización. Tres perímetros rodeados de monumentos históricos, la obligación de mantener cubiertas de dos aguas, la conservación de una red de aguas residuales que divide el jardín y el deseo de los integrantes de la familia por tener cada uno su espacio personal.

Casa L - Christian Pottgiesser

Casa L - Christian Pottgiesser

Mientras que el invernadero no es una parte obvia del proyecto y se fusiona con la nueva operación, la adición a la casa original se conecta con el viejo edificio por el lado este.

Casa L - Christian Pottgiesser

Construido en una ladera, el edificio de roca contiene los espacios comunes de la familia y los mantiene arraigados al nivel de suelo. Desde ahí, cinco torres de hormigón blancas con detalles en madera de pino, sobresalen visualmente desde el sólido pabellón. El techo de la base es accesible desde la ladera y esta cubierto con vegetación perenne, cañas de bambú clavadas en el suelo conforman un borde natural a modo de barandillas para los patios entre torres.

Casa L - Christian Pottgiesser

Cada miembro de la familia tiene su propia torre con un área de acceso y un dormitorio. La torre de los padres, la de mayor tamaño entre las cinco, también tiene un patio en la cubierta y desde él se obtiene una vista privilegiada del desarrollo total del proyecto.

Casa L - Christian Pottgiesser

Las áreas comunes aparte de conectar todas las torres del conjunto, otorgan un grato ambiente interior, naturalmente iluminado por la luz del día que atraviesa por las lucarnas que perforan el techo. Construido en hormigón y albañilería el bloque aporta masa térmica, lo que permite a las torres retener calor en invierno y estar frescas durante el verano.

Casa L - Christian Pottgiesser

Arquitecto: Christian Pottgiesser
Ubicación: Yvelines, Francia
Superficie de la obra: 870m2
Año: 2004- 2010
Fotografías: George Dupin, Pascale Thomas & CPAP

Casa L - Christian Pottgiesser

Casa L - Christian Pottgiesser

Casa L - Christian Pottgiesser



A Stool Made of Oceanic Debris, Manufactured at Sea

All photos: Studio Swine

Plastic is forever, more or less. Recent studies estimate that an average of 46,000 pieces of plastic can be found per square kilometer of the world’s oceans, while the UN reports that the number of plastic pieces in the Pacific Ocean has tripled in the last ten years. Even more alarming is the nearly incomprehensible 100 million tons of plastic waste deposited worldwide, with that figure expected to double in the next ten years alone. Where to go out of this bleak?

Studio Swine and Kieren Jones‘ “Sea Chair” seeks a way to collect this stray plastic and harvest it for constructive ends. Launched this past spring at the Milan Furniture Fair, the chair is made entirely of debris collected and processed through a series of custom devices.

Inspired by early mining equipment, the designed developed a curious contraption–made of salvaged machinery and dubbed ‘The Nurdler’ after the industrial plastic pellets it collects–whose chief function sorts large quantities of debris from the water as simply and efficiently as possible. The Nurdler consists of a hand powered water pump and a sluice that sifts the micro plastic pellets, plus a flotation tank that ensures the recycling of those elusive plastic pellets, separating the debris by density.

The “Sea Chair” was fabricated with bits of plastic collected from Porthowan Beach, one of the UK’s most polluted beaches. The fodder was then fed into the “Sea Press”, a furnace and hydraulic press combo that compresses the debris–plastic intermixed with seawood, wood, and shells–into disks and molds. The press is compact enough to fit on a sea frigate, and so, according to the designers, “enable[s] production at sea”. Once the stools have been cast, they are tagged with a production number and coordinates according to the geographic location of its sandy contents.

[via StudioSwine]

In Progress: E’ Tower / Wiel Arets Architects

© Jan Bitter

Architects: Wiel Arets Architects
Location: Mathildelaan, Eindhoven, The Netherlands
Project Team: Wiel Arets, Freyke Hartemink, Dennis Villanueva, Daniel Meyer
Photographs: Jan Bitter

Project Area: 16,000 sqm
Consultants: Nelissen BV, Tielemans BV, LBP/Brandveiligheid Erik Janse, SchreuderGroep BV, Scheldebouw BV, DHV BV
Client: Stadionkwartier BV, Laurentius-Amvest

The project is located in the Stadium Quarter, an area next to the Phillips Stadium in Eindhoven. It is an integral part of the Stripe S urban plan drawn up by landscape firm West 8.

© Jan Bitter

The original brief for the area includes the E’ Tower, Block E and a slender end piece of the adjacent Block J – all apartment buildings in this emerging district. A gap between the E’ Tower and Block J will give form to the area’s entrance while also providing an outdoor space adjacent to the tower for use by its inhabitants.

© Jan Bitter

With a program of simple apartments, the project deals mainly with the horizontal stacking of slabs from which projects a series of specifically shaped brises-soleil, creating a constant play of shadow on the façade, itself composed of a semi-structural glazing of sliding panels. Some apartments have an internal conservatory, serving as a bal- cony during summer, and an extra room during cooler months. All other apartments have their own private balcony.

© Jan Bitter

In Progress: E' Tower / Wiel Arets Architects © Jan Bitter
In Progress: E' Tower / Wiel Arets Architects © Jan Bitter
In Progress: E' Tower / Wiel Arets Architects © Jan Bitter
In Progress: E' Tower / Wiel Arets Architects © Jan Bitter
In Progress: E' Tower / Wiel Arets Architects © Jan Bitter
In Progress: E' Tower / Wiel Arets Architects © Jan Bitter
In Progress: E' Tower / Wiel Arets Architects © Jan Bitter
In Progress: E' Tower / Wiel Arets Architects © Jan Bitter
In Progress: E' Tower / Wiel Arets Architects © Jan Bitter
In Progress: E' Tower / Wiel Arets Architects © Jan Bitter
In Progress: E' Tower / Wiel Arets Architects © Jan Bitter
In Progress: E' Tower / Wiel Arets Architects © Jan Bitter

In Progress: E' Tower / Wiel Arets Architects originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 31 Jul 2012.

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Rainbow Massimal by Design Office Takebayashi Scroggin

Lexington, KY-based Design Office Takebayashi Scroggin (D.O.T.S.) has sent us images of its installation “Rainbow Massimal”, one of the attractions at Lexington’s 2012 Beaux Arts Ball and winner of a 2011-12 A’ Design Award.

The Umbrellas of Águenda

Photos: Patrícia Almeida

Photographs of a delightful public art installation in Portugal have recently surfaced. A flock of brightly colored umbrellas float over a shopping street in Águenda, a small Portuguese town along the country’s northwest coastline known for, well, not very much it seems. Almost as little is know about the installation, save for these photographs and brief commentary from flickr user Patrícia Almeida. Regardless of its provenance, the work is lively enough to inspire interludes of song and dance (or pantomime) that color the iconic 1964 film “The Umbrellas of Cherbourg”. Here, the cheerful formation of parasols is  is suspended in mid-air, bathing the promenade in their colorful glow, while casting an array of octagonal shadows to shade pedestrians from the hot summer sun.

[via feeldesain]

Aqualina Residencia, Tailandia

Residencia Aqualina es una residencia contemporánea de vacaciones en Koh Samui, Tailandia. El diseño de vanguardia y de aspecto contemporáneo sin duda hacen que se destaque y asegura que una vez vista, nunca te olvidaras. La villa se sentó en un lugar de montaña muy pintoresco y tranquilo con vistas a la vecina isla de Koh Phangan, y cercana la carretera principal que está a sólo unos cientos de metros haciendo de este un lugar muy conveniente para todo lo que Samui tiene para ofrecer . El giro a la Aqualina se coloca entre las áreas de Koh Samui y Maenam y por lo tanto no es una fuente infinita de restaurantes y bares a poca distancia. La piscina está rodeada por una terraza de piedra blanca que es perfecto para tomar el sol y más allá de eso, un césped bien cuidado plantados con hermosos árboles Frangipani y locales de plantas tropicales se envuelve alrededor de la villa. Aqualina tiene un total de tres dormitorios, mostrando un diseño elegante y minimalista. Las características sostenibles de la residencia incluyen una cubierta de pastos las estructuras del techo con las propiedades de refrigeración, además de una preservación del agua bien adaptado y un sistema de colección.

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AIA selects the 2012 Recipients of the Small Project Awards

SPECS Optical Façade, Minneapolis / Alchemy Architects © Geoffrey Warner and Scott Ervin

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has announced the eleven recipients of the 2012 Small Project Awards. Now in its ninth year, the AIA Small Project Awards Program emphasizes the excellence of small-project design and strives to raise public awareness of the value and design excellence that architects bring to projects, no matter the limits of size and scope.

The award recipients are categorized into three groups; category 1) a small project construction, object, work of environmental art or architectural design element up to $150,000 2) a small project construction, up to $1,500,000 and 3) a small project construction up to $1,500,000 which does not rely on external infrastructure as its primary power source.

The 2012 Small Project Award winners are:

Category 1

SPECS Optical Façade, Minneapolis / Alchemy Architects

To bring visibility to an optical shop hindered by sign codes and obscured by landscape beautification on one of Minneapolis’ busiest streets, Alchemy evaluated code options and technology to create architecture inseparable from the idea of sign. On a limited design+build budget, a new skin of self-supporting greenhouse polycarbonate frames grow out of the historic facade. Low and high tech tools included a laser cut scale install model, CNC cut polycarbonate, waterjet-cut aluminum, and die-cut polyurethane straps which helped to celebrate craft befitting both the building and the creative store that inhabits it.

The Mobile Dwelling Cube; Oakland, CA /SPACEFLAVOR

The Mobile Dwelling Cube; Oakland, CA /SPACEFLAVOR – Courtesy of AIA

This compact mobile dwelling cube allows the client to balance his personal and professional life in one space. The mobile unit enables the client to freely reconfigure the loft to suit his Feng Shui classes while securing his personal realm. To meet the owner’s requests for transferring the cube to future locations and minimizing on-site fabrication, a steel frame and plywood components were prefabricated to fit through a standard 3-foot door. FSC Ash plywood panels were hand-selected for unique grain patterns that resemble Chinese ink landscapes. Soy-glued plywood finished with natural Shellac, enables the owner to inhabit the cube without off-gassing concerns.

Category 2

OS House; Racine, WI /Johnsen Schmaling Architects

OS House; Racine, WI /Johnsen Schmaling Architects © John J. Macaulay

Occupying a narrow infill lot in an old city neighborhood at the edge of Lake Michigan, this LEED Platinum home for a young family demonstrates how a small residence built with a moderate budget can become a confident, new urban constituent. The compact building volume is wrapped with an innovative concrete rain screen facade system that transforms into a delicate scrim of metal rods defining the perimeter of upper level outdoor rooms. Floor-to ceiling apertures penetrate the rain screen, their bright colors an unapologetic nod to the cheerful polychrome of the neighborhood’s Victorian homes.

Saint Nicholas Antiochian Orthodox Christian Church; Springdale, AR / Marlon Blackwell Architect

Saint Nicholas Antiochian Orthodox Christian Church; Springdale, AR / Marlon Blackwell Architect © Timothy Hursley

This project is the result of a transformation of an existing metal shop building into a sanctuary and fellowship hall on a 3-acre site in Springdale, Arkansas. The simple original structure is enveloped by a new skin, using classical proportions to provide a new transformative figure over the original gabled form. Although a small structure, its bold form makes it visible and recognizable from the interstate which passes nearby. The interior expresses the origins of the Orthodox Christian faith and traditions with a spatial reformation in the narthex, campanile, and sanctuary.

The Ghost Houses; Knoxville, TN / curb

The Ghost Houses; Knoxville, TN / curb © Robert Batey Photography

This project was not supposed to be possible – five units of housing and a studio in three structures on a one-quarter acre infill lot with an historic zoning overlay. Yet, by using the history of the site as a wedge the architects were able to overcome rigid regulations to create a progressive project consistent with their interest in dense, walkable, mixed-use neighborhoods and architecture that is simultaneously responsive to both its location and global environmental concerns.

Becherer House; Charlottesville, VA /Robert M. Gurney, FAIA

Becherer House; Charlottesville, VA /Robert M. Gurney, FAIA © Maxwell MacKenzie Architectural

The house is conceived of three gable-roofed pavilions that provide a threshold between the woodlands and the pastures, taking advantage of two very different scenic panoramas. The one room deep, central living pavilion contains large expanses of glass along two walls, affording views of both the woods and rolling horse pastures. This configuration insures the space will be flooded with light at all times of the day throughout the year. A screened porch and bluestone terrace, running the length of the house provides a stage to view sunsets over the pastures while a manicured lawn and dry-stacked slate wall provide an ordered transition from the house to the woods beyond.

L Residence; Omaha, NE / Min | Day

L Residence; Omaha, NE / Min | Day © Paul Crosby Architectural Photography

This filmmaker’s apartment reinterprets the use of poché to support Baroque theatricality and proposes a cinematic architecture of sequence and frame. The use of “virtual poché” in the Baroque to hide service spaces is updated through an emphasis on thinness and surface instead of solidity and mass. The apartment occupies the top floor of a converted Art Deco hotel. We conceived the living space as a pseudo-exterior, pushing private and utilitarian spaces behind a wall of cnc-cut Oak veneer. A private roof deck above is accessed from stairs in the compressed space of the poché.

Stacked Cabin; Muscoda, WI / Johnsen Schmaling Architects

Stacked Cabin; Muscoda, WI / Johnsen Schmaling Architects © John J. Macaulay

This modest cabin has a compact volume built into a densely wooded slope at the edge of a clearing. Minimizing the building’s footprint and taking advantage of the sloped site, the horizontally organized components of a traditional cabin compound – typically an open-plan longhouse with communal living space, an outhouse, and a freestanding tool shed – were reconfigured and stacked vertically. The bottom level serves as the infrastructural base for the living quarters above. Stairs lead up to the open living hall centered around a stove and bracketed by a galley kitchen and small sleeping rooms.

Yao_Residence; Chicago / Perimeter Architects

Yao_Residence; Chicago / Perimeter Architects © Ana Miyares Photography

This existing wood frame single family residence is thirty feet from a Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) train platform, making a focus on sound, view, and natural light paramount. The new standing seam metal panel west wall is filled with an open-cell spray foam insulation, dramatically buffering sound from the train. Window fenestration has been reduced to a single 6’x6’ deep set window. Skylights in the existing roof profile provide natural light and ventilation. A ‘slice’ in the existing roof gives lateral stability to a structurally weak existing wood frame and hides mechanical rooftop equipment from sight. A fully integrated scupper system was designed on the west roof pitch to produce a seamless wall to roof reading of the metal panel siding.

Category 3

Shade Platform; Phoenix / SmithGroupJJR

Shade Platform; Phoenix / SmithGroupJJR © Liam Frederick

The design of the Maricopa County Security Center Building Shade Platform employs a creative combination of modular and prefabricated steel framed building systems. Steel planks span an elevated frame to define the platform, and shading devices were created using standard aluminum tubes of varied colors. Arranged vertically and horizontally around the platform’s south and west edges, the combination of hues brings depth to the enclosing surfaces. Glass rails complete the north and east perimeters, offering views of downtown Phoenix. The design creates a contemporary counterpoint to the building’s Renaissance Revivalist style.

Cape Russell Retreat; Sharps Chapel, TN / Sanders Pace Architecture

Cape Russell Retreat; Sharps Chapel, TN / Sanders Pace Architecture © Jeffrey Jacobs Photography

This off-the-grid lakeside pavilion located in rural East Tennessee begins with a lightweight steel frame shop fitted with tabs to allow for the attachment of framing members. A secondary skin of 2