Scuola di ballo, Escuela Nacional de Arte to be converted?

Norman Foster told the Sunday Times: “Carlos is a great dancer who is inspiring the regeneration of an iconic ruin of early modernism outside Havana.”

Speaking to The Sunday Times on June 17th, Cuban ballet dancer Carlos Acosta and Lord Norman Foster explained their plans to regenerate the iconic ruin of early modernism outside Havana. The original building, with its distinctive brick and domed roof construction was designed in 1961 by Italian Vittorio Garatti. Someone has already started a Facebook page Comitato “Vittorio Garatti” looking to prevent the plan. They write “This is really important! We can’t permit to another architect to put his hands on the National Schools of Arts…The original architect is Vittorio Garatti and he is alive and well, he should be the one at the helm of any design or development at this site.

Assembly One Pavilion / Yale School of Architecture Students

Courtesy of the Yale School of Architecture

The Yale ‘Assembly One’ pavilion is the younger, smaller, more carefree sister to Yale’s building project – a 40-year old tradition in which first-year students design and building a house. It is the product of a seminar and design studio in which students focused on alternative ways in which contemporary buildings can come together and the potential architectural effects computational and material techniques can offer. The ‘Assembly One’ pavilion is designed to act as an information center for New Haven’s summer International Festival of Arts and Ideas and therefore was developed with the following characteristics in mind: dynamism, visual transparency and visual density.

Continue after the break for more!

Courtesy of the Yale School of Architecture

Dynamism: The structure is suited to a performance festival – solid and massive from one angle, lightweight and almost entirely porous from another, it alternately hides and reveals its contents.

Visual Transparency: Constructed from thin aluminum sheets, the pavilion opens up on two sides for ventilation and security, focusing views toward the festival’s main stage.

Visual Density: Over 1000 panels create shifting effects of reflection and color as visitors move around the pavilion, creating less of a timeless image of shelter than an unstable, engaging heart of the festival.

“We treated the tenets of digital fabrication as basic assumptions – our ability to efficiently produce variable and unique components and the cultural implications of moving beyond standardized manufacturing. But, we were less concerned with the uniqueness of the objects we created than on the novel types of tectonic expression they allowed.”

Courtesy of the Yale School of Architecture

The Festival Pavilion was designed and built by Yale School of Architecture students.
Project Founders: David Bench, Zac Heaps, Jacqueline Ho, Eric Zahn
Project Managers: Jacqueline Ho, Amy Mielke
Design & Fabrication: John Taylor Bachman, Nicholas Hunt, Seema Kairam, John Lacy, Veer Nanavatty
Design: Rob Bundy, Raven Hardison, Matt Hettler
Faculty advisor: Brennan Buck
Assistant: Teoman Ayas
Consultant: Matthew Clark of Arup, New York

Generous support was provided by Assa Abloy, the Yale Graduate and Professional Student Senate, and the Yale School of Architecture. The Pavilion is on view on the New Haven Green until the end of June.

Courtesy of the Yale School of Architecture

Assembly One Pavilion / Yale School of Architecture Students (1) Courtesy of the Yale School of Architecture
Assembly One Pavilion / Yale School of Architecture Students (2) Courtesy of the Yale School of Architecture
Assembly One Pavilion / Yale School of Architecture Students (3) Courtesy of the Yale School of Architecture
Assembly One Pavilion / Yale School of Architecture Students (4) Courtesy of the Yale School of Architecture
Assembly One Pavilion / Yale School of Architecture Students (5) Courtesy of the Yale School of Architecture
Assembly One Pavilion / Yale School of Architecture Students (6) Courtesy of the Yale School of Architecture
Assembly One Pavilion / Yale School of Architecture Students (7) Courtesy of the Yale School of Architecture
Assembly One Pavilion / Yale School of Architecture Students (8) Courtesy of the Yale School of Architecture

Salon Urbain / Sid Lee Architecture + Ædifica

Architect: Sid Lee Architecture + Ædifica
Location: Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Project Area: 5,950 sqf
Project Year: 2012
Photographs: Stéphane Brugger

© Stéphane Brugger

Sid Lee Architecture and Ædifica turned the parking area at Place des Arts into a Salon Urbain, a versatile new space ideal for meeting up before or after a musical performance, a gallery visit or a conference. The Salon Urbain fully captures the artistic appeal of the site, located at the St. Urbain entrance of the Place des Arts and next to the new concert hall.

© Stéphane Brugger

“The Salon Urbain boasts a conveniently central location, but it really comes to life during events,” explains Martin Leblanc, architect and partner at Sid Lee Architecture. “The space is a destination in itself and a welcoming prelude to the musical and social experience it precedes.”

© Stéphane Brugger

The bar is the pièce de resistance of the Salon Urbain, a hymn to art: a sound wave in physical form. It is the key element in a mobile world where people come together, dance, listen… The colour red is omnipresent, associated with performing arts and premiere nights, and becomes the symbol of a hip urban culture that beats to rhythm of music and the arts. The Salon Urbain is a versatile space, equipped with the latest technology and perfect for any event. The goal of the Salon Urbain is to keep alive the magical feeling that comes with attending a concert.

© Stéphane Brugger

The Salon Urbain is must?see destination that will attract a clientele all its own and that can used both day and night. All senses will be awakened in this space, the ideal backdrop for a variety of special events. Any time of day, pre? and postperformance, timeless.

plan

Salon Urbain / Sid Lee Architecture + Aedifica (7) © Stéphane Brugger
Salon Urbain / Sid Lee Architecture + Aedifica (1) © Stéphane Brugger
Salon Urbain / Sid Lee Architecture + Aedifica (2) © Stéphane Brugger
Salon Urbain / Sid Lee Architecture + Aedifica (3) © Stéphane Brugger
Salon Urbain / Sid Lee Architecture + Aedifica (4) © Stéphane Brugger
Salon Urbain / Sid Lee Architecture + Aedifica (5) © Stéphane Brugger
Salon Urbain / Sid Lee Architecture + Aedifica (6) © Stéphane Brugger
Salon Urbain / Sid Lee Architecture + Aedifica (8) © Stéphane Brugger
Plan plan

O (Omicron) Installation Directed by Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié

Courtesy of Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié

Directed by Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié, Omicron installation, the piece proposed for the Centennial Hall of Wroclaw, is based around the notion of timelessness in , and the idea of what future has meant throughout the 20th century. Taking the 1910’s as a starting point (the dome was erected in 1913), historical and artistic references were used to reveal the of the space, its timeless and, more surprisingly, very modern dimension. More images and their description after the break.

Courtesy of Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié

When opened, Hala Stulecia was the largest reinforced concrete structure in the world. With a diameter of 65m it was home to the largest dome built since the Pantheon in Rome eighteen centuries earlier. The Centennial Hall was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2006. It is reasonable to think that when Hala Stulecia was built in 1913 Max Berg’s ambition for his construction was to pass the test of time. What could have been his vision of the monument in the distant future? How did he imagine the olding of the materials? The evolution of the surrounding urbanism and populations?

Courtesy of Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié

A deliberately minimalist visual aesthetic allowed to highlight the very architecture of Hala Stulecia’s dome and re-affirm its place at the core of the piece. Minimalism also appeared to be the most appropriate means of conveying this idea of future at different periods of time (from 20’s/30’s anticipation film to more contemporary productions ). But the use of these references was not simply formal: the vision of futuristic totalitarian societies seemed to echo back real moments in the history of the building, warning us against the dangers of an idealized vision of the future.

Courtesy of Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié

Inspiration for the music composed especially for this project was found in both orchestral work, echoing the colossal size of the architecture, and electronic textures, evoking the action of time. The score also tried and recreate a sense of evolution of the materials used for the dome structure, and their sonic aging.

Courtesy of Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié

By using references such as Fritz Lang’s Metropolis or the projects of Archigram to confront the different visions of the future at different times, Romain Tardy and Thomas Vaquie were interested in trying to create a vision of a future with no precise time reference. A timeless future.

Directors: Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié
Location: Wroclaw,
Architecture: Max Berg
Visual Design: Romain Tardy, Guillaume Cottet
Music: Thomas Vaquié
2D/3D Mapping: Joanie Lemercier, Romain Tardy
Management & Production: Nicolas Boritch
Filmed By: Jerome Monnot, Joanie Lemercier, Romain Tardy
Edited By: Jerome Monnot

Click here to view the embedded video.

Click here to view the embedded video.

O (Omicron) Installation Directed by Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié (1) Courtesy of Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié
O (Omicron) Installation Directed by Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié (2) Courtesy of Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié
O (Omicron) Installation Directed by Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié (3) Courtesy of Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié
O (Omicron) Installation Directed by Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié (4) Courtesy of Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié
O (Omicron) Installation Directed by Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié (5) Courtesy of Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié
O (Omicron) Installation Directed by Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié (6) Courtesy of Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié
O (Omicron) Installation Directed by Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié (7) Courtesy of Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié
O (Omicron) Installation Directed by Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié (8) Courtesy of Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié
O (Omicron) Installation Directed by Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié (11) Courtesy of Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié
O (Omicron) Installation Directed by Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié (9) template
O (Omicron) Installation Directed by Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié (10) model
O (Omicron) Installation Directed by Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié (12) Courtesy of Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié
O (Omicron) Installation Directed by Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié (16) Courtesy of Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié
O (Omicron) Installation Directed by Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié (13) process 01
O (Omicron) Installation Directed by Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié (14) process 02
O (Omicron) Installation Directed by Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié (15) process 03

Heat wave

The past week in Norris has been sizzling hot, along with many areas of the country that have been experiencing excessive heat and drought-like conditions. We’ve had heat advisories almost every day for the past four days; temperatures have been in the low 100s, and humidity has hovered around 30% during the hottest time of the day. According to Norris Dam TVA rain gauge data, June has received only 1.9” of rain; typical rainfall is around 4” to 5” in June.  (Click here for UT’s Climate Data resource page where you can explore links to weather information.)

hot temperatures and hot peppers from the garden

The heat and lack of rain have had an impact on some of the trees and shrubs that were planted last fall. The dogwood and witch hazel trees, along with the hydrangeas, are exhibiting signs of distress—signs that I didn’t pick up on, but can now see (thank you to Valerie for pointing them out). They’re getting extra water until temperatures reach normal levels again.


witch h…

New Studenternas IP Development / Karlsson Wachenfeldt Arkitekter

Courtesy of Karlsson Wachenfeldt Arkitekter

As part of the the expansion of the university town of Uppsala, just north of Stockholm, the project by Karlsson Wachenfeldt Arkitekter for the Studenternas IP is a sports field with long traditions situated by the river Fyrisån. Located in the center of the town within the park, the design project is part of a major re-development of the south river area that includes housing, parks, sport facilities and infrastructure. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Courtesy of Karlsson Wachenfeldt Arkitekter

The location of the site is highly sensitive from a historical point of view, the scale and integrity of the surrounding park and river area must be preserved, also when introducing a large scale development. To the west the main Hospital of the region located, a large scale complex.

site plan

The project is a vision of a new kind of sports arena: a double-layered structure with a football/bandy stadium in the center and a commercial mixed-use block surrounding it. The structure generates possibilities for a non-dependent usage of the surrounding buildings, it offers a way of dealing with the different scales of the surrounding city and it creates exciting possibilities for synergies in the meeting of the two building structures.

plan 01

Landscape and scale:

The structure of the building becomes part of a larger park area next to Fyrisån. As the stadium itself has fixed proportions, we use the surrounding buildings to reduce or boost the scale depending of the surrounding scale. The building rises from the park and creates open courtyards which acts as entries to the arena. South of the arena, the landscape continues with integrated outdoor sport areas, meeting points, public plazas and bicycle/promenade roads.

plan 02

The stadium:

The Football stadium holds 15 000 spectators and are meant to work both during summer as a football stadium with grass and during the winter as an ice-covered bandy stadium. The stadium holds a basic program with changing rooms, entries, ticket facilities, spectator stands, kiosks etc. The arena is cladded with a semitransperent metal shell which gives a glimpse of the content of the arena.

sections

Surrounding structure

The program of the surrounding structure is flexible: it includes areas for a school, hotels, offices, housing, training facilities and conference centers. In the meeting between the stadium and the surrounding buildings the hospitality zones for the arena is located, suitable for use on a daily basis. This is also a way to make sure the buildings are provided with sufficient lighting with light from both directions. By lifting parts of the buildings from the ground we’re creating a closer relationship between the park and the building.

Architect: Karlsson Wachenfeldt Arkitekter
Location: Uppsala, Sweden
Architectural Design Team: Mattias Karlsson, Maria Lundahl, Therese Wallström, Johan Rickardt
Owner: Municipality of Uppsala
Gross Area: Approx. 30,000m2
Status: Proposal

New Studenternas IP Development (1) Courtesy of Karlsson Wachenfeldt Arkitekter
New Studenternas IP Development (2) Courtesy of Karlsson Wachenfeldt Arkitekter
New Studenternas IP Development (3) site plan
New Studenternas IP Development (4) plan 01
New Studenternas IP Development (5) plan 02
New Studenternas IP Development (6) sections
New Studenternas IP Development (7) diagram

Sleek Wooden Bathroom Collection by Kashani originally posted on Freshome. If you've enjoyed this post, be sure to follow Freshome on Twitter, Facebook and Google+

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Sleek Wooden Bathroom Collection by Kashani

Alpha bath Royal Fig Stool by Kashani Sleek Wooden Bathroom Collection by Kashani

Kashani is an Israeli company founded by brothers Efi and Shlomi Kashani. The duo combine state of the art engineering capabilities with design skills and craftsmanship to create the most gorgeous bathroom furniture. The products are made in small numbers with a limited production and are therefore easily customizable by the end user. Each design starts life as a sketch on a piece of paper before being transformed into a digital prototype using 3D modelling software. After thorough testing, the products are manufactured from wood using CNC milling machines and finished by hand.

Kashanis Alpha bath Sleek Wooden Bathroom Collection by Kashani

Kashani currently produce three different ranges designed by Naty Moskovich and Yonatan Assouline: Logged up; Wood & White; and Alpha. The Wood & White series is created using CNC technology to form the wood which is then given a beautiful contrast through the use of white powder paint. The stand alone Sandra bath is complemented by the Alex sink with its functional Corian shelf, which is also a feature of the Rif Raf stools.

Alpha bath from the Round About collection by Kashani Sleek Wooden Bathroom Collection by Kashani

The smooth lines and elegant curves of the stand alone Alpha bath make for a sculptural addition to the Alpha bathroom collection. The Feijoa sink is the perfect addition to the range and when joined by the Royal fig stool the overall effect of the collection is simply breathtaking.

Sandra bath from the Wood White Collection by Kashani Sleek Wooden Bathroom Collection by Kashani

Alex sink from the Wood White Collection by Kashani Sleek Wooden Bathroom Collection by Kashani

Kashanis Feijoa sink Sleek Wooden Bathroom Collection by Kashani

Alpha bath by Kashani Sleek Wooden Bathroom Collection by Kashani

Alex sink by Kashani Sleek Wooden Bathroom Collection by Kashani

Alex sink Rif Raf stool by Kashani Sleek Wooden Bathroom Collection by Kashani

Royal Fig Stool from the Round About Collection by Kashani Sleek Wooden Bathroom Collection by Kashani

Rif Raf Stools from the Wood White collection by Kashani Sleek Wooden Bathroom Collection by Kashani

Feijoa sink from the Round About collection by Kashani Sleek Wooden Bathroom Collection by Kashani

Rif Raf Stool Alex sink by Kashani Sleek Wooden Bathroom Collection by Kashani

Would you agree that these collections are stunning? Be sure to let us know what you think below in the comments sections.

You’re reading Sleek Wooden Bathroom Collection by Kashani originally posted on Freshome. If you’ve enjoyed this post, be sure to follow Freshome on Twitter, Facebook and Google+


Singapore Subordinate Courts Complex / Serie Architects + Multiply Architects

Courtesy of Serie Architects +

The Subordinate Courts of recently announced the proposal by Serie Architects and Multiply Architects as the winning design for their new courts complex. Their design features an innovative two tower strategy in which one tower is dedicated to the criminal courtrooms and the other to the judges’ chambers and support functions. The two towers are linked by a series of foot bridges that enable the controlled circulation necessary for the courtroom process. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Courtesy of Serie Architects + Multiply Architects

The courtroom tower is an open frame supporting a series of shared terraces on which the courtrooms are placed: it has no external facade. In a metaphorical sense, this represents the openness and impartiality of the judicial process. The open terraces feature planting and are designed to allow views across the city thereby reinforcing the civic role of the building.

entrance

The existing Subordinate Courts building (i.e. Octagon), built in the 1970s, will be refurbished and will house 35,000sqm of family and juvenile courts and support functions. The two new 150m high towers will have an area of 110,000sqm and will accommodate criminal courts.

waiting area

Construction is scheduled to begin next year and to be completed in 2019. The open design competition jury was headed up by internationally acclaimed architect Moshe Safdie. In a joint statement, the jury praised the ‘simple but dignified’ design which ‘complements the conserved octagon without trying to outshine it.’

courtroom

Chris Lee, Principal at Serie Architects, comments, ‘the relationship between the city and its civic buildings was our primary interest for this project. The new Subordinate Courts Complex should be a building that is symbolically open and accessible to the public. The design language should be readily understood by all Singaporeans.’

Singapore Subordinate Courts Complex (1) Courtesy of Serie Architects + Multiply Architects
Singapore Subordinate Courts Complex (2) Courtesy of Serie Architects + Multiply Architects
Singapore Subordinate Courts Complex (3) entrance
Singapore Subordinate Courts Complex (4) waiting area
Singapore Subordinate Courts Complex (5) courtroom
Singapore Subordinate Courts Complex (6) terrace

Te Wharewaka / architecture +

Courtesy of architecture +

Architects: architecture +
Location: ,
Design Team: Stuart Gardyne, Michael Bennett, Chris Hay, Damon Peachey, Erini Kaldelis, Nick Whiting, Kirsty Chamberlain, Todd Allen, Belinda Tuohy, Iain Hibbard, Janie Morris, Craig Thompson, Andrew Camberis
Project Year: 2011
Project Area: sqm
Photographs: Paul McCredie, Grant Sheehan

This project has had a long gestation. The project is the culmination of a lengthy period of design, discussion and debate, and consultation involving many participants and the public. The concept of a Wharewaka adjacent to the lagoon was first suggested in 2000 when it was proposed that the south end of the Frank Kitts carpark be converted into a facility to accommodate the waka and its supporting functions.

Courtesy of architecture +

Soon after this an alternative site was proposed at the south end of the lagoon. In 2003 architecture+ were asked to look at developing a conceptual design for this site. Oceanic Architecture became involved at this stage and after considering many ideas, agreement was reached on a scheme which proposed a two-building concept as a way of overcoming many dilemmas associated with earlier proposals.

Courtesy of architecture +

This scheme was developed and presented to the public for consultation prior to obtaining Resource Consent in 2005. Most recently modifications to the scheme necessitated by financial considerations and modifications to the City to Seabridge across Jervois Quay have resulted in a new proposal which incorporates the waka and all other functions in a single building.

Courtesy of architecture +

The location is significant, as the location of the Wharewaka was previously harbour frontage to Te Aro Pa, one of the largest Maori communities in Wellington up until the 1880’s. The Wharewaka will play a significant role in the telling some of the stories of the pa located around the Harbour. It will also be significant in achieving the goal of re-establishing a Maori presence in the city and on the waterfront, notably absent since the 1880s.

Courtesy of architecture +

The building has strong spatial relationships to the open space on all sides. The front and the marae atea face northeast, as is the convention. The atea sits between the pae-pae of the building and the sculpture of Kupe. The axis of the building, and the alignmentof the tahuhu, is on the Kupe sculpture, and to the south the Free Ambulance building. Whilst the raison d’être of the Wharewaka is to showcase and shelter waka, the building is in its own right animportant building from a cultural, civic and architectural perspective. Its presence therefore is seen as being beneficial in many ways to the cultural development of the city.

Site Plan

A distinctive aspect of the building is the concept of the exterior ‘cloak’. The korowai (cloak) is developed in the design of the buildings as an outer layer giving protection to the building in a manner similar to that which the korowai gives to the human body. The cloak covers the body of the building, draping down its sides. It has been designed to allow transparency and facilitate access into and out of the building where desired and to provide enclosure elsewhere. It provides environmental control to the building by providing shading to reduce solar gains. The sculptural form of the cloak creates a constantly changing visual expression to the building.

Elevations

Te Wharewaka / architecture + Courtesy of architecture +
Te Wharewaka / architecture + Courtesy of architecture +
Te Wharewaka / architecture + Courtesy of architecture +
Te Wharewaka / architecture + Courtesy of architecture +
Te Wharewaka / architecture + Courtesy of architecture +
Te Wharewaka / architecture + Courtesy of architecture +
Te Wharewaka / architecture + Courtesy of architecture +
Te Wharewaka / architecture + Courtesy of architecture +
Te Wharewaka / architecture + Courtesy of architecture +
Te Wharewaka / architecture + Courtesy of architecture +
Te Wharewaka / architecture + Courtesy of architecture +
Te Wharewaka / architecture + Courtesy of architecture +
Te Wharewaka / architecture + Courtesy of architecture +
Te Wharewaka / architecture + Courtesy of architecture +
Te Wharewaka / architecture + Courtesy of architecture +
Te Wharewaka / architecture + Courtesy of architecture +
Te Wharewaka / architecture + Courtesy of architecture +
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Te Wharewaka / architecture + Site Plan 01
Te Wharewaka / architecture + Plan 01
Te Wharewaka / architecture + Plan 02
Te Wharewaka / architecture + Plan 03
Te Wharewaka / architecture + Elevations 01
Te Wharewaka / architecture + Elevation 01
Te Wharewaka / architecture + Sections 01
Te Wharewaka / architecture + Section 01