H24 House / R Zero Studio

© Aki Itami

Architects: R Zero Studio
Location: Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico
Design Team: Edgar Velasco Casillas, Alejandro Zarate de la Torre, Gilberto Muñoz + , Isaac Guzman Ramirez, Pablo Serrano
Photographs: Aki Itami, Courtesy of H24 House

Structure: Giron Megaproyectos S.A. de C.V. Ing. Humberto Giron
Engineering: IP Diseños S.A. de C.V.
Contruction And Management: Nano C S.A. de C.V. Roman Garcia, Claudia Garcia and Adriana Cruz

In the southern part of Mexico City, on an irregular plot of land which offers just a few meters of front façade, this one-family residence solves the lack of contact with its environment by producing its own context, unfolding itself around a self-created landscape.

© Aki Itami

A decreasing succession of scale grants character to the interior space, beginning with the access through a triple-height patio wrapped in glass and cement blocks framing the sky as a landscape above. By night, this landscape is reproduced on the walls of the main stairway with a set of lights that reminds of a constellation.

Courtesy of H24 House

Access to the public areas is granted through a double-height space which immediately denotes the sensation of lightness and transparency that prevails throughout the entire residence. The contrast between solid elements embellished with texture and complete transparency, offers a very clear understanding of the way the house functions, so the location of service areas, stairways and leisure spaces are easily sensed by the user.

Courtesy of H24 House

Semi-public and private areas possess a more intimate scale and like in the rest of the house, are flooded with sunlight.

© Aki Itami

Through the formal simplicity of the built spaces, the architecture stands aside and gives away the lead role of the project to the main stage of the client´s activities: the garden. The use of unfinished materials (cement blocks, steel, wood, glass and concrete on the façade) links the building with its natural context, conferring personality to this architecture –the space container–, which at the same time contains the exterior space. Seen from the garden, the transparency of the interior facades unveils the activities within the house, erasing the limits between interior and exterior, merging as a whole the built with the un-built.

Plan

H24 House / R Zero Studio © Aki Itami
H24 House / R Zero Studio © Aki Itami
H24 House / R Zero Studio © Aki Itami
H24 House / R Zero Studio © Aki Itami
H24 House / R Zero Studio © Aki Itami
H24 House / R Zero Studio Courtesy of H24 House
H24 House / R Zero Studio Courtesy of H24 House
H24 House / R Zero Studio Courtesy of H24 House
H24 House / R Zero Studio Courtesy of H24 House
H24 House / R Zero Studio Courtesy of H24 House
H24 House / R Zero Studio Courtesy of H24 House
H24 House / R Zero Studio Courtesy of H24 House
H24 House / R Zero Studio © Aki Itami
H24 House / R Zero Studio Plan 01
H24 House / R Zero Studio Plan 02
H24 House / R Zero Studio Section 01

H24 House / R Zero Studio originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 31 Jul 2012.

send to Twitter | Share on Facebook | What do you think about this?

Studio MK 27, estudio de fotografía en São Paulo (Brasil)

El diseño del edificio tiene su origen en un concurso interno entre tres equipos de Studio MK27, que trabajaron en varias líneas paralelas de investigación, finalmente refundidas en el proyecto definitivo. En este, el solar quedó dividido…


Joan Bassegoda, el espejo enciclopédico de Gaudí

La obra de Antoni Gaudí es universal y se puede palpar en sus edificios, en sus muebles, en sus dibujos. Un universo ingente en el que Joan Bassegoda Nonell…


Bertrand Goldberg: In Color

For years Northwestern University has been trying to rid themselves of the Prentice Women’s Hospital, Bertrand Goldberg’s brutalist flower located on the university’s downtown Medical Campus. To say that Prentice presents a unique hospital configuration or that the legacy of brutalist icons such Marcel Breuer, Goldberg, or Paul Rudolph have weathered unfavorably is putting it mildly. Nonetheless, a litany of prominent architects and academics from across the country have written in support of the hospital. That the debate over the hospital’s future has been protracted over nearly a half-decade is telling not only of Goldberg’s idiosyncratic appeal, but the extent to which the legacies of Late- and Post-modernism stand to be judged on the all-or-nothing basis of the contemporary historic preservation model.

The case for Goldberg’s hospital rests on two points: First, that Goldberg is a seminal figure in the city’s architectural history whose production over four decades has be…

The Imperial Buildings / Fearon Hay Architects

© Patrick Reynolds

Architects: Fearon Hay Architects
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Project Year: 2011
Project Area: 5000.0 sqm
Photographs: Patrick Reynolds

Built between 1886 and 1911, the Imperial Buildings are a rich mix of heritage spaces and building fabric in downtown Auckland. The brief sought to bring this mix together with a comprehensive rework, restoration and upgrade of the existing buildings.

© Patrick Reynolds

The design approach is based on creating a new network of circulation through the properties, enabling connection and interaction of previously inaccessible volumes contained within the buildings. The backbone of this strategy is a new laneway for Auckland: Imperial Lane.

Section

This ground level connection between recently upgraded serviceway Fort Lane and the retail thoroughfare of Queen Street is activated by street dining serviced from central tables stepped to follow the level of the new ramped lane.

© Patrick Reynolds

Vertical shafts are cut through the floors above the lane, introducing light into the space and a language of opaque glass and steel to complement the ‘found’ brickwork, timber truss, stone and dilapidated concrete of the original fabric.

Elevation

A vertical connection is made from the middle of the lane – a sculptural staircase accesses a new courtyard on the level above ground.

© Patrick Reynolds

This courtyard was carved from a service-filled lightwell, with large openings formed in the surrounding walls and the addition of new steel plate stairways and balconies ensuring that spaces over the upper levels enjoy connection and interaction with this enlarged central space.

© Patrick Reynolds

The network of public connection and open circulation spaces provides a sense of precinct for the five levels of commercial office space, restaurants, bars and retail spaces that have now occupied the revitalised buildings.

© Patrick Reynolds

The Imperial Buildings / Fearon Hay Architects © Patrick Reynolds
The Imperial Buildings / Fearon Hay Architects © Patrick Reynolds
The Imperial Buildings / Fearon Hay Architects © Patrick Reynolds
The Imperial Buildings / Fearon Hay Architects © Patrick Reynolds
The Imperial Buildings / Fearon Hay Architects © Patrick Reynolds
The Imperial Buildings / Fearon Hay Architects © Patrick Reynolds
The Imperial Buildings / Fearon Hay Architects © Patrick Reynolds
The Imperial Buildings / Fearon Hay Architects © Patrick Reynolds
The Imperial Buildings / Fearon Hay Architects © Patrick Reynolds
The Imperial Buildings / Fearon Hay Architects © Patrick Reynolds
The Imperial Buildings / Fearon Hay Architects Plan 01
The Imperial Buildings / Fearon Hay Architects Elevation 01
The Imperial Buildings / Fearon Hay Architects Section 01

The Imperial Buildings / Fearon Hay Architects originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 31 Jul 2012.

send to Twitter | Share on Facebook | What do you think about this?

Historic Front Street / Cook + Fox Architects

© Cook+Fox Architects

Architect: Cook + Fox Architects, LLP
Location: New York, NY
Client: Yarrow LLC
Completion: April 2006
Size: 150,000 SF

   

© Cook+Fox Architects

The South Street Seaport in lower Manhattan has a long history that has left a great impression on the economic development of New York City.  Once a hub for the thriving shipping, dry goods and grocery industry, it has since turned into a space for public gathering with entertainment, retail, restaurants, water taxi stands and a venue for summer concerts.  In between the demise of the exporting industry for the port and its reemergence as a cultural landmark, the historic brick warehouse buildings of the area were suffering from decades of decay and neglect.  Cook + Fox Architects were among the firms that contributed to the massive effort required to revive the neighborhood.  Eleven historic buildings along Front Street were transformed as part of this effort in 2006.

© Seong Kwon for Cook+Fox Architects

Front Street, though full of historic buildings, also had a few voids to fill along the block.  Three modern structures were built on these lots, respecting the neighborhood’s scale and fitting into the historic context.  The language of the architecture is clearly modern, but authentic with the nautical history of the site.  The buildings also demonstrate a commitment to environmentally conscious design.  Ten geothermal walls provide cooling for the entire project and eliminates the need for rooftop cooling towers that could endanger the historic buildings.

Plans, © Cook+Fox Architects

As for the existing structures, Cook + Fox did precise, minimally invasive restoration work to protect the character of the buildings and their history. In order to bring the buildings up to a contemporary standard of living, careful incisions were performed to bring light and air, as well as views, to the new residents of the restored buildings.  Residents cross two garden courtyards that open up the block, and preserve, in spatial layout, the commercial character of the street wall.  The buildings are now integrated into a mixed-use neighborhood that include 95 rental apartments and small-scale independent retailers.

Historic Front Street / Cook + Fox Architects (1) © Cook+Fox Architects
Historic Front Street / Cook + Fox Architects (2) © Cook+Fox Architects
Historic Front Street / Cook + Fox Architects (3) © Cook+Fox Architects
Historic Front Street / Cook + Fox Architects (4) © Cook+Fox Architects
Historic Front Street / Cook + Fox Architects (5) © Seong Kwon for Cook+Fox Architects
Historic Front Street / Cook + Fox Architects (6) © Cook+Fox Architects
Historic Front Street / Cook + Fox Architects (7) Plans, © Cook+Fox Architects

Historic Front Street / Cook + Fox Architects originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 31 Jul 2012.

send to Twitter | Share on Facebook | What do you think about this?

The New Architectural Wisdom of Airports: Ikea, iPads, And Ice Skating Rinks

Take Korea’s Incheon International, for example. Built on top of a landfill 40 miles outside of Seoul, it features its own skating rink, cultural museum, and an assortment of other lavish amenities — all worthy investments for an airport that transported 34 million passengers and 2.5 million tons of cargo last year.

AD Round Up: BIG Part II

© Jens Lindhe


For today’s Round Up, we bring you the second part of previously featured projects by one of our favorite studios, BIG. Take this opportunity to check again the unique mixed-use 8-House in Copenhagen. Also you can see West 57th the BIG proposal for the awkwardly shaped large site at West Side Highway and 57th Street in New York.Check out the colorful Superkilen a collaboration between BIG and Topotek 1 and the amazing proposal for National Library in Astana, Kazakhstan. Finally, revisit one of 2010 AD Building of the year, the incredible Denmark Pavilion in Shanghai Expo.

AD Round Up: BIG Part II originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 31 Jul 2012.

send to Twitter | Share on Facebook | What do you think about this?

AI WEIWEI: NEVER SORRY

Alison Klayman gained unprecedented access to the charismatic artist, as well as his family and others close to him, while working as a journalist in Beijing. In the years she filmed, government authorities shut down Ai’s blog, beat him up, bulldozed his newly built studio, and held him in secret detention–while Time Magazine named him a runner-up for 2011′s Person of the Year… Klayman’s compelling documentary portrait is the inside story of a passionate dissident for the digital age…